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Hi all: Anyone know of a modern replacement oil filter element that fits into the original '36 President "F-1" canister? I believe the original element was a Fram C-1, but my local auto parts store had no knowledge of the C-1, nor any suggestion regarding an interchange.

If not an exact replacement, perhaps there's another modern cartridge that with some shimming, could be made to work. Any insights welcomed. Regards, Bill. (I grimace at the thought of mounting a modern, spin-on adaptor and filter.......).

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Hi all: Anyone know of a modern replacement oil filter element that fits into the original '36 President "F-1" canister? I believe the original element was a Fram C-1, but my local auto parts store had no knowledge of the C-1, nor any suggestion regarding an interchange.

If not an exact replacement, perhaps there's another modern cartridge that with some shimming, could be made to work. Any insights welcomed. Regards, Bill. (I grimace at the thought of mounting a modern, spin-on adaptor and filter.......).

This should match your filter-if not find the oldest parts store in your area and have a real parts man look it up in a catalog not a computer. The Fram F-1 canister was used on many vehicles for years. I believe the number changed later on to C100

WIX

<table border="0" cellpadding="2" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr valign="top"><td class="blackmedium" width="130">Part Number:</td> <td class="blackmedium">51001</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">UPC Number:</td> <td class="blackmedium">765809510012</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">Principal Application:</td> <td class="blackmedium">GMC Trucks (60-61), Clark Ross Lift-Trucks, Detroit, Gray Marine</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">

</td> <td class="blackmedium">All Applications</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">Style:</td> <td class="blackmedium">Cartridge Lube Metal Canister Filter</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">Service:</td> <td class="blackmedium">Lube</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">Type:</td> <td class="blackmedium">By-Pass</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">Media:</td> <td class="blackmedium">Depth</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">Height:</td> <td class="blackmedium">5.500</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">Outer Diameter:</td> <td class="blackmedium">3.718</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">Inner Diameter Top:</td> <td class="blackmedium"> 0.480 </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="blackmedium">Inner Diameter Bottom:</td> <td class="blackmedium"> 0.552 </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">

<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="250"> <tbody><tr><td colspan="4" class="blackmedium" align="center">Gasket Diameters</td></tr> <tr> <td class="blackmedium" align="center">Number</td> <td class="blackmedium" align="center">O.D.</td> <td class="blackmedium" align="center">I.D.</td> <td class="blackmedium" align="center">Thk.</td> </tr> <tr bgcolor="#ffffff" height="25" valign="bottom"> <td class="blackmedium" align="center"> 15018 </td> <td class="blackmedium" align="center"> 4.687 </td> <td class="blackmedium" align="center"> 4.250 </td> <td class="blackmedium" align="center"> 0.062 </td> </tr> <tr bgcolor="#f2f2f2" height="25" valign="bottom"> <td class="blackmedium" align="center"> 15002 </td> <td class="blackmedium" align="center"> 4.421 </td> <td class="blackmedium" align="center"> 3.687 </td> <td class="blackmedium" align="center"> 0.062 </td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table>

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1936 and 1937 used the same oil filter-- a C-1. This changed to an F-1 in 1938. I managed to pick up a couple of spare C-1s the last 2-3 years, but am afraid I won't part with any since I will need them for the future. However, there is a fun replacement filter that uses a Chevy short spin on filter that fits inside the old C-1 canister. Right now I can't think of the gentleman back in Pennsylvania (I think) who thought up this clever device. Anyone know? It requires a bit of soldering to get the spin device mounted in the bottom of the big canister, but apparently, when done, you spin on the new filter, bolt the crazy 8 bolt top back on and are good to go. Help anywhere?

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