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Jim_Edwards

A Maintenance Tip from the Past

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That is what I had to use when I was a kid cleaning the white walls on my Dads cars including the porta walls on his '55 Chevy.

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Yup, and nothing works better than Comet cleanser and a scrub brush on a white vinyl top................Bob

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I personally like Bon-Ami. In fact GM actually had / has a part number for it. Great to clean windshields of gunk. As advertised... never scratches.

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Yup, and nothing works better than Comet cleanser and a scrub brush on a white vinyl top................Bob

That's the worst stuff to use on a vinyl top. It'll dry it out in no time. I only say this because I once ruined a good top.

Edited by Skyking (see edit history)

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"You'll "oil-can" my hood !!!" "

That's actually the trunk lid ;^)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

I just had a look at what my owners manuals for my 64 and 65 beetle say. VW calls it a hood and the engine compartment a rear deck lid.

I still clean WW tires with a brillo pad.

Don

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That's the worst stuff to use on a vinyl top. It'll dry it out in no time. I only say this because I once ruined a good top.

I had just the opposite experiance with my 62 Pontiac. Sold it in the 70's with the original top still on it and it was white as snow and in good shape. Oh well....................Bob

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No it doesn't. I've been using it for 10 years with zero problems. It removes the top layer of rubber exposing a fresh layer below. You should try it before you damn it.

Edit: I don't mean to imply that it's the only way.

Edited by Barry Wolk (see edit history)

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Going to go ahead and agree with Bob. I also use a comet cleanser and scrub brush. Never had a problem with it, works wonders actually!

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Hey, what do you think an S.O.S. pad is anyway. Your both right, it's a Brillo Pad dipped in Comet.. More than one way to skin a cat.

I use Bleachly's spray and an S.O.S. pad on mine. Wished I had Bleachlys when i had to do dad's '38 Buick, back in the day....

Mike

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No it doesn't. I've been using it for 10 years with zero problems. It removes the top layer of rubber exposing a fresh layer below. You should try it before you damn it.

Edit: I don't mean to imply that it's the only way.

Barry, I think you have been lucky because not all products labeled as "Mineral Spirits" are chemically the same, and I accept that some may not yellow whitewalls. With both Mineral Spirits and synthetic rubber being from petroleum products there will be some degree of interaction between the two. If what you have been using is basically odorless the interaction may be slow and not detectable over weeks or even months.

It is not uncommon to use Mineral Spirits alone or mixed with other petroleum products to intentionally take advantage of interaction in order to soften tire tread to improve traction for certain types of vehicle racing and when tire use is brief.

You can certainly use what you find or believe acceptable, and I know many others have also done the same. Personally I wouldn't use anything on a tire sidewall that potentially alters the nature of the material or the adhesives used to vulcanize the white sidewall to the tire wall. Mineral Spirits of any nature are chemically incompatible with natural rubber, silicone, silicone rubber, and only marginally tolerated by Neoprene.

Been meaning to ask you if you are making the Keels & Wheels event this April.

Jim

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We'd love to, it's one of our favorite shows. Unfortunately, my wife is going through chemo and air travel is not recommended. She's doing great, but we can't take any unnecessary risks. It's a little too far to drive.

The mineral spirits I use comes from S-W in 5 gallon buckets. It's pure mineral sprits, not that half-strength paint thinner. Using thinner may cause yellowing because of whatever they use as filler to cut it.

I always use spirits and wipe it dry, as it will continue to cut the rubber if left wet. I've always disliked SOS as the iron particles embed themselves in little cracks and turn rusty.

Different strokes.................

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I hate to ask this but what does "Oil Can" the hood mean? I've had my mind in the gutter now for a few minutes but still can't come up with anything.

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If she pushes the hood in like an oil can, that's bad. But if it's truly like an oil can, it'll pop back out!

Phil

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I hate to ask this but what does "Oil Can" the hood mean? I've had my mind in the gutter now for a few minutes but still can't come up with anything.

Must be a young'un.

An old fashioned oil dispenser (can) for putting a drop of oil where you want it has a spout on top and a bottom made in a convex shape such that you could press on it to push oil out and then it would pop back into place to reset itself. I haven't had one for years as the newer ones all seem to have pumps built in instead.

So a piece of metal that is "oil canned" has been pushed in but can be popped back out without damage.

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Some oil cans had the "Ford" script and are collectable.When installed they are in a holder on the firewall The problem is you can't put a cap on them and they always leak all over the box of parts they're in and the box(boxes) underneath when youset up at a flea market.

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Hi,

I am using Bon ami.

It also helps to remove the scratching from the surface,

Also suggest it for you guys......

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I've always disliked SOS as the iron particles embed themselves in little cracks and turn rusty..

For rusty marks you need what is called in chemistry classes a Chelating agent, Barry. Either citric acid (eg lemon juice ) or better the sodium salt of EDTA work. The word is derived from the Greek word for crab, referring to the crab's two claws as metaphor for the way that the negative charges of the EDTA and citrate ions in solution grasp the matching positive charges of the ferric ions. Ferric oxide (rust) has a very low solubility product in water, but if the Fe+++ is continuously removed from the solution by chelating agent, the stain dissolves.

The other day I was quizzing by former boss at Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Reseach Organisation about best ways to clean inside radiator cores, he was adamant that Sodium EDTA was best, and would not dissolve the metal.

I'll get some to try on an nuseable 1918 Mercer core , which I just keep as a pattern.

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