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Den41Buick
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I am trying to locate my grandfather's first new automobile to see if it still exists. The car was a 1928 Marmon. His drivers license had the following information on it. Motor number T6255. Fact#E2H48 or E2HR48. I am not sure if it is possible to tell from the numbers if it was a open or closed car. Any information on identifying the car would be appreciated. Thanks!

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The engine number shows it as being a model 68, which would be a 114 inch wheelbase car straight 8 flathead engine. (smaller than the model 78 which was an overhead valve straight 8 engine and 120 inch wheelbase).

You may want to contact the Marmon Club on the net and see if that body number or engine number is in their files. Good luck!

:) kaycee

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  • 2 weeks later...

I believe that all the 68 bodies shared a frame and wheelbase size. This was true of the Model L from 1927 as well. Our sedan, coupe and convertible coupe share all mechanical and body parts excluding the body itself ( wheels, running boards, fenders, etc)

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As Sam mentioned, the body styles were on the same wheelbase (114 inch) on 1928 model 68's( the first year) . The 1927 Little 8 's ( the first Marmon eights)were a 116 inch wheelbase, and the '28 model 78 was 120 inch. The serial numbers that you gave indicated were for a '28 model '68 which had a flathead 8 cyl. engine (the first Marmon flathead eight cyl.) versus an overhead valve eight cyl. on Marmons first eight cylinder engine (the Little 8), and the '28 model 78 which was a slightly bored out version of the Little 8.

Body styles can't really be determined by the car serial number with the Fedco numbering system used in the late 20's from '27 through '29.

:) kaycee

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I have an interest in buying an unrestored 1929 Marmon series 68 three window coupe with rumble seat. Does anyone have a rough idea how many hardtop coupes were made by Marmon compared with other body styles. Its just a rough estimate that I'm after. Like, out of 100 cars made would there have been more than say 30% coupe bodies ?

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The Marmon Club knows of a total of five remaining 29 model 68 rumbles seat coupe. I don't know the production numbers but by survival rate i'd guess you're number is a little high. Our registry has 34 29/68s. 20 are sedans, 4 rumble seat roadsters, 1 each of Collapsible Coupe, Wasp replica, Touring, speedster/roadster and Victoria Coupe and 5 rumble seat coupes. Using this skewed sample it looks more like 1 in 7 or 15-18 percent would be the rumble seat coupe ( or as Marmon called it, Sport Coupe). Someone with the Marmon Heritage easily at hand could give better production numbers (Hello Kaycee??)

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From Marmon Heritage figures for 1927/1929 are a bit vague, I am of the opinion that because the Fedco System was adopted for 1927 production hard copies of records may not have been kept??. M/H states that 29,000 cars were produced in 29, page 235 states Roosevelt production at 25,089

Sedans 20,000

Coupes 2,500

Victorias 1,500

Convertibles 1,000

Marmons

Sedans 3,309

Coupes 652

Victorias 171

Convertibles 211

Following these figures on page 404 it states that 22,323 were registered in 29 with a total manufactured quanity of 29,219 but there is no reference that I can find giving a figure for individual models and styles.

Hope it gives a little helps to answer your question, I'm sure kaycee will be along with his usual helping hand.

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