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Jonny88

Question: My olds die's when I slow down to a stop, please help with the problem if possible

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Hello Oldsmobile friends, I just took the 51 Oldsmobile out for a cruise this wonderful evening in Ohio. Well It turned out bad. the car was running great, as usuall, except for the trans slip every once in a while. I slowed down to a stop after going 55 on the highway and the engine died on me as the transmission shifted down to first gear. I got no clue. So I was stuck in the middle of traffic and had to push the car to the curb. I thought the battery had died on me since there is a short in the system. Luckly a advanced mechanic was driving buy and stopped to help. The electric fuel pump was not turning on when the key was in the ignition. he jumped the car and the Olds came to life. Then he noticed that one side of the carb, rochester 2 barrel, was more lean than the other. He adjusted it a little and I was on my way back to the garage. Well after getting off the highway again the car died, I started it and it was back at the garage in no time as I was in a panic.

Questions for you experienced Oldsmobile owners that might know about this:

Can anybody explain to me the reason that the car would die after coming to a stop. This usually happens randomly, but happend three times this evening. I have no clue, nothing is leaking out of the carborator or engine. My guess it might be the carborator.

Now a few weeks ago me and my uncle, who is a expert mechanic, idled the car lower, it shifted better and started alot better. If we idle the car to low, when shifed into drive the car would die, I think this is the case now, but I dont know. It is truly a messed up situation.

Please help guys, as this will hinder my ability to rely on the car in the major up coming parade here in Hamilton that is held every year, and when ever I take it on a cruise.

I honesty dont know what it could be, thanks for your help.

Jon

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The first thing I would do is increase the idle speed and see what happens? Is the battery/generator working properly, so that the coil gets enough juice to fire the spark plugs at idle?

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I was thinking the same thing, we did lower the idle a few weeks ago and I think that is causing the engine to not get enough oil pressure and causes it to die, hopefully that is all it needs, I am going to take a rest from restoring the old gal as I am finding to many problems with the car and just being in college I will not make enough for a few years to afford a engine rebuild and transmission rebuild. This 51 oldsmobile is tired and worn out, perhaps I should of waited a few years, its a good car though and I enjoyed what I could of done now, it is not road worthy at all, I have the desire to cruise, it will have to wait, thanks for all your help D Yaros and everybody else, you all have been a great help, I will not give up on the project but will rest away from it, its is becoming a money sinker. Take care, and thanks.

Jonny88

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I think I know what your problem is. This is true of all V8 Oldsmobile's. They were all made to GO - stopping is not designed into them...(BIG GRIN)!

Seriously - all old cars are money pits unless they were well maintained - most were never maintained and wheels were driven off of them.

If you can handle the truth - old cars need lots of gas, oil, and tender loving care (with a big bag of money to boot).

To enjoy the car, you must learn how to take care of it. You have to get your hands dirty. You try this and that (trial and error) until the problem is solved.

I have a 49 98 - still 6 volts - old wiring, dirty connections, wires broken inside of the insulation, bad points, loose connections, shorts in the wiring, and so on and so forth can cause the engine to stall. You have to fix one problem at a time. As you fix each problem the car becomes more reliable. At some point it becomes trust worthy but it is an old car and will never be as reliable as one off the show room floor.

College has nothing to do with owning an old car if you have the funds to do both but you must jump in and learn how to fix things. An example is with the fellow that jumped you off. Did he explain what he did or did you watched him closely to be able to duplicate his actions? If he adjusted the carb, did he tell you how much he turned the idle screws? How did he know that one side was lean? Do you have a factory shop manual? If not GET one. It covers most all your problems - you read about each problem every day and many times - you need to reread it until the light bulb goes off in your head the same way you study for a college test.

Old cars are fun and most are easy to fix but you can not be pushing it out of traffic - that may get you or someone killed.

Okay - I am finished with the bad father lecture!

The first thing to check is that all the battery connections are clean and tight including the ends that attach to the frame or block and the starter. Also check that the battery cables are not corroded in hidden places. Using the shop manual - trace the electrical connections that are related to starting and running the engine. Loosen them and wiggle the wires as you tighten them back into place. This one action removes the hidden corrosion that may be out of sight and intermittent in nature. These areas include the starter, the neutral safety switch, the ignition switch, the starter button switch, the coil and the distributor.

Did this solve the problem? Id not, does it only occur after driving the car until it is at operating temperature or does it occur when it is cold? Are the points clean since the car is 12 volts - if they did not put a resistor in the circuit or change the coil the points may be burning? Set to the correct gap? New condenser? Does wiggling the ignition key help or hinder (old switches fail and the connections internal to the switches may be corroded)?

The shop manual will also help you fix the transmission. Failure to address a simple transmission adjustment can cause transmission failure - BIG BUCKS!

Idle rpms should be set to about 400 in drive with the tires blocked and emergency brake set to keep the car from moving. This can be dangerous.

Use a vacuum gage to set idle air screws for proper balance in neutral and emergency brake set.

Get the car running correctly with 12 volts as 6 volts will NOT make the problems go away and will likely make them worse. Get the lights working as well - safety is the key item with any car - new or old.

Ron

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