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Steve_Mack_CT

Most Underrated Car's

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I generally stay with what I have parts for. At one point that was almost all Pontiac 400s (now just have one car but two spare engines). Now it is Buick 3800s. Do feel that cars in their twenties are generally the "best buys" because they have little "cred". Yet. Are enough "beaters" on the market to keep the prices of nice ones down. Keep in mind that at one point you could buy a real Duesy for under $1,000 because of the expense to maintain.

Must admit an attraction to very low production cars & prefer upscale with a manual transmission which eventually becomes "rare" add in a requirement for a/c (everything in the sig has a/c) & numbers go way down.

Guess in some ways I am still looking for the '59 XK-150S I paid $1500 for & got me through college but 3800s come close.

Right now am vacillating about an Allante (talk about undervalued...). These are the good old days.

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I like the 30s Auburn and was considering buying one, but they are just too small for me. Great styling though. And you can get a Packard 120 convertible for ~$60K which seems very reasonable. Also the 32 Packard light eight seems to be quite a bargain at <$100K.

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This is a fun thread, I might as well throw my hat into this ring. I agree with the comments that luxury and near luxury cars are often the most undervalued. Luxury cars are always undervalued when compared to muscle cars of the same era, especially when you consider that the luxury cars often got bigger engines than the smaller lighter Mustangs, Cudas, Chevelles etc did. Cadillacs have developed a strong following though, leaving the rest, particularly the near-luxury prestige brands holding the bag. Full-size Buicks and Oldses of almost any era are undervalued, IMO, but here are some specifics:

-1940's era Buicks, not including convertibles. Often very nice, well preserved original drivers can be had at or near $10,000.

-1959-60 Olds and Buicks, again convertibles notwithstanding. Sure, they may not be the most beautiful or iconic of cars from the period, but those are some beautiful and unique designs.

-1964 and later Imperials. The 50's and early 60's Imperial have at least some following, but the square Imperials often seem to go wanting at five grand. The 60's Imperials have a reputation as some of the safest and most reliable cars of the time too, not to mention the fact that Imperials always sold in smaller numbers than Cadillacs or Lincolns.

-I think someone already mentioned this, but 1977-79 Lincoln Town Cars and Town Coupes. Original, well-optioned examples with very low miles can be had for well under ten grand.

-1977-90 B/D-body GM cars, particularly the Buicks and Oldses. Sure, they were all the same, but they are reliable and generally well-made for the time. Supply is likely a factor as to why prices haven't risen, but as time goes on I can especially see the earlier (ie: 1977-79) examples becoming collectible, since those were the years with the bigger engines available. The HT-4100 Cadillacs here notwithstanding.

-Lastly, I'd like to second the Lincoln Mark VII. They are great, reliable cars with style, class and a lot of features for their time. Plus, they don't have a lot of the problems that the later Mark VIII's did.

Edited by Gman1023
Clarification (see edit history)

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Not the rear wheel drive Buick and Olds from 1980 to whenever the front drive cars took over and got rid of that awful lockup torque converter. I had a 1981 Olds 98 Regency Coupe that was a beautiful car, very low mileage and well styled but I couldn't stand the lockup torque converter. Somehow I forgot the awful 1980 Buick Century I bought new. Wayne Burgess has the Olds now and loves it. I have a high mileage 1969 Buick Electra convertible now without a lock up torque converter and I'd rather pay for the gas.

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There were (maybe still are) available new memory calibration program read only memory (PROM) chips available that would minimize the converter lock up "chuggle"

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Not the rear wheel drive Buick and Olds from 1980 to whenever the front drive cars took over and got rid of that awful lockup torque converter. I had a 1981 Olds 98 Regency Coupe that was a beautiful car, very low mileage and well styled but I couldn't stand the lockup torque converter. Somehow I forgot the awful 1980 Buick Century I bought new. Wayne Burgess has the Olds now and loves it. I have a high mileage 1969 Buick Electra convertible now without a lock up torque converter and I'd rather pay for the gas.

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Those lock up converters were great for mileage, but on hills they were always hunting going in and out of lock up wearing the clutch out. The converters would hunt back and forth and most people just drove them without concern until failure. On the first and every one I've had since all I would do is get to the A/T harness and put a switch in to control when it would lock up. After that little operation they would last as long as any A/T.

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Those lock up converters were great for mileage, but on hills they were always hunting going in and out of lock up wearing the clutch out. The converters would hunt back and forth and most people just drove them without concern until failure. On the first and every one I've had since all I would do is get to the A/T harness and put a switch in to control when it would lock up. After that little operation they would last as long as any A/T.

I had a serious lock up converter on an 80 Caprice that I put a switch on. I've been used to shifting gears all my life, so I just knock the automatics in 3rd gear now when going through towns.:confused:

My youngest son did that last year while driving a friend's car. Freaked the owner out. He had never seen anyone shift an automatic before.:P

"You sure you're not going to tear the tranny out of my old car????":o

Wayne

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So I ran though a good portion of this thread and can't believe this is not here, (I must have missed this one but I swear I thought it!)

Closed Full Classics. Like this Packard Super 8 that is for sale right on the forum:

http://forums.aaca.org/f119/1937-packard-super-8-sale-304552.html

This is one of many examples of closed cars that are Full Classics you can aqcuire and enjoy for under $25K.

BTW Wayne, thanks for posting that picture - should help Misako sell the car because a picture is worth a thousand words for sure...

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....................Closed Full Classics. Like this Packard Super 8 that is for sale right on the forum:

http://forums.aaca.org/f119/1937-packard-super-8-sale-304552.html

This is one of many examples of closed cars that are Full Classics you can aqcuire and enjoy for under $25K.

BTW Wayne, thanks for posting that picture - should help Misako sell the car because a picture is worth a thousand words for sure...

Thanks Steve. I'm afraid it will get lost in the rush, but it would not be fair to other posters to pin it.:(

Wayne

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Good point from Steve, it is certainly possible to get a full Classic sedan at a relative bargan price.

I guess Classic or postwar we could say as a group all four doors are underrated. I have always said the guy with a $5000 four door can go participate in the same car show as the guy with the $50,000 convertible and have just as much fun for 10% of the price. The convertible guy may never even put his top down either. Todd

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I feel I have to throw in my opinion here. I am only 22 so I am not as knowledgable as some of you other members. But in my personal opinion I think the later years of the classic GTO is underrated. When I had to sell mine I had to try to sell the guy because his wife wanted a classic mustang. My dog wants a classic mustang. The GTO is just in a class of its own.

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Helfen, You are correct. The Rometch is a beautiful true coach build with VW running gear. I accessed the web address attached to your earlier comment. Thanks.

Bob Shaill, England resident, published a book awhile back that described VW running gear based coach builts. A superb book. Bob is a very knowledgeable Volkswagen historian. At one time he published a bi-monthly magazine that dealt primarily with Volkswagens from the 30tys through the 50tys. The 60tys era was there once in awhile, but never the 70tys as I recall.

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Helfen, You are correct. The Rometch is a beautiful true coach build with VW running gear. I accessed the web address attached to your earlier comment. Thanks.

Bob Shaill, England resident, published a book awhile back that described VW running gear based coach builts. A superb book. Bob is a very knowledgeable Volkswagen historian. At one time he published a bi-monthly magazine that dealt primarily with Volkswagens from the 30tys through the 50tys. The 60tys era was there once in awhile, but never the 70tys as I recall.

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Jim, I know the guy in the picture I posted. You should see that car in person! He also has a Kubelwagen and I think a Hebmueller

http://www.centralcoastvwclub.com/images/stories/3.jpg

Don

Edited by helfen (see edit history)

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