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Just Bought a 1925 Touring!


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  • 5 weeks later...

Re-doing the Axle oil seals and brakes. On one side the e-brakes were soaked with oil. After getting the correct spot facing tool it was pretty easy to rivet on the new linings. I 'm trying the McMaster Carr high strength, 0.5 coefficient of friction linings. These do have the brass wires woven in and were reasonably priced.

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There was a tool ( I can find the add if needed ) that would stretch the material around the circumfrence of the band as it was riveted that was used originally when attaching these linings. I do not know how necessary this is, I have a guy do mine, he did not use this tool and I never had any issues.

I would pull them tight though

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I must confess for being too lazy to go in and get the camera whilst I was doing these. I promise I will when I do the OD brake linings. I didn't have a stretcher tool but used plenty of soft jaw clamps to hold them in place. I bout a rivet tool from Meyers that you mount in the workbench vise (vice ?).

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  • 4 months later...

The bead was simply made by clamping the patch in the vise and hammering the rest over into an L-shape, then taken out of the vise and the short end of the L hammered over so it's really more of a fold than bead. No fancy metal working tools here (except the MIG welder if that counts). It is tricky to get it lined up with the crank hole, especially with the rad installed. It isn't perfectly centered but close enough when the hole plug is in. Thanks for the nice words. And thank you for the offer Country Traveler but I think I'll get this one good enough (it's almost finished). I suspect you will find others here may be interested in one.

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Originally many if not all of these beads were formed by placing a metal wire within the fold so for simplicity sake you would start the initial fold, possibly for ease tack a piece of say baling wire up in there and form the rest of the metal around the baling wire.

I have not attempted this myself, it does not sound easy but I do know I have found this wire within 29/30 DA fenders and have spent some time contemplating to myself how it was originally done and how I could replicate it if the need were ever there.

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Jason

A wired edge is fairly easy to do. I made my front apron up from scratch (in three pieces) and wired the bottom edges. The process is to determine where the edge will be and add about three and one quarter times the diameter of the wire ( Pi and a bit). The additional width of metal is then turned up at right angles using a folder or a couple of pieces of angle iron held in a vice. The ends of the angle iron can be secured by G clamps. A wooden tinman's mallet is best as it will not mark the metal like a steel hammer. This is OK for straight runs but where the edge u\is curved the turn up must be done by hand against something like a half moon stake held vertically or a heel dolly held flat on the bench.

Lay the wire inside the turned up edge and hold it there with your third and fourth hands! Otherwise hold it with a couple of pairs of vice grips at the ends. I used thick welding wire which is soft and complient. Start to turn the metal over the wire with a pair of pliers or similar, preferably without serrated jaws to minimise marking. Continue turning the metal with a square face planishing hammer and finish the turn around the wire with a cross pein hammer.

The alternative method for the better equipped is to use a bench mounted beading machine fitted with wiring rollers. These are standard equipment in many sheet metal shops.

Hope this explains the process.

Tony

Edited by TonyAus (see edit history)
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Jason

A wired edge is fairly easy to do. I made my front apron up from scratch (in three pieces) and wired the bottom edges. The process is to determine where the edge will be and add about three and one quarter times the diameter of the wire ( Pi and a bit). The additional width of metal is then turned up at right angles using a folder or a couple of pieces of angle iron held in a vice. The ends of the angle iron can be secured by G clamps. A wooden tinman's mallet is best as it will not mark the metal like a steel hammer. This is OK for straight runs but where the edge u\is curved the turn up must be done by hand against something like a half moon stake held vertically or a heel dolly held flat on the bench.

Lay the wire inside the turned up edge and hold it there with your third and fourth hands! Otherwise hold it with a couple of pairs of vice grips at the ends. I used thick welding wire which is soft and complient. Start to turn the metal over the wire with a pair of pliers or similar, preferably without serrated jaws to minimise marking. Continue turning the metal with a square face planishing hammer and finish the turn around the wire with a cross pein hammer.

The alternative method for the better equipped is to use a bench mounted beading machine fitted with wiring rollers. These are standard equipment in many sheet metal shops.

Hope this explains the process.

Tony

Yes it does, I will have to google ..........bench mounted beading machine fitted with wiring rollers.........as I am curious what this is. Thanks

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Hi Mike - I was just looking at the pics in the previous posts. Great work. I noticed that the radiator shell was either new or re-plated. If replated where did you have it done? Is it chrome or nickel. It looks great and I need to do mine. Thanks Jay.

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Hi Jay,

I had it re-plated with chrome at New England Chrome Plating in East Hartford, CT. They did a very nice job. I think they also do nickel plating and I know that would be correct for the 25 but I can't easily see the difference and chrome is supposed to hold its shine better/longer.

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That sounds right. The difference between chrome and nickel is more noticable when you have them next to each other. I think the repro dog bone rad cap and temp gauge are chrome plated so would look slightly different against a nickel rad shell. If you pay out a lot for a nicely chromed repro cap etc, it seems extravagant to have them redone in nickel.

Horses for courses I guess.

Ray.

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If I were going for concourse, AACA trophies and the like it would have been nickel plated but the amount of DIY rust repair on this ride precludes that sort of thing. Plus, I'm not a car wax junkie nor is the idea of buffing nickel one of life's great pleasures. I guess I'm just not a purist's purist in some respects...

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That sounds like a sensible plan, Mike. Like you I am not a pot hunter and don't know if you and Jason agree but I think the competition for concours trophies has got out of hand. Not wishing to besmirch anyone but I sometimes think those doing the judging are ill qualified to do it and besides that, I feel our hobby should be about enjoyment rather than 'nit picking'. If that sounds like a judgement in itself; to those who like basking in their own glory I would add "each to their own".

Ray.

.

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I prefer the appearance of nickel over chrome, I wonder what the difference in cost would be to have say that shroud done in nickel over the cost of chrome?

I myself would not worry about polishing it, if someone didnt like the way it looked I would tell them not too look at it.

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That is another valid approach Jason. I also thought about just painting it body color but I think the Brothers intent was to add a little pizazz. If chrome had been available a few years earlier I think they would have used it...

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I would imagine that chrome is dearer than nickel finish because it is just one extra step in the process. The item to be plated is first copper plated then bright nickel and chrome on top of that. I expect the cost depends upon who you go to. Everything depends, like paint, on the preparation. I use Derby Plating who have an excellent reputation and apart from the cheaper cars also do Jaguar, Daimler, Rolls Royce, Bentley etc.so the cost is high but the results can be relied upon in a market where quality is variable. One of the problems is that defintion can be lost through over enthusiastic buffing. The platers also need to be able to remove dings and dents properly.

There are several different chromium plate type processes; some being more heavily regulated than others because of their toxicity and subsequent polution threats. I will be having my rad shell done in nickel if that is what it should be. A good quality polish should keep it bright for a long time. A dehumidifier in the garage also helps.

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Also, it is my understanding that when you get a part re-nickel or chrome plated the prep involves copper plating first, then nickel and if you opt for chrome it happens after the copper and nickel. So it might be expected that nickel plating would be one less step and thus a little less expensive. I theory anyway...

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I'll be finding out. I have a shell that I want redone. It looks like the original nickel on it. I knew that N.E Crome Plating was there just didn't know of anyone that used them.

Mike - Did you remove anything before they did it? The mounting plate or hood hinge?

Jay

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I wish you good luck with the Buick. Are parts for that much easier to find?

YES! YES! YES!

Gas tank replacement ( 1 year and 1 model only - that should be easy to find.), complete exhaust, brakes, tires, fuel pump rebuild, water pump rebuild, tune up, radiator boiled out, generator checked out, belt changed, hoses replaced, carb rebuilt, replace mouse chewed wiring to the back of the car and she should be ready to go!

Straight Eight with three on the tree! ZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzooooooooooooooooommmmmmm down the highway!

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