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MrEarl

WHO'S GOING TO DANVERS?

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32 days and counting. So who's going, when you getting there and what are ya bringin.

I'll be there... with Bob Coker and acting as official custodian and chauffeur of the '54 Landau again. Gettin there Wednesday, right Bob? :)

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I'm flyin and bringing a redhead....

I will be bumming a ride for the PWD AfterTour

(Unless somebody needs an experienced prewar Buick driver to bring more than one car)

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I'll probably take a ride up......................

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We're flying in Tuesday. Not bringing a 1/1 scale Buick...sigh.

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We'll be there...looks like we will in the select few "Texas Road Warriors" that will actually drive. Stay tuned for our annual adventures.

Willie

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I'm a select TRW driving... BUT it won't be a Buick. The family and I are spending a month on the East Coast going to museums and baseball games. I just sent in registration for the meet and got Hotel reservations.

Oh yeah, I got Red Sox tickets for Thursday night.

Looking forward to it as always.

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We're planning to be there later Tuesday, go on Boston tour Wed. then relax and soak up the cars to leave Sat. afternoon. Planning to bring 97 Riviera 140K miles. I'm really looking forward to meeting Forum posters.

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planning on being there thursday with my blue 62 invicta.looking forward to seeing all the bca members and their buicks,4 bufords from ct

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Flying in from Texas, hopefully Hertz will have a Buick waiting for me.

I fly into Providence for several reasons, I hate the tunnel between Boston and the airport.

Providence is far less crowded, and by Texas standards Providence to Danvers,

is just "down the road" . We also have some visiting to do.

See you in about 4 weeks...... presently we are in Indiana on our way to the Ohio BDE tour.

Edited by Barney Eaton (see edit history)

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I will be there along with my father, Ed. For my dad this will be his first national since Richmond in 2000 (11 years) and his 17th overall. For me this will be the 24th National Meet I attend. We are a driving up in the Enclave and will arrive Tuesday night.

We will have 2012 National Meet information, registration forms. shirts for sale, etc. The table will be manned by members of the 2012 exec team and the Cabarrus County CVB from Wednesday Morning to Sat Mid day.

Unfortunately my wife and son will miss out again this year, but they'll be at 2012 of course.

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Flying in late Tuesday night. Looking forward to some Lobsta and Chowdah.

Going to try and get walk up Red Sox tickets (or scalpers).

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Commuting from Weymouth Wednesday/Thursday and staying over Friday/Saturday. Will be my first BCA National and have entered my 92 Riviera for judging.

Will be selling the BCA logo belt buckles, grille badges, hat/lapel pins, and key fobs all day/each day and expect y'all to be buying big!!

By the way, Boston is pronounced Bahstin...

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TRAFFIC ALERT for those using I-84 in CT.

i am not sure if I should start a new thread, but maybe I will do that when we have more information.

Due to budget probems, the State of Connecticut will be closing the east bound rest area near Exit 69 as of July 1. So far this seems to be just the one headed east, but others will likely close also some time later. There is a bit of an uproar so this may change. There is a "commercial" truck stop nearby, I believe Exit 72, if you realy need to stop. However, I think you are all aware that CT has probably the most expensive gasoline tax in the country. If you can extend your travel (about 1/2 hour or 25 miles) , there is a rest stop in Charlton, MA just after I-84 merges with the MA Turnpike. We would love to have you buy gas in CT to help save us locals some tax revenue, but I feel bound to advise my Buick friends not to plan on gas purchase in this state. The MA Turnpike features several fast food options, as well as fuel and easy parking for trailers if that is needed.

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We will be there, not arriving until the 7th. Leaving home on the 3rd and taking our time touring on the way out, going up through Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine with the 70 Riviera. We have a couple special night stops planned, one is Light on the lake near North East PA and the other is The a night at the Tidewater Hotel in Vinelhaven Me, so we are making a long trip of it. Hope drop down to Rhode Island on the way home then take old hwy 30 across Pa on the way home.

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Linda and I will be there Thursday evening and leaving on Saturday after the show. Bringing the GS and taking the slow drive via Rt 2 from Albany NY straight through. Has anyone heard anything about a Forum Breakfast?

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John, and others.

Lamar will be organizing the details. I offered to do the site arrangement because I am closer. I am trying to get the hotel to get back to me with details and cost for a private room breakfast, much like we did in Ames, but they are a bit slow. I have another off-site option if this does not gel, or is deemed too expensive. It will be Friday morning.

John

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Thanks for that info John, once we have something established as far as where it will be held, I will start the "official" BCAFers Breakfast thread. :D

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Alas, I will not be there (even though it's relatively close). Curse this 16-year-old wallet.. :o

BUT I will most certainly be there for 2012 in Charlotte. Looking forward to my first National, and meeting all of yall too!

See yall in 2012, have fun in Bahstin!

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For those who want to study up on speakin Bostonian...:)

<table border="1" cellpadding="2" cellspacing="0" width="440"><tbody><tr><td width="150">AGGIVADID</td> <td width="275">Aggravated; irritated or annoyed. Old North End and East Boston term.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">AJIDA</td> <td width="275">In the old North End and East Boston Italian-American neighborhoods, agida referred to heartburn or being mentally irritated. From the Italian word agitare which means to churn or agitate.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">ALLAGY</td> <td width="275">Allergy.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">ANTENOR</td> <td width="275">Antenna. Inverse "r" example.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">AUDER</td> <td width="275">Order.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">BAH</td> <td width="275">A bar, or place that serves alcohol.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">BAHBA</td> <td width="275">A barber, or person that cuts hair.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">BADING SUIT</td> <td width="275">Bathing suit.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">BLINKERS</td> <td width="275">Automobile directional signals.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">BREAKDOWN LANE</td> <td width="275">A highway shoulder.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">BUBBLER</td> <td width="275">Office water fountain (bottled). Pronounced "Bubbla."</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">BULKIE</td> <td width="275">A small round sandwich bread or "roll."</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">CAH</td> <td width="275">An automobile.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">CHOWDA</td> <td width="275">Clam chowder.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">CON</td> <td width="275">Corn.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">CONNA</td> <td width="275">Corner.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">CULLA</td> <td width="275">Color.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">DECENT</td> <td width="275">Cool or Unique; a popular term in the 1970s.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">DISINTERGRATED</td> <td width="275">Disintegrated. Inverse "r" example.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">DOOZY BATZ</td> <td width="275">In the old North End and East Boston Italian-American neighborhoods, it described a person that was fearless or had violent tendencies. Pazzo means crazy in Italian. "Tu Sei" (you are) + "Pazzo" (crazy) is the probable origin. "Du Say Batzo" evolved to "Doozy Batz." How one pronounced it, and one's body language, conveyed how "fearless" that person was.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">DUFF</td> <td width="275">To deliberately avoid a person or break a promise to meet with someone. Old North End and East Boston term.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">ELASTIC</td> <td width="275">A rubber band.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">ENVIAMENT</td> <td width="275">Environment.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">EYEIN</td> <td width="275">Iron.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">FOEWID</td> <td width="275">Forward.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">FOILAGE</td> <td width="275">Foliage.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">FOK</td> <td width="275">Fork.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">FOTTY</td> <td width="275">Forty.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">FRAPPE</td> <td width="275">Pronounced "Frap." Whipped milk, ice cream, and flavoring. This editor used to mix hot coffee with vanilla ice cream and heavy cream back in the old days! Similar to a milkshake.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">GAHBIDGE</td> <td width="275">Garbage.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">GAVONE</td> <td width="275">In the old North End and East Boston Italian-American neighborhoods, it meant someone that was overdressed or completely out of place; from the Italian word Cafone which roughly translates to a loud and obnoxious person. Also pronounced gavoni which is phonetically closer to Italian.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">GRAVY</td> <td width="275">Spaghetti sauce.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">HOODSIE</td> <td width="275">A small cup of vanilla & chocolate ice cream sold by ice cream trucks. Eaten with a paper-wrapped small wooden spoon that resembled a short popsicle stick. Also (very offensive slang), a teenage girl. </td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">HUSSES</td> <td width="275">Horses; in the Irish-American neighborhoods it was pronounced Husses, and in the Italian-American neighborhoods it was pronounced Hosses (often with a nasal sound).</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">ITALIAN ICE</td> <td width="275">Shaved ice with various flavorings added; also known as Slush.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">JIMMIES</td> <td width="275">Ice cream sprinkles, usually chocolate.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">LIBERRY</td> <td width="275">A book depository or library.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150" height="21">NACKINS</td> <td width="275" height="21">Napkins.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">NAYCHA</td> <td width="275">Nature.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">NEKKALACE</td> <td width="275">Necklace.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">NOTH</td> <td width="275">North. "R" is silent; add nasal sound.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">OVA</td> <td width="275">Over; as in "Over the Rainbow."</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">OUWWAH</td> <td width="275">Hour.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PACKY</td> <td width="275">A liquor store, or "package" store.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PAHDEE</td> <td width="275">Party.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PAHDEE PLATTA</td> <td width="275">A tray of cold cuts sold as one unit; party platter.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PAHLA</td> <td width="275">The Family or Living Room in a house or apartment; parlor.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PATS</td> <td width="275">The New England Patriots football team.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PERPERTRATOR</td> <td width="275">Perpetrator. Inverse "r" example.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PIDJUN</td> <td width="275">Pigeon.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PIMPLE BALL</td> <td width="275">A 1950s and 1960s inflated off-white rubber ball about the size of a baseball. The exterior had horizontal rows of bumps, with an embossed star on the top and bottom. Used for handball or step (gutter) ball games. Often cut in half for half-ball games. A popular term in many Northeast cities.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PISSA</td> <td width="275">Very good; often prefixed with WICKED.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PITCHEZ</td> <td width="275">Pictures.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">POCKET BOOK</td> <td width="275">A woman's purse or handbag.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PODADAH</td> <td width="275">Potato; also pronounced Podado depending on your town or neighborhood.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PRIVLEDGEZ</td> <td width="275">Privileges.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PUNKIN</td> <td width="275">Pumpkin.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PUSS</td> <td width="275">To have a miserable expression on one's face; "Why the Puss on your face?"</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">RAG</td> <td width="275">To exaggerate; tell ragtime stories.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">ROTARY</td> <td width="275">A traffic circle or round-about.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SATTADAY</td> <td width="275">Saturday.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SCOOTCH</td> <td width="275">In the old North End and East Boston Italian-American neighborhoods, it referred to someone that was annoying; from the Italian word Scocciare which roughly translates to the verb "to bother." Also, in old Yankee slang, to scooch was to crouch down. Often pronounced similarly in a way that rhymes with "Butch." Children and pets could be called "Scutches" for example. Irksome is a close match in English.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SCROD</td> <td width="275">Fish; sometimes haddock, sometimes cod. Originally derived, most likely, by the combination of Scrawed (to cut and then dry) and Cod.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SELLA</td> <td width="275">A cellar; or basement.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SELTS</td> <td width="275">The Boston Celtics basketball team.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SHERBERT</td> <td width="275">Sherbet. Inverse "r" example.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SHOTS</td> <td width="275">Shorts, as in cut-off jeans.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SKEAVE</td> <td width="275">Repulsive or disgusting (often describing another person). From the word schifo in Italian. Very popular term before 1990 in the old Italian-American North End and East Boston neighborhoods.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SLUSH</td> <td width="275">Shaved ice with various flavorings added. Also known as Italian Ice.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SNEAKIZ</td> <td width="275">Sneakers; tennis or athletic shoes.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SOX</td> <td width="275">The Boston Red Sox baseball team.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SPA</td> <td width="275">A mom & pop small luncheonette.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SPUCKIE</td> <td width="275">A short, stout French roll with pointy ends; bigger than a bulkie roll, but smaller than a submarine roll. If memory serves, grilled sandwiches such as Chicken Parmesan and Meatballs were popular in Spuckie rolls. A sub would be wrapped in paper, while a Spuckie may be wrapped in foil to keep it warm. Purportedly coined from a North End spucadella roll (citation needed).</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">STAHVIN</td> <td width="275">A person that is hungry; "starving."</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">STAYPUHLA</td> <td width="275">Stapler.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SUB</td> <td width="275">A hogie, hero, grinder, "submarine" sandwich.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SUPPA</td> <td width="275">Dinner.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">TEMPUHCHA</td> <td width="275">Temperature.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">TEYEID</td> <td width="275">Tired; exhausted or fatigued.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">TONIC</td> <td width="275">Soda pop.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">TRIPLE-DECKER</td> <td width="275">3 story wood house, usually all apartments. Also known as a Three-Deckah or Tree-Deckah house.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">ULTZSIR</td> <td width="275">Ulcer.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">VARIETY STORE</td> <td width="275">A mom and pop convenience store.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">WICKED</td> <td width="275">Extremely good.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">WHIFFLE</td> <td width="275">A short crew cut, or boy's or men's haircut done with clippers.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">YAWW</td> <td width="275">"Yes" + "Yay" combined; very popular in the 1970s.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">YAWS</td> <td width="275">Yours; as in "yours truly" or "your's, mine, and our's" (an old slang cliche). </td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">YOGITT</td> <td width="275">Yogurt.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="425" height="19"> </td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">RAT (THE)</td> <td width="275">A famous metal and punk rock night club in Kenmore Square, short for Rathskeller (closed). In German, rathskeller means "council cellar."</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SANDS (THE)</td> <td width="275">Short for Blue Sands. A famous bar on Summer Street that catered to patrons ranging from punk rockers to artists to blue collar workers (closed).</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SPIT</td> <td width="275">A famous 1970s punk rock & new wave night club on Lansdowne Street (closed).</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="425" height="19"> </td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">BACK BAY</td> <td width="275">The area west of the Public Garden.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">CAPE (The)</td> <td width="275">Cape Cod.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">COMBAT ZONE</td> <td width="275">The old burlesque area of Boston at the foot of Washington Street near Essex Street.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">COMM AVE</td> <td width="275">Truncation of Commonwealth Avenue.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">LANDSDOWN</td> <td width="275">Lansdowne Street, Boston.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">MASS AVE</td> <td width="275">Truncation of Massachusetts Avenue.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PRU (The)</td> <td width="275">Prudential Center.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">QUINCY MARKET</td> <td width="275">Faneuil Hall Marketplace.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SCOLLAY SQUARE</td> <td width="275">The old burlesque area of Boston at the junction of Tremont, Court, Hanover, and Cambridge Streets.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">T (The)</td> <td width="275">The MBTA transit authority.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="425" height="19"> </td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">CONKIDD</td> <td width="275">Concord, Massachusetts</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">GLOSSTA</td> <td width="275">Gloucester, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">HOPKINGTON</td> <td width="275">Hopkinton, Massachusetts</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">LEMMINSTAH</td> <td width="275">Leominster, Massachusetts</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">MEDFID</td> <td width="275">Medford, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">NEWHAMSHA</td> <td width="275">The State of New Hampshire.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">NEWHAMSHIN</td> <td width="275">A Person From New Hampshire.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">NEWYOK</td> <td width="275">The State of New York.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">PEEBAHDEE</td> <td width="275">Peabody, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">P-TOWN</td> <td width="275">Provincetown, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">QUINZEE</td> <td width="275">Quincy, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">RUHVEEA</td> <td width="275">Revere, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SUMMAVILLE</td> <td width="275">Somerville, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">VAHMONT</td> <td width="275">The State of Vermont.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">VINYID</td> <td width="275">Martha's Vineyard island.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">WATTATOWN</td> <td width="275">Watertown, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">WINTRUP</td> <td width="275">Winthrop, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">WHISTAH</td> <td width="275">Worcester, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">WOOBIN</td> <td width="275">Woburn, Massachusetts.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="425" height="19"> </td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">BURRY</td> <td width="275">Roxbury neighborhood.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">EASTY</td> <td width="275">East Boston neighborhood.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">DOT</td> <td width="275">Dorchester neighborhood.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">J.P.</td> <td width="275">Jamaica Plain neighborhood.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">ROZZY</td> <td width="275">Roslindale neighborhood.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">SOUTHY</td> <td width="275">South Boston neighborhood.</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="150">TOWNY</td> <td width="275">A Charlestown neigh</td></tr></tbody></table>

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Now, if only someone could do that up in laminated quick reference cards, I'd be OK....

Actually, from history, it hasn't been that bad for me. I expect the children may have more difficulty. My bigger concern will be if we leave the confines of the meet and experience a higher proportion of native Bostonians....

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Don't forget to add these two towns, eh?

"Bill-rika" = Billerica, MA

"Hayv-rill" = Haverhill, MA

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And don't forget Baah Habaah....Bar Harbor. Oh yeah, it's "down Maine way.... not Mass.

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Commuting from Weymouth Wednesday/Thursday and staying over Friday/Saturday. Will be my first BCA National and have entered my 92 Riviera for judging.

Will be selling the BCA logo belt buckles, grille badges, hat/lapel pins, and key fobs all day/each day and expect y'all to be buying big!!

By the way, Boston is pronounced Bahstin...

Ship, Can't wait to see that 92 (and you to of course) BTW got the Riviera scripts, they're very nice. Thanks for the great deal.

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We have 2 rooms reserved at the Crown Plaza. 7-6 thru 7-9 but now only need one.

Anyone needing a room?

Let me know and I`ll get it transferred.

Bob

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