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Another Door Ajar Wire Location?


Guest Northwestsun

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Guest Northwestsun

Hi All,

Just joined forum... I got a '90 Reatta a couple of months ago and drive it everyday to work, which is about 60 miles round trip. Have done a headlight bellcrank, new capacitors in the radio, ABS accumulator (Pull a Part), and just installed new door speakers.

I also found a broken off door ajar switch and thought I would be clever and just short out the wires with a connector. The dash light is still on and yes, I did just discover the thread from several years ago. I don't want to pull the panel and go back into the door to cut the wires... is there another place to snip a wire to disable the annoying light?

Thanks so much for any ideas!

Northwestsun

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Guest Mc_Reatta

As you are now aware, the circuit should be open to simulate the door being properly closed.

Simplest way is to disconnect the connector to the switch inside the channel in the door.

Another location to find the gray/black wire to the switch to disable the circuit would be inside the right hand shroud on the outside wall of the passenger's footwell under the glovebox behind the carpet and pad. The wire would run from pin B4 of connector C200 under the right hand side of the instrument panel to the drivers door. See figure A on page 8A-201-17 and figure B on page 8A-201-11 of file 08A-16 in the FSM if that is really what you want to do.

Just make sure it is the only gray black wire or back track it to make sure it is the proper one your looking for. May be more than one there.

RAP power will not go off as stated when you open the door, but it will time out after about 10 minutes anyway.

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Guest Northwestsun

Thanks to all...

All things considered, it sounds like I ought to just go back into the door and replace the switch, though I can find no decent picture of where this is at in the FSM. (I have a '91 FSM as I couldn't come up with a '90.) The door panel is no picnic, though not as bad as the Allante I used to have!

Best source for a new switch?

Northwestsun :cool:

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Guest Northwestsun

Thanks guys! Somehow I missed that illustration in my earlier search. And that's a good lead on '90 info.

Northwestsun :)

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Guest Mc_Reatta

RockAuto has them at a good price if you can't find locally.

For some reason they call them the door jamb switch, but the picture shows them to be the ajar switch. They are different left vs. right.

This is a picture of an ajar switch not a jamb switch

post-55241-143138482359_thumb.jpg

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Guest Northwestsun

Very helpful... thanks so much!

I'm starting to feel like I really want to get inside that door again and mess with some wires. Oh, the joy! I'll look for the part this weekend.

:)

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Northwestsun

Quick update on my Door Ajar switch problem...

I was able to get the part locally at O-Reilly's for $12.99 and install it myself. (One of the more challenging small tasks on the car so far.) I ripped one of the fasteners from the door panel and was able to hot-glue it back on before re-installing. Hope I don't have to go back into the door again any time soon!

And it is nice not to have the "Door Ajar" light glaring away all the time!

Thanks again for all the help!

Northwestsun :)

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Guest Mc_Reatta

Want to come and do the same on one of my cars? :D

I've got one that broke its mount disconnected and waiting for me to procure another, and get psyched up for the challenge and pain of the job.

I like the feeling of not having bruised knuckles and cut fingers for a change.

Any lessons learned to give out that makes this job easier?

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Guest Northwestsun

I found multiple parts to the job that tested my patience...

The door panels in every car I've owned have been a special task. While these are easier than the Allante I owned they are still problematic.

I unscrewed the door lock and window switches rather than unplug them. Looks to me like broken plastic waiting to happen. Next, the fasteners for the nylon 'screws' can rip off the particle door panels very easily. I know you can order a set of tools, but I hate spending money for something I rarely use. I found my garden weed puller, taped the shaft, and it worked fairly well, though I still ripped one of the fasteners off the panel. Hot glue seemed to replicate the original glue.

The inner plastic sheeting is easy to rip or stretch... I used duct tape to stick it back on for reassembly.

But the job of getting the broken switch off and new one on was made for a child's hands, I think. The screw was 7mm, as I recall, and I fortunately had an open end wrench for the task, though a longer one would have made the job easier. I would buy a rachet if I had to do another one. (My smallest socket wrench would not fit with such minimal clearance.)

Hands seemed to not get too beat up. It just took a lot longer than I had anticipated, but then most car jobs do!

Hope this is helpful!

Dave ;)

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...But the job of getting the broken switch off and new one on was made for a child's hands, I think. The screw was 7mm, as I recall, and I fortunately had an open end wrench for the task, though a longer one would have made the job easier. I would buy a rachet if I had to do another one. (My smallest socket wrench would not fit with such minimal clearance.) ...

A 1/4" socket set (e.g, Craftsman 34861 - with the addition of 5.5mm and T15 Torx sockets) is almost essential for working on the Reatta. With it, a couple of screwdrivers, and a pry bar or two, you can take quite a bit of the car apart and put it back together. There are places where a 3/8" set just won't fit.

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I unscrewed the door lock and window switches rather than unplug them. Looks to me like broken plastic waiting to happen. Next, the fasteners for the nylon 'screws' can rip off the particle door panels very easily. I know you can order a set of tools, but I hate spending money for something I rarely use. I found my garden weed puller, taped the shaft, and it worked fairly well, though I still ripped one of the fasteners off the panel. Hot glue seemed to replicate the original glue.

The easiest way to remove the panel (IMHO) is to just take everything apart.

Before removing the panel from the door, remove all the switches. The lock/unlock, and the door handle cup. The window, seat and mirror switches (is it's a driver panel) from the chrome metal piece.

Then once you've done all that, start pulling the door panel away. Do it very carefully, and don't get heavy handed or impatient. If you brake a clip, you can also use fiberglass rosin to put them back on the panel.

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Guest Mc_Reatta

Thanks for the info.

Sounds like the direct approach was used. Not sure my fat hands will allow me to follow suit. Just reaching in to fetch the switch head and pull it out to verify that the hole for the screw was gone was a challenge.

Tried to reach in and feel for the screw head on the latch, but couldn't get to it. Swinging a wrench in there seems like an impossible task.

Was wondering if disconnecting the linkages from the latch and unmounting the latch to move it closer to the opening was a more viable option, or if removing the window regulator and motor to open up that access to the inner door might be worth it. May not have to fully remove the regulator, just move it up out of the way and remove the short cross track from its place in the door to get a large enough hole to get the wrench, hand and arm in there to be able to at the latch.

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Guest Northwestsun

I too wondered about unscrewing the latch to see ifI could get a clearer 'path' to the switch. Opted not to do that and just spent time flipping my small offset wrench over and over to get best angle on the screw. (I did have a 1/4 inch socket wrench but even that was too big!)

I remember jamming the new switch from the outside to hold it in place as I put the screw back in. The screw eventually caught and after a good number of flips on the wrench it was tight.

I also cut the wires on the new switch and soldered to the old wires, covering with heat shrink tubing. Just didn't want to have to peal back any more of the plastic sheeting.

Dave

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