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foxwood

1922 Studebaker Special Big Six

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My friend has inherited his dad's 1922 Studebaker Special Big Six. It has been in the family garage since the 50s.

It's in unrestored, original shape (needs either nothing, or a full restoration depending on what gets done with it). He'd like to sell the car to make room for other projects, but there are very few benchmarks out there price wise on this car. Anyone have any ideas as to what price range he's looking in? He doesn't want to rip anyone off, but he wants a realistic idea of what it's worth.

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Edited by foxwood (see edit history)

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Could you post many more pictures, please. Also, it is a Big Six. The shape of the nickeled rims around the headlights tells us this....thanks, B

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More pictures would help - as well as a list of what parts are under the car. It looks like the front apron is there - this would be a hard part to come up with if missing, also a cylinder head - what is the condition of the engine???

I sold a running roadworthy 24 Special 6 touring in 2000 for $6500 with many spare parts - since then I dont think the value of 20's cars has held much ground ESPECIALLY closed cars and while it looks like a great start, the interest might not be there...

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Thanks for your advice. Here are some more photos. The head is off in the photo of the motor, but it is under the car as well as both bumpers. There are spare bulbs and the discs for the rear turning lights.

Not sure what other parts he has collected over the years. There was literally a room full of parts for vintage cars. I have another post on here about the 1947 Cadillac Imperial Sedan that is beside the Stude.

Basically what you are saying is that the market is weak for closed cars. Any idea of value? It appears to be original paint and interior. Maybe even cord wheels.

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Just my opinion, but I'd expect somewhere between $3,000 and $4,000, with four thousand being optimistic. If the set of new tires go with it, I'd try for thirty eight hundred.

It's a cool car and should be saved. However there isn't a lot of demand for enclosed cars from the early 1920's. They're not as fun as open cars, and don't have the panache of the late 1920's and early 1930's. I hope he finds someone who will enjoy it.

As I said, just my opinion. Cars from the teens & twenties are my favorites.

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I agree with that. Sadly the "kids" in the hobby look at newer and newer cars and while Brass has seen a comeback there seems to be very little interest in the 20's unless we are talking the Classic cars - and even they seem a bit slow.

My opinion too, and I love cars from the 20's as well.

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I spend a lot of time working with post-war classics and some of the big pre-war showstoppers. I have not spent enough looking at the 20s and of these models. They look like a lot of fun. I'll pass this information along to the owner. Thank you very much.

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I came across this one again while searching some other Stude info.  Has anything further been done with it?  Looking at it again I think the radiator is from another model. The headlights are 1919-21 Model EG Big Six but I think the radiator could be from either a contemporary Special Six or a later model car.  One way to be sure whether it is a Special or Big Six is to measure the cylinder bore. The Special is 3 1/2" and the Big Six is 3 7/8"; easily determined with a simple ruler.  Wheelbase; Special Six 119", Big Six 126".

Edited by nzcarnerd (see edit history)

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Also the special six has a six clip demountable wheel and a smaller diameter hub cap and hub. Special six hub cap i.d. is 2 5/8". the Big Six uses a seven clip Wheel. the big six was also a seven passenger car with fold a way jump seats in the rear, At a glance. Owning a special six I would say it is a special six that is optioned well, and has had a headlight and tail light bezel from a big six added at some point.

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Hi

I just checked the latest "Old Car Price Guide" that I have

Here are their numbers for a 1922 Big Six

They judge cars with the 1 - 6 method.

 

1922 Model EK, Big Six, 6-cyl., 126” wb
 
4d Tr 680 2,040 3,400 7,650 11,900 17,000
2d Cpe 500 1,500 2,500 5,630 8,750 12,500
4d Sed 480 1,440 2,400 5,400 8,400 12,000
4d Spds 720 2,160 3,600 8,100 12,600 18,000
 
These are their numbers not mine
 
"The Commander"

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All very good except that it would appear that the car in question here is a Special Six.  Probably at least as rare a survivor as a Big Six sedan.

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Ok

1922 Model EL, Special Six, 6-cyl., 119” wb
2d Rds 660 1,980 3,300 7,430 11,550 16,500
4d Tr 640 1,920 3,200 7,200 11,200 16,000
4d Rds 680 2,040 3,400 7,650 11,900 17,000
2d Cpe 520 1,560 2,600 5,850 9,100 13,000
4d Sed 480 1,440 2,400 5,400 8,400 12,000

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