Jump to content

1960 Buick vent window regulators


60electra225
 Share

Recommended Posts

1959/60 Buick vent window regulators #4775801 and 4775802 were superceded to #4814806 and 4814807 prior to my 1963 parts books being published. Yes, these parts ARE the same as 59/60 Chevrolet. These parts are reproduced and available as repaired originals via several Chevrolet restoration companies (eg Ecklers Late Great Chevy).

Cheers,

Rick (Fron the other side of Australia)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

These are fairly easy to self-repair, by the way. You can take them apart, grease them, and re-peen the 3 rivets. I have done this on a '60 Caddy and my '60 LeSabre with 100% success. I am confident that they will never come apart again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DinoBob has a good suggestion. Another repair idea: Neatly file/grind off those potmetal nubs flush with the end plate surface - those nubs are likely junk and caused the whole problem in the first place. Drill, thread, and secure end plate with new machine screws after you've cleaned and lubed the guts. Now this is the way GM shoulda done it - a permanent solution - SOP in my shop for years - NEVER a comeback. Good luck and happy motorin'!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Tri-shield or DinoBob,

Do you have any pictures or a more detailed explanation of this repair process? I'm about to replace the vent window seals on my 1960 4719 sedan. With the inner door panel and "waterproof" paper liner removed, I noticed that I can simply wind the vent window crank shaft and remove it from inside the door - there's nothing holding it in place although it seems like there should be. The problem is that my vent windows open OK with the crank but I need to push on the windows to get the squarish shaft below them to re-engage so I can close them.

Any help appreciated - thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am sorry to say i never photgraphed the process. But it's easy. There are three screws that hold the gear to the door. Unscrew them and the gear comes out. What you will probably discover is that the gear body has rivets that hold it together, that are coming loose. When the gear gets dirty and crusty, it binds. The force that should be turning the gear then finds the path of lesser resistance. When you turn the shaft, which is a worm gear, it then becomes a screw. It's literally trying to screw itself out of the gear housing. And the force that this generates splits the housing open. So what you need to do is open and clean the housing of the old, crusted dirt and lubricant, add new lubricant (White Lube is what I use), put everything back together, and then use a ballpeen hammer to re-peen the rivets that hold the housing together. Really it is dead simple when you get a look at the gear's innards- it's a very rudimentary design.

Take them out and get back to us on it. Mine took about 30 minutes total for both sides, once I had the door panels off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tri-shield, DinoBob and Pete, thanks for your assistance. Upon removing both the driver and pass side vent window regulators, I found the end plates to be missing as you predicted. I found one endplate in the driver's door but where the other one went is a mystery, although one of the rubber drainhole seals is missing and I guess the endplate could have eventually made it's way to freedom that way.

Both doors look like they were never taken apart - the original paper watershields were in place and there was no evidence of any tears, retaping, etc. I simply sawed off the old rivet heads, drilled a hole where they used to be, and used small machine screws, washers and nuts to refasten the endplate after completely degreasing them (Gumout) and relubing them with white lithium grease. I fashioned a new endplate from a piece of metal stock, using the original endplate as a template, and dabbed a bit of epoxy on the nuts to keep them secure. Unfortunately I have no pictures - my wife is out of town and took the camera. But both work good as new, and now I can spend the $150 per side that some Chevy parts houses are asking for repop regulators on something else - like new vent window seals, for a start.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love a happy ending! Just reading about some of the repairs we make and innovate brings a little tear to my eye (out of remembrance to my Dad), because I was raised working on cars with him and he taught me so many of those little shortcuts to save time and money. Glad it all worked out for you Jan_Zverina!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...