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92 park ave supercharger please help


Guest rollings22

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Guest rollings22

i just recently bought a 92 buck park ave. ultra and i am curiouis as to how to change the oil in the super charger and also what type of oil do i use in it, i have heard and read that is a type of mineral oil, and also for some reason at a higher rpm the car with chug down and cut out, im not quite sure what it is possibly an 02 sensor or the sensor in that is attached to the intake? please help with any ideas as to what that could be

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Have you located the plug on the supercharger? It is about the size of a nickle with a internal hex fitting. The oil is supposed to be up to the threads. The plug is on the side of the snout that supports the pulley.

GM sells a special "snake oil" for the supercharger, I suspect that it is available from other sources for less.

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And then the stinky stuff has to come out, best way, I've seen is to use the squirter from a window cleaner or some such and pump the stuff into a container that you can get rid of it in, hopefully to the oil recycler. The GM special oil is not cheap, but you need 2 little bottles. Most dealers stock it, as there's just a few of these cars out there yet, hard to kill them!! Hope that helps!!!!!!:)

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The first year for the SC3800, there was NO way to change the oil in the SC unit. After that first year, the plug mentioned is where you do it. Supposed to be changed something like every 50K miles, but nobody ever does. ONLY oil I've ever seen for the SC unit is from GM . . . "Supercharger Oil". NOTHING "snakey" about it, Barney!

Might check for a clogged catalytic converter, on the higher-rpm issue. Of mufflers for a loose baffle, too.

Enjoy!

NTX5467

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Guest rollings22

well i brought the car into a shop, and they replaced the mass air flow sensor and i also had the crank sensor replaces, that helped alot with the stalling and studdering but still everyonce in awhile while driving between 75 an 80 it will kinda choke like its missing and feels like its struggling to stay at that speed, and thanks i was able to find the plug on the sc but now i got to find a way to get the stripped plug out

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Guest sintid58

By the way this is my son Robert. He went from a 94 Honda to this Park Avenue so I hope it starts running better than it has.

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Any noise out of the fuel tank area? A fuel pump "whine"??

Has the fuel pressure been tested? Usually a fuel pump/pressure issue will result in "extended crank time" (as the fuel pump slowly builds enough pressure to fire the injectors). This might also result in lower power, sometimes, when the pump might need to supply more fuel.

At the least, you might look to see if the fuel filter looks "recent". Remember to discharge the fuel pressure BEFORE you take the filter loose from the fuel lines!

Seems like there are some flex lines between the engine and the chassis. Possibly some internal restrictions in one of them?

Otherwise . . . there were some model years of Buick 3800s that used particular brands of ignition systems. One had three separate coils as the other one had a unified coil setup. One was more prone to "issues" than the other. Not sure if this might apply to your car or not, or if the model years are correct. Just remembering that what can appear to be a fuel system issue can also be an ignition system issue . . . just like the old days.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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Thanks, Rawja, for that information. I remember that one was more trouble-prone than the other and that the Magavox (where's the Wurlitzer???) was the more troublesome one. Seems like it was in the module design or something like that?

Other main issue back then was the Mass Air Flow sensor. The car could quit while running down the road. When the particular cars came in with this complaint, the TSB mentioned "The Tap Test", where with the engine running at idle, you "tapped" the MAF with a screwdriver handle. If the engine stopped, it "Failed" and was replaced. If the engine kept running, you looked elsewhere for the problem. Most failed.

Then, with progressing age, the counterweight on the inside of the bottom pulley/harmonic balancer could become "loose" and swing freely (mounted in a ball bearing!), resulting some loud clanks and such. An easy-to-diagnose situation. Easy to fix, too.

Also, the "Interrupter" would fall out of the cam drive sproket. A small, round magnet held inside of a plastic cage. Had to remove enough stuff to get to the cam sproket, then fish the interrupter out and replace it.

Many of these things, like the MAF and Interrupter were pretty much model-year-based, so it was easy to diagnose and advise the customer about. In the mean time, the little Buick V-6s just kept running reliably "forever" . . . except for these little bumps in the road.

Enjoy!

NTX5467

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