Jump to content

Reconstruction of a '34 Chevy Master Coupe


Recommended Posts

landman, what a pretty "mile-a-minute" speedster. Ours is a touring car but I do love a good speedster!! That Sieberling tire sign in pic 2 on the barn is gorgeous too, my little brother dated a descendant of Sieberling. Her mother always told her that her great grandpa had some little tire business named for the family. what a joy it was sharing the rich history of sieberling tires with her. We have a single tire Sieberling stand from the teens that I was able to show her and watch her jawdrop. Good Times!! Keep up the work. I have a 27 Marmon Model L that is twenty years in resto and getting closer by the week. It's great to read your story and wish for the free time and mad skills you show on this thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

landman, what a pretty "mile-a-minute" speedster. Ours is a touring car but I do love a good speedster!! That Sieberling tire sign in pic 2 on the barn is gorgeous too, my little brother dated a descendant of Sieberling. Her mother always told her that her great grandpa had some little tire business named for the family. what a joy it was sharing the rich history of sieberling tires with her. We have a single tire Sieberling stand from the teens that I was able to show her and watch her jawdrop. Good Times!! Keep up the work. I have a 27 Marmon Model L that is twenty years in resto and getting closer by the week. It's great to read your story and wish for the free time and mad skills you show on this thread.

Sambarn,

I understand Mile-a-minute roadsters are rather scarce. I remember the owners saying that someone in Chicago had taken parts off theirs and shipped to them for copying. They used a rubber pyramid mat as a model to cast the aluminum floorboards and running boards. They had to recast the floorboards a couple of times as they would shrink during cooling and the pedal holes wouldn't fit. A very talented tinsmith fabricated the gas tank. The wheels were respoked by a Mennonite wheelwright.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm still here Ray, don't worry. Was rather busy the last few days and didn't do any posting.

Put the body back on the frame to free up a bay for the missus' car and to try and adjust the doors. Stripped the fenders & the hood. Primed everything. That was November 2010. We are now pretty well caught up with the postings. The next postings will be more or less in real time. ;)

post-59904-143138471318_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138471328_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138471331_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138471333_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138471335_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138471337_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138471339_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138471341_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

looiks great!!! one helluva run!! i wish i had something left from my 34 master tudor to give you but a few pictures and a lot of good memories are all that is left. we will wait for updates and i sure am proud of what you did with what some people might call a pile of scrap. that would scare the average man to start with only what you had.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In this town, there is a club for retirees which is a fully equipped shop, metal, machine and wood. People go there and tinker. The ones that have skills build stuff on a voluntary basis. It turns out, one of the fellows who does some welding was an old type bodyman (one who fixes panels instead of replacing them). I took one hood panel, the tailpan and the trunklid to him and he shrank the stretched areas. The photos show the tell tale dime-size burn marks. You can almost see it happening. Fascinating.

The other thing I did is figure out where the seat tracks go under the seat frame and where the glider knobs go on the floor of the car. Thanks to patterns sent to me by a fellow hobbyist in Calgary.

post-59904-14313847259_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138472592_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138472595_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138472597_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sam,

Two things.

Firstly,when I took photos & made templates of my floorboards for someone the other day I noticed that there is no provision in my toe board for the accelerator rod. If you could provide me with a way to figure the shape & location of that, it would be great.

Secondly, a picture of the car in your avatar. What is it?

I'm sure something'll come up later. If the offer still stands, I'll holler.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Landman, that's our 1927 Marmon E75 Speedster, body by E.H.Wilson of Moline, Ill. built as the factory prototype with 1926 fenders. Google Marmon Wilson 1927, the concept carz website features some pics of the car. I'll shoot pics of the floorboards tomorrow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cleaned up the hood latch rods. Since the boss on the one from my car had a crack and the rod had been brazed, I removed the corresponding one from the parts car's hood.

Primed and installed with rivet head bolts. They get painted with the hood, body color. Handles will be removed and either rechromed or relaced by new ones.

post-59904-143138475349_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138475351_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138475353_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138475355_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138475357_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138475359_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138475361_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138475363_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Landman, I'm brand new to the site and I'm very impressed. I am beginning to restore the roof of a 29 Whippet and I need to replace some of the wood structure. I'm wondering where you referenced your woodworking and if there is a book or site I can refer to to help me along. I just want to tackle the roof for now because I enjoy driving it daily now that the season is near.

Rick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rick,

In my case it was easy since there are suppliers of Chevrolet wood. I purchased some of the piecesand copied others . In your case, I'd look for a Whippet club, other Whippet owners or literature about Whippet like a "Body Manual" which may show the wood skeleton by itself like the image below from the 1934 "Fisher Body Manual". Hope this helps.

Pat :)

post-59904-143138478984_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Landman, I'm brand new to the site and I'm very impressed. I am beginning to restore the roof of a 29 Whippet and I need to replace some of the wood structure. I'm wondering where you referenced your woodworking and if there is a book or site I can refer to to help me along. I just want to tackle the roof for now because I enjoy driving it daily now that the season is near.

Rick.

Rick,

Try www.wokr.org . It is the Willys Overland Knight Registry. They may have what you are looking for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Sam,

Would it be too much to ask for measurements to the center of the hole? Like for example 2in. from the top and 14in. from the left edges of the board. I don't know how I missed that.

Actually Sam,

If you look at posting #51, the hole is visible in the first photo. I could try and scale it off that.

Pat

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pat, It's a split rubber washer/bushing inside of the screwed on steel ring. Rod is about 3/8" with a ball on the end (see pic 1). The outside top edge of the ring is about 1/4" from the top of the floorboard and roughly 2 1/4" from the edge of the ring to the edge of the metal plate that the clutch and brake run through. The center lines up with screws on the bottom edge of the same metal plate. Entire ring - about 2 inches (it was really unpleasant holding up the mat and insulation to take the pics and hold the tape, sorry for the "about" measurements) in diameter. I'll send a couple more pics next. I bought the gas pedal from Chevy's of the forties, they may have a rod as well. Its position will help determine position for the "ring"/Hole.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Betsy ( our 34) was the first car I ever bonded with. Helping keep her sister's on the road is pay enough!! Feel free to call 205-482-0165 or write samdbarnett@bellsouth.net if you need anything at all, I'd be glad to help!. I just found out I need to replace the wiring harness last night on Betsy, frayed and shorting out the headlight fuse!! Fun! So I'll probably turn to the DF for advice. - Sam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing very exciting. Spoke to the engine rebuilder and several people, since NOS crankshafts and rods are available, we'll go that route.

Diasssembled both motors in preparation of the rebuild. Do not hold your breaths, I have to put the money together first.

Meanwhile I'll clean up all the parts that don't need rebuilding. :)

post-59904-143138488352_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138488355_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138488358_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138488361_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138488363_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I decided to start with the little stuff. Everything was in oily baggies so I set up a little cabinet complete with labeled drawers to receive all the small engine parts and fasteners.

Away I went in the parts cleaner and on the wire wheel. Too bad it's too noisy to have the music on. It's tedious but somebody has to do it. :)

post-59904-143138490785_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138490787_thumb.jpg

post-59904-14313849079_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138490792_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Landman, re the dashpot. Since it is run off of vacuum you can suck on it to see if it functions. And if you can hold your breath long enough, you can sense it leaking. But for a better way, I use a little Mighty Vacuum pump. You have to be careful that you do not give it too much vacuum or you might burst the rubber inside the dashpot. I just pull enough to get a reading and then let it sit and watch the needle. If it goes to zero then I would suspect that it is bad. If it holds the vacuum, then you are good to go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it turns out you need the starterator dashpot (vacuum assembly), I think I may have a NOS one. The parts are not handy, but I can look through them in the next few weeks. I also may have already sold it--my memory doesn't recall. Just let me know if interested.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice detailing - but I have to ask, what is a "Starterater"?

Tex,

The starterator is a device which combines the accelerator with the starter button. When it works, you depress the accelerator which catches the starter linkage and starts the car. Once vacuum is established, the vacuum unit withdraws the rod and the accelerator returns to its function. It mounts to the bell housing. I attach a drawing and a photo in the flesh.

post-59904-14313849855_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138498559_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cleaned more engine parts today and primed them. :cool:

Had a mishap with the water pump. :(

Tested the starterator dashpot with a vacuum pump & it doesn't hold. :confused:

And yes, 36 Chevy, I might be interested if you can find it. :)

post-59904-143138498561_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138498564_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138498566_thumb.jpg

post-59904-143138498568_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome work Landman ! Your a great inspiration in many ways.

I'm a younger man (47) that has recently fallen in love with just about every kind of restoration work in the last 5-7 years. Everything from working on the old American made tools (mainly large vises) to furniture and prewar vehicles. I particularly love the 28-32 body styles and have always had an interest in that era since I was a young boy but I have to say this is one very nice 34 project you have going here and I admire your tenacity and effort.

Keep up the good work young man and thank you for documenting the process. :)

Edited by 30DodgePanel
typos (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, 30Chrysler. I have to admit that a few times I wondering what I got myself into. That's nothing, I have to do the bodywork yet. The photos don't show the million nicks,hammer divots and weld valleys on there.

Terry, I have another pump and rest assured, it is not going in the vise held by one ear only.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...