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I'm researching interior color options for my 1936 Dodge D2 4Dr. I'm leaning towards the Dodge Blue (which I've also seen listed in Limosine Blue). Is there a source of reference where I can look at interior colors and determine if the exterior color limited the interior colors.

The original material in this car is a light brown/tan. It is completely rotten, although the rear passenger trim pannel is in good enough shape to replicate. It still has the buttons on it that holds one of the decorative trim borders about four inches below the window.

Thank you!

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Hey "2nd Owner",

Were you aware that you can send your car's "Serial Number" (from the plate on the right front door hinge pillar) to the "Chrysler Historical Collection" and it is very likely they will be able to find and copy the original factory "Build Card" which is a record of all the detail on your car - including original color and interior selection?

There are a couple other posts in this section with extensive info on how to do this. I think it still only costs about $45.00. See: http://forums.aaca.org/f143/chrysler-historical-298170.html

And also check out: Walter P. Chrysler Museum

Almost all of the '36 D2's I have seen have the "taupe" colored interior (a blend of tan and gray). The only other I saw was a 7 Passenger Sedan and an open car with leather. An example of the headliner material is in this eBay auction: DODGE 1936-1952 CLOTH HEADLINER NEW IN PACKAGE - eBay (item 310265767728 end time May-25-11 13:52:47 PDT) . The correct color is like the first photo or the 1st sample in the second row of samples called "beige". Those are the closest for the headliner as my eye sees it. The rest of the interior is a similar set of colors in mohair (for the greatest bulk of 4Dr Touring Sedans).

Edited by 1936 D2 (see edit history)
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1936 D2, Thanks again. I know what the original color is as the interior trunk still has it showing in very good shape, it is one of the gray's. Also, I saw the original color of the interior when I took the sun visors down off the header panel this weekend.

My question is, if I decide to change it to Dodge Blue (as the gray color really does look like primer) were there other interior options or where they all the light brown color. The headliner that you pointed me to seems like a decent price, I'm just wondering if I will be able to match the rest of the interior to an ordered headliner, or if I would be better off just getting everything done at one place, because I understand that interior trim panels are not available and will have to be done at an upolstery shop.

Thank you sir!

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"Dolphin Gray" is probably your original color then.

See: DuPont color chip chart for '36 Dodge for another sample of color chips for our cars. These are DuPont colors. The others I linked to earlier were Ditzler colors. (BTW: This Gray color doesn't really look like primer once you get done with it. It is a metallic color (as are all the Dodge colors except for Limo Blue and Black) and seems more like some of the lighter grays you see on modern cars except the metallic is VERY FINE in the paint. I think it was referred to as "Ultra Fine" when my color was mixed. This Dolphin Gray seems to be a sort of rare color too. Looking at some of the other color charts around 1936, the other grays were a different blend and name for other years. I think the Dolphin Gray may have been a one year color!) See the attached photo of a gray car to get an idea of the color.

Again, the only interior color I have ever seen on 4Dr Touring Sedans is the beige that you have uncovered in your car. Those places, like under the visor hinge pads, would be the best places for color samples as they were never open to sun fading. that spot, if not tinted by rust or the glue, will be a good sample of the headliner as the same fabric was used on this header panel. The actual door and seat material is a bit different in shade, as is the carpet and lower kick panels on the doors. Darker as you go down. This beige color looks good with pretty much all the Dodge paint colors for '36 as most all of those colors were of an "earthy" tone. The brightest may have been the "Stratosphere Blue" or the "Mercury Metallic" and both of those even look OK with the beige interior.

I think from this info you have a good idea as to the colors. Try to find a piece of material that was folded under the seat springs or along side the back seat arm rests for the seat and door panel color. The carpet is a rather darker brown version of this seat color and has a much coarser pile to it.

I have not seen anywhere on the web yet that does a good version of the fabric colors. You may have to rely on photos from people with original upholstery in their vehicles.

I will try to set up some shots of mine so a fair comparison of the color can be viewed through the computer screen. But be aware, this is a bit of a guess as my screen's colors may (does) look different than yours, for sure. They are not exact - but close. My full interior is original. ;)

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Edited by 1936 D2
Added info. (see edit history)
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1936 D2, When you say original interior, do you mean the interior that was put in the car when it was first sold, or it has all been replaced with like original material? If it is the original interior that came from the factory, I would love to hear how it stayed so nice. Especially if the "original one" is the same one of the vent windows that you provided a link to in my other post.

Mine is all original as well, but it is rotten and will have to be replaced. I bumped my head on the rubber protectors that were on the roof screws that you referred to in your post to Grumpyone about the roof. They are still very soft.

Do you know if the first several support ribs for the headliner (first four starting from the front going back) went the entire length of the roof. I'm assuming they did, but mine were about 8 to 10 inches long and looked to have a clean cut on them which either someone did after they broke or it was factory. I started to guess that maybe it was the same metal for the headliner for the 1935 that didn't have the metal roof insert and there was some other way for the headliner to stay attached to the roof. The final two supports were still clipped to the roof with the clips (in tact) and the metal rods were the entire width of the roof. We also figured out that they must have put the support ribs in first, then the trim pannels on the sides, then fastened the rest of the headliner and then put the trim strip above the doors.

As an aside, did you have your wood grain redone, and if so, was it by Benny Estes? If so, my father in law was a close personal friend of his and even accompanied him to Carlise on a couple of occasions I believe.

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2nd Owner, How's it going? I would suggest getting the headliner from that company that I recommended. They are made with near original fabrics and authentic colors and will fit. You also have to order some extra material for the rear sail panels , front header panel, sun visors and glove box. The color that best matches is a light camel color. It goes well with most of the brown or tan (real) mohair fabrics on the market. The metal rods support the sides of the liner and do not extend across the body in the front. There are 2 full length rods above the rear window. The main liner strips are nailed to 4 wooden bows. One in front , 2 in the middle(which also serve to support the dome lamp) and one nearer the rear. These bows have a padding on to to keep them from rubbing on the roof. The big bumpers are to protect your head and the liner from the roof bolts. The rear sail panels( the parts of the liner that wrap around the rear window and qtrs.) were made from formed cardstock and covered with fabric. The top of this panel I believe tucks in behind the nail strip and in between the rear window and qtr. window garnish mouldings and the sides are nailed to the tack strip along the body. The front header is screw in and finishes it off. After installation of the int. panels the seams are covered with a "wire on" trim strip which is nailed on then folded over. It will be hard to get a good match on wire -on and windlacing as colors and pattern are limited. The coachlace on the doors and seats( the thin piping above the pleats) will probably have to be made. Bill Hersch and Lebaron Bonny have very good fabrics avail. Call them for sample cards. Any questions feel free to call! Jim

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It must be quite a job to install a headliner like this. I'll be looking for some professional help when that time comes (most likely down the road a little bit). I'm going to re-examine my headline to see if I can determine where it was nailed.....

I still have the card stock for the rear sail panels (just removed them yesterday)! It was impressive to see all of the fine craftsman ship that went into the interior (still obvious, despite the state of the material).

My roof only has rubber bumpers on the roof bolts on the back, were these present on all roof bolts?

jpage, thanks for all your time on the phone the other night.

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Excellent description of the headliner by "jpage". That's how I remember it!

The only rubber bumpers were in the back. You have them all. The padding between the wood bows and the top insert was the standard jute that was used in the seats, by the firewall and below the carpeting.

Be sure to fully check the top seal while you have the headliner out. This is a good time to give it the "water test" and make sure it does not leak. (Probably doesn't!) If you were to send in for your "Build Card" with the "Chrysler Historical Collection", you will find out the interior trim package by number. I am suspecting it will be #292 "Pile" which shows the color #302 for the 62" headliner, #395 for the lace, binding and welt, taupe for the 54" body trim cloth and #394 for the 40" leather fabric carpet. "CHC" may send you a listing of what these color numbers mean when you get your "Build Card". If you are changing the paint color, you should probably find someone who got the "Build Card" for their original "Dodge Blue" car and see what that says about interior trim colors. I have the info in my "Preliminary Parts Manual" for what is in the different types of trim number listings, but there is no description of what the associated color numbers mean.

Yes - the interior in my car is all original. It stayed nice because the car was stored inside all its days! The interior was removed for re-painting then put back in. The headliner was not fully removed, just the edges and then pinned back for the painting job. That helped keep it in the correct place later. The woodgraining on the garnish trim is all original. The trim you see in the linked photos of the quarter windows is all original, as is the woodgraining. I did not do anything to the garnish mouldings and all I did to the dash was to carefully sand it with 3000 grit and then overspray it with a clear polyurethane to protect it. I was able to find a guy making the wood grained decals to place on the re-chromed parts of the dash. They matched the painted graining perfectly! I have not heard of this guy with the decals for over 20 years so I don't know if those decals are still available. I think I got really lucky with that! :D

Good thing those rubber bumpers were still there - and still working, 'eh? !!!

Your support ribs near the front are correct the way they are - short.

I have a series of photos (paper) of the operation during the removal of the interior. If you have any particular need for knowing how some particular part of the interior comes apart or goes back in, let me know and I can see if I have a photo of that area. Eventually I may be able to digitize them and post them on my internet photo share. (A lot of work!) :)

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Headliner installation isn't all that difficult if you're handy. Biggest problem is making sure it's centered side to side and front to back. A good headliner will have all the pockets and nail strips sewn in so front to back isn't a huge problem. You start in the middle and work your way out to the sides , gently pulling and tacking as you go. Pull just enough to remove wrinkles and not distort the shape. Some repro liners have the sail panels sewn onto them which may or may not ease installation as it's really hard to contour flat cardstock to fit the qtrs. Be careful too to keep the twisted paper tack strip intact. This is not available although there are several good subs. that will suffice. You'll also notice that there are 2 short metal plates covered with fabric on the rear face of the front doors between the door panel and the top of door. New clips are avail. for these should you need them. Also, save the old upholstery buttons as I'm not sure new ones of the same size are available. The buttons come apart and the uphols. fabric is sandwiched in between halves. I found one of the door check repair parts I can send as a sample if you like. Let me know your address. The carpet on the floor and on the bottom of the doors is the same material and color. Originally it's a heavy coarse material( horse or pig hair I think) and good subs. are available but only in 2 or 3 colors. The rear carpets are 3 separate pcs. : the center part over the driveshaft is nailed in and the inserts are fastened with floating pins crimped to the carpet. New fasteners are avail, thus the holes in the rear floor. I'm rambling but i'm noting as details pop in my head! Later Jim

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My headliner....., followed by a picture of the original wood grain rear vent window garnish molding

I have been wondering... Do you think the gray corduroy looking material on the back seat is the original stuff? Or is it a replacement seat cover of some kind? What's under there?

There is a "Bedford Cord" listed as a material for some of the versions of the '36 Dodge. I don't believe I have ever seen it though. Most all are "Pile" material.

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The parts book does show seats being trimmed in Bedford Cord , which is similar to a cordouroy , but I can't find any specific color listed. There are only 2 colors listed in the parts book. Code 550-color 2706 and code 558- color 558 but I do not know what they looked like. A broadcloth was also available in apparently 4 colors. I think the pile, or mohair, was standard equip. and the other styles were special order at extra cost. At a time when money was tight, cheaper was better than fancy for most people. Actually, last time I checked, the good mohair frabric was cheaper than the broadcloth or Bedford Cord. I also think that it looks richer but I would stick with real wool mohair and not with the cheaper valor substitutes. The real stuff looks more authentic but that's my preference. Lebaron has a nice gray mohair that matches several samples of windlace, carpet and headliner very nicely better than the tan. I susoect that most cars had a taupe interior regardless of exterior color.

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Nope. Sorry. No gray in either of my cars. Both had the tan / beige / taupe interior thing in "Pile". Just like your car then.

I was just curious if your car had the "Bedford Cord" style material. That would have been the first I had ever seen. So still, all the 4Dr Touring Sedans I have ever seen have the beige "Pile" style of interior, no matter what color they were on the outside. (Must have been the standard, no extra cost, interior offered then for the 4Dr TS.)

I will be posting up some photos, of the process of removing the interior prior to the paint job, soon. ;)

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Here are some shots of the removal of the interior prior to the minor body work and repaint. I work my way around the passenger's side from the front to the rear.

This car was originally black. My other (worse) one was "Mercury Metallic" according to the "Build Card". We matched that car's color for the repaint on this one. Initially (like for 16 years!!) we all thought the color that was matched was the "Stratosphere Blue". But according to the "Build Card" of that car we matched from, it is "Mercury Metallic". (Hmmm...) :eek:

There will be two sets of photos here in separate posts. Look for 'em! This is post #1 of 2.

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The exact gray color of the car in post #4 is unknown to me. This was a "sample" photo I found to help show you what the original gray of your car MAY have looked like (vs the shaker can color now on your car). I do not know how exact this gray looks but it is much closer than what your car looks like now. I would suspect this gray is very close to the "Dolphin Gray" as listed on the chip chart.

Most reputable "older" paint shops that carry DuPont products may have a color formula conversion table available to them. They can take the older color numbers or mix formulas and convert them into modern paint chemistry. If not, almost all shops can computer match a color if you have a good sample (like I did) and, with a bit of patience, can measure the metallic grain size (mine was called "Ultra Fine") in the paint to make a VERY close match to the original color and metallic glint.

Have fun with your research! ;)

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Attached are some photos of a '36 Dodge 7 Passenger Sedan (export car in a very hot climate - RH drive) that MAY give SOME idea as to what "Dodge Blue" or "Limousine Blue" looks like. I do know that it is NOT a metallic color and people have said it is so dark it almost looks Black. The color right over the speedometer on the flat part is probably the best sample. (The part over the filler panel to the right is too bright hence too light looking). In the other shot, the hinge edge of the door gives sort of an idea of the paint although it probably is just A BIT faded. This car is upholstered with leather. The leather color is probably made to be close or complimentary to the car's original paint color.

The interior shots are from another '36 Dodge 7 Passenger Sedan (domestic car in a very cold climate - well preserved) version. I show these because they are all original and a pretty good reference to the interior upholstery colors I suspect your car had. Again, this interior color setup is VERY common to all the Dodge exterior colors.

Hope this helps. They are the best shots I can come up with for these colors. Use them as a REFERENCE ONLY.

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Edited by 1936 D2 (see edit history)
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Whats the story with the jump seats? I like them

That's why they call it a seven passenger sedan.Two in front, two in the jump seats and three across the rear seat. The jump seats fold up against the front seat when not in use.

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Whats the story with the jump seats? I like them

These are photos of the '36 Dodge D2 7 Passenger Sedan model. Or as the foreigners call it, a "Limo". The front doors are from a Two Door Sedan, The back doors are special for the "Limo" only and the top is NOT a steel insert like other '36 Sedans. It is the older cloth style top like on the '35's!

Cool, 'eh? :cool:

("Keiser31" beat me again!) :P

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I see, dosent look like theres much legroom for the back seat. I wonder if this was the first Dodge to offer the jumpseats?

No. I would think there were 7 Passenger Sedans prior to '36 but - you know - I'm not sure. I have been surprised in the past. ;)

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