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Reconstruction of a '34 Chevy Master Coupe


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How is the body itself mounted to the frame? I have heard or read in a few places, possibly even in the AACA, that a wood framed body can separate from the frame in a collision. So if you are anchored to the frame and the body separates in a collision, what are the risks?

It would almost be better without belts.

The 51 Cadillac I once owned, the PO had belts installed but but I found they were only attached to the floor sheet metal with large wood screws. They were worthless to say the least.

I assume that would only happen if the wood is rotten and the bolt heads pull through. In any case, I realigned my holes to catch the frame.

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I do not understand the must have seat belts in old cars thinking these days,we all grew up in cars without them and survived so why now. I hate wearing them and my old cars are my escape from all the modern government forced so called safety items,I am probably in the minority with this thought but I will never add them to any of my old cars but have no problems with those that do.

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That's better. You will be somewhat protected from the steering column and wheel destroying your chest in a frontal crash and the passenger will not crash into the screen. Can you add diagonals to prevent heads bending forward onto the wheel or dash?

It must be wonderful to be able to drive this nice car after the work you have put into it since the scrap-heap starting point.

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I do not understand the must have seat belts in old cars thinking these days,we all grew up in cars without them and survived so why now.

You were one of the lucky ones who grew up in one piece because you didn't have a significant crash.

Remember Ralph Nader's campaign in the '60s and '70s and how hard the car makers resisted? Try looking at the road toll now per person-mile and compare to that in the 1950s when there were no seat belts.

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I do not understand the must have seat belts in old cars thinking these days,we all grew up in cars without them and survived so why now. I hate wearing them and my old cars are my escape from all the modern government forced so called safety items,I am probably in the minority with this thought but I will never add them to any of my old cars but have no problems with those that do.

Jeff, in my case it is just to pacify my daughters so they'll allow me to take myt grandchildren for rides.

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I was in a wreck where if I were belted in with a shoulder belt I most likely would have been decapitated by the hood coming in through the windshield,I was knocked over towards the driver when the car hit the tree. I did not come out of it unhurt as it tore me up and spent almost a month in the hospital and I still do not like wearing them,I have no problem with people wanting to put them in but wondering why all of a sudden people are worried about not having any seat belts. Most people over 50 have been in vehicles with no seat belts and are still alive.

You were one of the lucky ones who grew up in one piece because you didn't have a significant crash.

Remember Ralph Nader's campaign in the '60s and '70s and how hard the car makers resisted? Try looking at the road toll now per person-mile and compare to that in the 1950s when there were no seat belts.

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Finally replaced the generator cutout with the solid state one I had purchased last year. The old one's cover had come loose again and shorted the armature. Enough this time to desolder a connection and render the unit junk.

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The modified one mounts the other way with different spacing so I had to make a mounting plate to be able to use the existing holes in the generator.

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Voilà. This is at fast idle with the choke pulled out.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Last fall, we did a photo shoot for my daughter's hairstyling salon. The photographer was the same one who had done the trick photo in post#40. Tat day she took another angle of the car and put my dad in it with the finished car.

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My invoice for that photo was to go to her church and allow the kids in her session to ask me questions about the car, its provenance and its restoration. I think the theme had to do with overcoming obstacles, perseverance and stuff like that. After the question period, they all had their picture taken with the car.

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Where is that "Give it ago attitude" Pat? Try some practice runs like Keiser suggested. I have seen stripers use glass to paint on. Can clean it off easy enough and re stripe over and over. Can hurt.:D

Followed Martin's advice and tried a short strip on a piece of glass to get the feel of the tape and to practice cutting a point. Works pretty well, this with a modeler's brush and cheap model paint. Next, I'll try it with the real stuff.

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Question. This is the only spot where the molding doesn't line up. Should I go straight through with the tape and hope the stripe visually offsets the misalignment or should I follow the molding in case the hood finds its place some day?

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Guest BillP

I don't always need a piece of glass striped, but when I do, I'm sending it to you.

As far as the molding mismatch, I'd try both. Very slightly allow the stripe to drop on the cowl as it approaches the hood and very slightly raise the hood stripe as it approaches the cowl. By very slightly, I mean ending up a 16th above or below where it would normally sit. The result will be an 8th closer and if the approaches are long and gradual, the changes will be imperceptible, and certainly less noticeable than if the stripes militantly followed the crowns. Long and gradual is the key. And if it looks like crap, you can wipe it off. As usual, my advice is free of charge.

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I hate to say this, but I would reshape/bend the hood to match the body reveal. Or I would just put the pinstripes where they belong on the reveal on each part and leave them misaligned. I think it might look a little funky if you tried to keep the stripes in line.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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Drove the Mustang 400 miles to attend. There was an area set aside for Mustangs to highlight the 50 years of Mustang. My son in law was a co-driver. Needless to say, he had the seat all the way back.

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There was eye candy for 7th son, Avantey & R1Lark.

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One for Mr.TexRiv,

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And one for dei. It might even be his car.

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Looks like you had a great Fathers Day Pat. Congratulations on a safe and problem-free run. Great photos too. I love the very first photo - 1941 Chrysler Coupe. The 1964 Olds Starfire is a fine one too! Thanks for the photos - time to rest up! :)

Chuck

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Thanks Keiser. I thought about that but I'd be afraid to crack the finish.

Maybe warming up the hood a little before gently bending it would prevent the paint from cracking?

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What should have been a straightforward job today ended up being a nightmare. Well at least a PITA.What are the odds that the pinstriping stencils be the same color as the car? Enough to make you cross-eyed trying to figure out whether they are straight.

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Now that the stripes are on, I suppose we can declare the project done. There are a few things I'd like to add eventually like trim rings ,the fancy bird rad cap but they aren't really restoration. So here we are, 13 years later with a good looking, not quite sorted out old Chevy. Naturally, I would like to preserve this thread somehow. I looked at printing, that is feasible without the photos although it would be quite a ream of paper. With the pictures it is something like 20 pages of paper for each thread page. Is it possible/allowed to download the thread on a memory stick? If so how big is it and I imagine it would only work if the forum is still online, is that correct? Anyway I'm open to suggestions.

I would like to thank and salute all the followers of the thread for their comments, support and help. To conclude, I'm posting a photo of my granddaughter (who appears in the thread a few times) in the car, on what would have been the 100th birthday of my father . 1914-2014.

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Pat;

Looking back at what you started out with, that sure was a challenging restoration, but the car really looks beautiful now. It certainly is a testament to your skills, and tenacity.

I know how difficult it was at times to keep going on my '41 Roadmaster, which though I'm driving it, I still have a few things to finish on it.

Sometimes I think that the very hardest part of a project like this is to simply keep it going towards completion.

Tip of my hat to you!

Keith

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Pat,

I would like to say job well done. You truely put your heart and soul in this restoration. Your are an inspiration to the hobby. I enjoyed reading your posts on the project. Enjoy driving and sharing it with others. Now it's time for Birthday cake and a little celebration! :)

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Pat,

I'm in agreement, your thread and posts have been one of the good reads here. You started with a tuff project to begin with and had a good mix of details and experiences along the way not to mention some stories thrown in now and then that kept us coming back. Although your posting had been slowing down over the past few months as the project was basically done, it will be different knowing it's now for the most part offically done.

What a project and a great job in the end, something to be totally proud of. Who knows, maybe after a bit of time you'll find a need to find yourself another project. If you do we'll be here to follow along, offer encouragement along with any advise or insight we may have to offer. Scott...

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I really enjoyed this thread. I looked back to the first posts and I am really amazed how nice the car looks now. That was quite a bit of work and the talent to bring it back from a rusty hulk is really amazing.

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Pat, great job on this car. I know it has been a labor of love, and has a special place in your heart because of your Dad.

This has been one of my favorite threads since I started spending time here. Thanks for doing such a great job of including us in your restoration thru words and pictures.

What's your next restoration? :)

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Pat, great job on this car. I know it has been a labor of love, and has a special place in your heart because of your Dad.

This has been one of my favorite threads since I started spending time here. Thanks for doing such a great job of including us in your restoration thru words and pictures.

What's your next restoration? :)

I'm currently turning my shop back to woodworking and will start making models of my two cars. That will be a bit challenging too as there isn't one made of either of 'em.

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