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I seldom sell a car, but when I do so, if I am rubbed the wrong way by a potential buyer, I back off quickly. I once sold a 61 Continental convertible at a very friendly price to a young fellow many years ago who was sweating when he counted out the money, telling me it was the most expensive car he had ever bought, but he wanted it so badly. After he handed me the money, I counted out $500 and handed it to him, telling him "Here is your $500 rebate". Had he tried to chisel me, I wouldn't have even sold him the car, let alone given a "rebate". That was about 30 years ago and he still has the car.

One other time after selling my 1939 LaSalle 4-door about 35 years ago, a young fellow stopped in at work, asking if I had any extra parts, as he was restoring a 39 LaSalle coupe. I had a complete 3 pc. grille, original Cadillac heater and some other good stuff and gave him everything for $45. Years later he stopped in at our tent at Hershey and showed me pictures of the car and thanked me for my help. This made my day, as it sure is nice to help fellow restorers, especially those who are starting in the hobby.

Over the years, have had cases where parts were sent to me without charge, to help me out and I have done the same for others. Not everyone is in this hobby for the money. We need to help the younger guys in every way that we can. Sometimes I have had times when I bought a part or parts and was told to just send whatever I though was a fair price. I can tell you that in that case, I probably sent more than what the seller would have asked for, so as to be fair to those who offer help. It's only a hobby.........

Fred

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David, shame on me for not starting my rant with "I know David well enough from our online and PM conversations to know that this is NOT a reflection of how he would do things!!" Similarly, the fellow I described who tried to my Corvette for the price of a Chevette is not a reflection on the great advice of bringing everything you need to finalize a sale - a great strategy. So not a criticism of Ed's methods either, which seem very valid. I kind of took those as givens...

Anyway, totally agree with Fred's thoughts here - and I have been on both giving and receiving end of the occasional "freebie" - much appreciated by a fellow hobbyist.

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Now and then I will do a small job for a customer, say replace a broken tail light lense, maybe replace a rad hose or some similar simple operation. When asked "How much?" I sometimes say "Whatever you think it's worth". You can learn a lot about people that way. You can especially learn if they are someone you would want to do a complete restoration for. I once had a new customer overpay me $100 for a fairly expensive job. Payment was in cash in an envelope that I didn't count in the presence of the customer. I returned the $100 and he has been a good customer ever since. I am convinced the extra $100 was a test.

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The point is most people are honest and will deal honestly if you give them a chance. Now and then we run into people that ASSUME you are going to try to cheat them and who argue over every nickle. They soon find themselves looking for someone else to do their work. Life is too short.

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Agree Jeff. The guy who does most of my work is someone I grew up with who became a professional mechanic and is truly talented at most aspects of restoration. He prefers to work on antiques for a small circle of people as a sideline hobby/business. Problem is he routinely undercharges and as I have him do a fair amount of work, I don't want him to think I am taking advantage. After fighting about bills (he refuses more $$) I finally came up with a solution, I bring him the occasional gift for one of his cars, which he appreciates. We are both happy with the bill then!

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Helping each other with stuff like that is where the hobby is at it's best, kudos to anyone with that kind of spirit rather than just trying to score a buck. And that goes double for helping a young beginner, Todd C

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I don't reccomend showing up with a trailer. If you show up that ready to buy, I guarantee that the price will be less flexible. Leave the trailer someplace and negotiate, but be prepared. Cash is a good thing to have in hand while making an offer.

I also have little patience when somebody starts the "It's gona cost me $$ to fix it up" Yea, so what? How is that my concern? I'm not paying for your restoration. The price is as set for the car as it sits.

Patience and respect is the key. In the 10+ years I negotiated for my Skyliner, I stopped by his house dozens of times. Only about 1/3 of those visits even mentioned the car. We talked about all things and eventually he even gave me a tour of the outbuildings. His biggest concern was that I only wanted to make money on the car. When I showed up a couple months after I got it road worthy and let him drive it again, he actually shed some tears and thanked me profusely as did his neighbor when they saw the car back, top down and Len behind the wheel.

Here is Len next to my 59 as we hauled her off to my place...

He knows I was honest and paid a reasonable price for the car without making him feel like I was stealing from him. As it turns out there were dozens of people who had made offers over the years and many were more than what I paid. Len felt that I was the only one who was honest and respectful of him and the memories of that car. The difference was I wanted the car for me, not an investment.

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Edited by Amphicar BUYER (see edit history)
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My baby is the best looking baby ever; my dog is smarter than your cat; my house is the only one that hasn't lost value in the current market; I'm smarter than my boss.

Everyone always thinks that whatever they have, it is supperior to that which everyone elese has. Make what you feel is fair offer, be curtious and polite. If he's insulted, it says more about him than you.

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Regarding "freebies", those are the ultimate high in the collecting world.

I was once talking to a really nice guy on the west coast about my Model 16 Buick, and the conversation turned to top irons. I mentioned that I was missing one iron, and in conversation, he asked "which one". I told him, passenger side back corner, just making conversation.

Two weeks later, in the mail, the exact iron, handmade, that I needed. He had the patterns, and made one, not expecting nor asking for payment. Wow.

I have a friend, his father was restoring a car, all done but upholstery. His father had a health scare, wanted interior and top (touring car) done so he could see car completed in case things went south. He supplied leather and top fabric, I did it for free to get it done. He's paying me back by restoring a couple of engines for me, so I guess I didn't do it for free, but money was not the object.

That's the beauty of the true car collectors, not in it for a buck, in it for the fun and friendship.

And Steve....I have comprehensive understanding! dc

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What great advice on how to approach the problem seller. It seems to me that old car owners, especially those not involved in the hobby, are often dreamers who think their car is worth much more than it is, and that it is like the restored one sold at auction, shills and all, or its value is the #1condition price for a #4 car. But it may simply be that this is someone who may not really want to sell a car, only want to find out what he might get for it if he did want to sell it. Kind of like what did Dad really leave me, maybe I'll restore it someday.

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About 12 years ago I located a brass car with an old restoration I remembered from my youth. I approached the owner, was shown the car and was told it was for sale. I did a study and made a offer that was generous as I wanted this car. "I don't think so" was his reply. This man did not know that I happened to know his ex sister-in law. A couple of years later I was visiting with her and unbeknown to me I found my offer was used by the owner as an appraisal to settle his divorce proceedings. Several more more years passed and I again called him about the car, "yes, it still is for sale". I raised my offer several thousand dollars now figuring he was interested in the monetary value. " I'll think about it and let you know." It has been over a year and I have heard nothing. Maybe some day I may get to buy it from his estate! There are many situations that there are no strategies for, no matter how nice you try to be.--Bob

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In following this thread, I can't help but chuckle. If you are in a buying mode, it seems there is a lot of thought about "unrealistic sellers & dreamers" yet if you are in a selling mode, patience often wears thin with "tire kickers, dreamers & Chiselers"

I guess a lot of it comes down to which perspective you have at any given time! :)

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I guess a lot of it comes down to which perspective you have at any given time! :)

No Steve, what it really comes down to is, "How bad do I want to buy it?"

or, "How bad do I want to sell it?":);)

Wayne

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I'll chime in with a short story, one handed down from relatively reliable sources. In Connecticut there is a 1927 Playboy Roadster on farm house type of property in a barn very near a river. The car was not running and needed a total resto. The river flooded one year and half the car was under water. The "rust line" midway up the doors was obvious. The owner passed on leaving it to his widow and based on friends and media, a value of $40K was set. A realistic value based on condition is about $4-5K. Many an individual has tried to purchase it with the same result, firm based on how rare is a Playboy. I suspect it will sit there till it becomes an Estate matter.

Edited by Friartuck
Typo (see edit history)
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I get many offers to buy my Skyliner. I smile and say "You don't have enough money to buy this one!" that sometimes is misunderstood that I assume they have no money so I explain then that the price of this car is far more that it's actual value. Sometimes I will tell them thanks for the offer but they could buy a much better car, cheaper than what I want for this one.

My skyliner has been a dream car of mine since I was 14 so it's value has no actual number attached to it. This one took me 10+years to aquire and it still makes me smile when I look at her.

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One problem many of us have when trying to buy from non-enthusiasts is that they have already spent their asking price in their mind.

So, a $20,000 sale in his mind is going to immediately turn itself into a new bass boat or pay off his truck before the bank reposseses it. Offering someone like that the $10,000 that the car is actually worth means they don't get the boat or the bank still takes the truck.

This is just another version of having too much emotion tied up in a car, with a new twist driven by this lousy economy.

Joe

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I get many offers to buy my Skyliner. I smile and say "You don't have enough money to buy this one!" that sometimes is misunderstood that I assume they have no money

I had an old friend named Rich who used to say stuff like this, and he was driving the same point as you are.

And almost always, at least when I was present, people took it the wrong way.

41144

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I get many offers to buy my Skyliner. I smile and say "You don't have enough money to buy this one!" that sometimes is misunderstood that I assume they have no money so I explain then that the price of this car is far more that it's actual value. Sometimes I will tell them thanks for the offer but they could buy a much better car, cheaper than what I want for this one.

My skyliner has been a dream car of mine since I was 14 so it's value has no actual number attached to it. This one took me 10+years to aquire and it still makes me smile when I look at her.

I, too, have always wanted a Skyliner. Unfortunately, their prices have gone beyond what I am willing to spend on a car.

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Fifteen years ago I was looking to purchase a '60 Ford convertible. I saw one listed for sale in OK. I made an offer that I thought was fair. Apparently, I insulted him. He absolutely refused any further conversation regarding the car. A year later he listed the car for the amount that I previously offered. I called back planning to offer the full amount. As soon as he realized he was talking to the person that made the offer a year ago, he hung up the phone. I figured that I would never own this car. A year after that I saw a '60 for sale in HMN. The photo looked familiar. It turned out to be the same car for sale. It was now in KY. I was able to purchase the car for $500 less than my offer to the seller in OK. I also saved another $400 in shipping the car to my house!

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Whenever I tried to sell an old car, I priced it based somewhat on price guides, but mostly on the condition of the given vehicle, what I had invested in it ( usually to make it functional, no big-$$ cosmetic investments in paint, chrome, or interiors), and the going rate for similar vehicles in my area...

Nobody ever seemed to be worried about "insulting" me with low-ball offers, and that's usually all I got.

I have to liquidate a few vehicles this year, so it will be interesting to see if / how things have changed since I last tried to sell something ( about 10 years ago ).

Edited by De Soto Frank (see edit history)
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In addition to antique cars, I have always been interested in old oak office furniture and decor. About 15 years ago I was at a major PA antique flea market and a vendor had a really nice and very old small oak table that would have made a nice stand for a printer in our offices. He had it priced at $150 and quickly dropped the price to $125. Naturally I was hoping for a nice round number of $100 and offered it to him. He became angry and told me "not one penny less than $125", so I told him I would think about it and continued to walk the flea market.

I finally decided to pay his price, when leaving for the day. All over his spaces were many signs - CASH ONLY - NO CREDIT CARDS - CASH ONLY - NO CREDIT CARDS. I like to joke around sometimes, so told him I was going to pay the $125, but asked in a serious tone if he would take a 2nd party-post dated check. (Sign didn't say anything about not taking checks). He went beserk and said the table was not for sale now. I let him rant and rave for awhile and when he calmed down, I pulled out the $125 in cash, which he accepted. Then when I asked for a receipt, he looked around on the ground and found an old book of matches, tearing off the cover and marking it: "Paid $125" and signed it "J.Cash". I still have the table somewhere at work and am glad that I made the purchase and am now sorry that I put the guy through so much mental anquish.

Those who go to Hershey each year know all about bargaining and such tactics.

Fred

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About 15 years ago I was at a major PA antique flea market and a vendor had a really nice and very old small oak table that would have made a nice stand for a printer in our offices. He had it priced at $150 and quickly dropped the price to $125. Naturally I was hoping for a nice round number of $100 and offered it to him. He became angry and told me "not one penny less than $125", so I told him I would think about it and continued to walk the flea market.

I finally decided to pay his price, when leaving for the day. All over his spaces were many signs - CASH ONLY - NO CREDIT CARDS - CASH ONLY - NO CREDIT CARDS. I like to joke around sometimes, so told him I was going to pay the $125, but asked in a serious tone if he would take a 2nd party-post dated check. (Sign didn't say anything about not taking checks). He went beserk and said the table was not for sale now. I let him rant and rave for awhile and when he calmed down, I pulled out the $125 in cash, which he accepted. Then when I asked for a receipt, he looked around on the ground and found an old book of matches, tearing off the cover and marking it: "Paid $125" and signed it "J.Cash". I still have the table somewhere at work and am glad that I made the purchase and am now sorry that I put the guy through so much mental anquish.

Fred

that is a great story

Sounds to me like that guy DESERVED the mental anguish IMHO

It was obvious you were approaching the transaction with a bit of humor, his inability to see it only speaks volumes of his overall attitude ...

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  • 2 months later...
I'm a newbie, but I will chime in on this discussion. What are the circumstances surrounding the sale? Is the seller a car buff or has he inherited the car and wants to move it for cash flow? What it amounts too is this...Does the seller really want to sell the vehicle or is he content to let it sit in a warehouse and continue to deteriorate? I would offer him $500 more than the price guide suggests to begin the negotiations and work up from there to the maximum price you are willing to pay. Be prepared to walk away. Never fall in love with a car before you own it.

Update:

The car in question that prompted this thread is still for sale--about nine months now. Still same price.

The guy owns five antique cars and two antique trucks, all of them purchased and/or restored by his father. He inherited every single one of them. I think this is part of the problem here.

Well, Auburn V-8 meet is coming up in August and I am going there with my money. Maybe someone will have what I want.

If the car is for sale when I get back, maybe I'll make my offer.

PP

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Interesting thread. I've been there many times, only sometimes am I happy.

On the other side, I was selling one of my personal favorites and the buyer asked: How did you arrive at that price?

I told him and he said OK and bought the car at my price. That put us both on the same level of knowledge of this particular vehicle.

Now 9 years later I wish I had the car, which appreciated wildly after the sale.

I hope I remember that question when I'm buying my next heart throb.

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Lots of interesting comments here... good food for thought...

I'll add one more... if the vehicle in question is going to cost a significant amount of money ( like, more than $500), make da__ed-sure it has a valid, negotiable title whose vehicle serial-number can be found somewhere on the vehicle itself.

If it doesn't have a clear title, than it's "value" might only be that of a parts-car at best, or "Scrap" at worst.

And a signed, "open" title from five owners ago might not be valid today( especially if the last legal owner signed in the wrong place and has passed away or disappeared), depending on what state you are living-in / going to register the car in...

It really rubs salt in a wound to pay big $$$ for a vehicle, then have to spend further time & aggravation to make it legally yours...

Good luck to you !

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Hey, you say the seller is the son of the 3rd owner..he might have special memories with the car that make the price higher...make sure to not pressure the price...learn the reason for it. If it's Barret Jackson walk away...If it's memories you have a chance :)

I recently bought a 28 mclaughlin Buick from a family that had "emotional attachement value" added to the price of the car and after several meetings regarding the non-running, older restoration I added a free ride in it when I got it running. As promised I trailered it back over 200 miles and pulled in the driveway in their old car...all waxed and running (after 20+ years in the barn) ....that was priceless to them. I recently got a call from them regarding the 25 dodge that was also in the barn...did I want it? Long story short I now have a 25 dodge touring too. :)

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Nada always seemed a little high to me both from a buying and selling standpoint. I have never been able to pull a NADA price out of a car. I like Old Cars Price guide. Seems fairly accurate on common cars. More unusual cars that don't trade hands often are always hard to put a real value one.

The thing I have always found is the cars always fall between the number conditions with OCPG. I always seem to find a 4 with a new interior so the itnerior is a 2 but the paint is a 4 the chrome might be a 3 and who knows what the mechanics are so it's always hard to put a firm number on something. I paid number 3 plus condition for my non running 1936 Chrysler Roadster. I think it would be hard to buy one and drive it home looking good for 18500. If you find one let me know. I'll add it to my collection.

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Several times I've purchased vehicles which were in my opinion, priced significantly below market value. Of course, I paid full asking price, already realizing that I was getting a great deal. Knowing other persons in the car 'hobby' they would have not been able to resist trying to get them at a lower price yet. I just can't do that.

On the other hand, trying to help a friend sell a car right now, he paid $5k several years ago, barely drove it and let it sit outside for a while causing some paint, vinyl top deterioration. Otherwise the car is fine; original paint, shiny chrome, very solid/rust free & loaded with options. Starting to need a muffler but drives great.

Owing him a favor or three, I cleaned it up, replaced/repaired a couple parts (battery, starter, carb & fuel pump - danged deathanol!) and offered it for sale. I've had a couple people try to bargain down from the $2500 asking price telling me that it'll need paint and a vinyl top and explain how much those will cost. Really?!?!? As if it weren't obvious. If the car did not need that work the price would be much higher - condition and current market was already taking into consideration when pricing the car. Price is negotiable for a couple hundred but $1500 won't drive the car away.

Based on a $1500 offer from pics, one of the potential buyers wants to see the car in person but I haven't been inclined to re-arrange my schedule on his behalf. He was very respectful when he made the offer and I declined in a polite manner. Working from there hopefully we can come to an agreement when we get together, perhaps this afternoon he can drive away with the car.

Then along comes some guy who wants the car BAD. He's called, texted, emailed - annoyed the heck out of me. Has the money, he's coming over tomorrow, Sunday, whenever he can get a ride (50 miles). Then he's not coming, doesn't have the money, won't have it until the 1st when he gets his SSI check, had to pay his rent/got an eviction notice, his cable bill, he's the sole support for his 2 year old daughter?!?!?

I won't sell the car to him for at least a couple reasons which can be inferred by reading the past couple sentences.

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Update:

The car in question that prompted this thread is still for sale--about nine months now. Still same price.

If the car is for sale when I get back, maybe I'll make my offer.

PP

y

Why can't you make an offer? Just do it and start a dialogue.

I inquired 4 months ago on the Imperial On-Line website regarding 3 1960 Imperials close by me in Iowa.

Problem was the seller had little information and NO PRICE. Talk about anguish. Desirable cars close by, worth the call?

I called and the guy was a talker, went on for over one hour, yackety yack. Finally I asked for price and he said $20,000 and $15,000 yada yada yada.

And that's fine but I buy $1,000 to $3,000 type cars. That's an hour + I won't get back. Left the call with no commitment. Brain numb from listening.

Today he calls me back to gauge interest (4 months later) He has had no serious interest (imagine that) and asked where I stood. I said "R*****t, I can't afford the prices you asked so I did not pursue it." he revised one price to $8,000 for the "project car". Still, about $5,000 more then I can afford and that I believe the market would bear.

I don't know how to get buyers and sellers together when the sellers have seen the "investor bubbles of the late 1980's and again recently. They see dollar signs. I see good times enjoying the cars, not in making a buck off my fellow hobbyists.

In the last 10 years though I have become expert at just being honest. There are too many cars out there, not enough time.

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  • 2 months later...

UPDATE:

We made an offer on this car a couple days ago (my father did the negotiating-he is a real easy going guy who has negotiated bigger deals than an old car purchase). Everything went well--no bad things happened. As expected, the seller refused our offers. In fact, the seller's responses to our offers seemed well practiced and he sighed just before launching into his response. We came up $1,500 from our initial offer; he came down $700. Had he come down as much as we went up, something might have happened (we would be in the same ball park at least).

He had his two teen sons with him when we looked at the car. When we made the initial offer, one of the sons abruptly turned and left the area, which we thought was kind of weird. My father asked the seller (son of the deceased owner) what he would take for the car. After a good long time--well over a minute--he came down $700 from his asking price. My father asked what he was basing his asking price on. He replied that that was what he was asking and as far as he was concerned the car could sit for another 20 years (the car has not run since 1991). My father says that this comment indicated to him that the guy really does not want to sell the car.

The seller seems to have the notion that the car will appreciate steadily in the coming years. He could not be further from the reality. The car is sitting in an unheated dirt floor warehouse on the premises of a heavy duty industrial business. Forklifts and large trucks move through the warehouse daily. Something has already fallen on the car, damaging the roof slightly. The seller stated that the car will be worth more than his current asking price later on. Not likely even if stored correctly. The car will deterioate further if it is kept under the current conditions. This was pointed out to him but he dismissed the suggestion. It is a shame. One thing is for sure--the car will continue to deteriorate and suffer further damage if it stays in the warehouse.

The seller seemed like a nice enough guy, he just doesn't know what he is talking about when it comes to the market value of some of the cars he inherited. The car in question has been for sale for one year. Something is only worth what some one is willing to pay for it, something the seller does not know or chooses to ignore. The teen grand sons will surely inherit this car.

Thanks to all who responded.

PP

Edited by Pomeroy41144 (see edit history)
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In today's depressed market, even if a car is a "no charge gift", it is almost always less costly to locate a restored same car (at today's prices), if such a car can be found. Your search should be nationally, not locally. I try to find vehicles within a 6 or 8-hour drive, as like to see them in person. I also find that it is better to buy a car from a car collector, rather than from relatives of a deceased former owner, as the relatives are thinking in Barrett-Jackson terms. In their mind, their 4-door sedan that has been sitting in a garage for years has almost the same value as a restored convertible that they saw going through the B-J auction last year or year before. You will be unable to convince them otherwise in most cases and your offer will often be taken as an insult, even though realistic.

Restoration costs (especially chrome and paint) are skyrocketing to the point of no return, and unless a very special car (convertibles and 2-door hard tops are usually best with some exceptions of course), it is no longer economically possible to restore a car and be even close to today's values. However convincing the average person of this is highly unlikely.

The problem is with sellers who are probably not aware of realistic pricing at present. My son and I have a small car museum in Canfield, Ohio www.tpcarcollection.com)

and have purchased a few cars duriing the past year or so. We have done better at small local auctions, and in the last year have found some really nice cars at about half the price of just 2 or 3 years back. Buying from an individual who knows nothing about the antique car market and/or values is almost impossible. There is nothing worse than an uninformed seller.

Fred

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a fair offer will get a return just like the cadillac guy. i always remain polite in negotiations and that seems to always be worth something. if you know of other cars the same and priced well and in better condition then you have the advantage. perhaps [ just this one time] your wife is right and you should get something to enjoy now and perhaps fix up slowly as you use it. i once bought a car that i paid $6000 too much for and i knew it when i bought it. however, it was a car of which only 500 were ever produced, it was in driver condition and it was the same model car i used to drive when i was 17 and i was looking for that car and the chances of finding another were slim to none. the seller had it stored for the last 22 years and he was a wealthy man with no great motivation to sell. i still have that car and drive it often. however, any other car purchase i have made involved negotiation and i absolutely am able to and have walked away when price was too high. when you walk away you feel as if you have lost something you will never see again, but then something else does come along, often better. do not hesitate to negotiate well, but walk away when necessary and you will either find another or he will be calling you wanting to deal in the not too distant future. tha advice you got here is sound. take it and use it well. do not throw money away on an emotional purchase when you can spend it on a sensible purchase. capt den

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No Steve, what it really comes down to is, "How bad do I want to buy it?"

or, "How bad do I want to sell it?":);)

Wayne

Have had quite a few chuckles in reading (and rereading) this thread; but of all the advice given, I think Wayne's post is the most accurate.

Whether the item is a car, or a coin, or a piece of real estate or another type of collectible or a business; and whether the individual is a buyer or a seller matters not. What really matters is: "What is this item worth to me?".

If the seller and buyer agree, there is a transaction; if they don't, there isn't. Really pretty simple. And the Queen's English comes into play. The buyer can ask, "Is this your absolute bottom dollar?" giving the seller a chance to respond; AND the seller can respond with "What will you offer now for an immediate sale?" giving the buyer a chance to respond. No guides, no third parties, no insults; just two individuals negotiating.

Jon.

Edited by carbking (see edit history)
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Here is the opposite: Seller insults buyer.

I telephoned a man in Wisconsin today to talk about his 1934 Ford Fordor which was being advertised for sale in a recent issue of a very popular collector car selling magazine. The man was not home, so I left a message. The man called back this afternoon. He spent the first few minutes telling me how 38 people had called about the car but not one person has showed up at the house to take a look at the car. Okay.

I have a list of questions that I ask when I call about a car, the answers which I write down as I speak to a seller. I also have notes so that I can keep track of who I call and when. When I asked him to hang on while I got my notes, he asked "Notes?" "What the heck do you need notes for?" I then patiently explained to him why I took notes when doing the calling.

I began to ask questions. I could not get past the question without him interupting or adding something non sensical to the conversation. First he assumed that I was a hotrodder (I am not). And after every other comment he would say "I know that this is not the car you are looking for." After a couple times I finally had to ask him how on earth he knew what I was looking for. He answered that question with the question "How old are you?" Finally getting fed up with this man's nonsense I asked, "Just what I am looking for? Tell me so that I will know too." He told me that a hot rodder would snatch this car up soon so I better come look if I was serious and then launched into some bs about the Hot Rod Nationals which he evidently attended recently. After he again told me that this was not the car I was looking for I took his word for it. I said thanks for calling back, good luck and good bye. No wonder 38 guys took a pass on visting him--that would be 39 now. After 15 minutes, he answered two questions about the car--it is black and don't run, other than that it was non-stop assumptions and nonsense on his part.

PP

Edited by Pomeroy41144 (see edit history)
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POM, this could be a case of spiting yourself, though. Because the man is not a good communicator, it seems better that you look at it to see for yourself. It might be that it is a

better deal than you think, and since he scared everyone away, mmmm? Just a thought.

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POM, this could be a case of spiting yourself, though. Because the man is not a good communicator, it seems better that you look at it to see for yourself. It might be that it is a

better deal than you think, and since he scared everyone away, mmmm? Just a thought.

Perhaps, but I don't have time growing on trees. I would rather not drive all the way up there at this time of year to confirm my initial impression (and that of 38 guys before me) that this guy is just not worth dealing with. It was not that he was not a good communicator--he was able to communicate well--it was what he said and how he said it that put me off (I was extremely patient with him). Time to move on.

PP

Edited by Pomeroy41144 (see edit history)
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Canadian1925touring Re: Offer Insults Seller

<hr style="color:; background-color:" size="1"> ... "special memories with the car that make the price higher"... If it's memories you have a chance :)

I recently bought a 28 McLaughlin Buick from a family that had "emotional attachement value" added to the price of the car and after several meetings regarding the non-running, older restoration I added a free ride in it when I got it running. As promised I trailered it back over 200 miles and pulled in the driveway in their old car...all waxed and running (after 20+ years in the barn) ....that was priceless to them. I recently got a call from them regarding the 1925 Dodge that was also in the barn...did I want it? Long story short I now have a '25 Dodge touring too. :)

I recently had a lengthy talk with a fellow who purchased a 1929 Pontiac Coach that I helped a friend work on. The daughter (who I went to school with) had inherited the car and of course it was the "emotional ties and the memories" that were important to her not really wanting to sell the car! He told her that she would always have the memories ~ he wanted just the car. After some time had gone by, he was able to buy the car. He was sincere and respectful of the family, the memories and the car and I know that the daughter has had a ride or two in said Pontiac Coach! :) A Happy Ending.

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