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I have a wisconsin 6 cly. T-head motor, the tag says type-L 5.10 x 51/2 motor no.4, lots of brass and copper.heads are iron block is alum. carb is a large brass strongburg,missing the mag. but every thing else is there,turns over with the crank, and the compression released by hand but is harder with the realeases closed, is there any interest in this type of motor? contact me if there is.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have got the T-head out and am getting the dust wiped off,carb is still in the storage box will be getting it on the next couple of days. Have gotten some pictures and will be getting more as the weather is going to be good now for a while. Thanks for all the replays Jim Huffman

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I have a wisconsin 6 cly. T-head motor, the tag says type-L 5.10 x 51/2 motor no.4, lots of brass and copper.heads are iron block is alum. carb is a large brass strongburg,missing the mag. but every thing else is there,turns over with the crank, and the compression released by hand but is harder with the realeases closed, is there any interest in this type of motor? contact me if there is.

Hello, please send photos to keith123451@live.com

thanks,

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Hi, it looks like a brute! I suspect it might be Fire truck. Even the large commercial trucks of this time seemed to favor 4 cyl. engines. Anyone know of a standard truck that used a BIG six like this? The engine in my 3 ton Packard dosen't hold a candle to this one. Mind you I would to have an example of it's 4 cyl. little brother for a different{than the Packard} project. Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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If any are unfamiliar with these, Wisconsin built water cooled engines from quite early years until 1939 (if memory serves) when they concentrated on air-cooleds.

I've been told the early Wisconsins were T-heads, and the "L" does show in a 1917 ring catalog, with a 1914 date (don't know what the date means); that catalog is set up by ring sizes, each ring size listing engines, cars, trucks, tractors using that size (Wisc 6cyl J and JU also used that ring size).Will eyeball some of my stuff later to see if can find some things it was used in.

Many Wisc's were also used as stand-alone power units, and they generally had a good reputation from what I've read.

A 1948 Thompson "manual" lists Wisconsin 6cyl L-1, L-2, L-3, L-4 engines, apparently completely different engines (probably OHV), ranging from 37/8 to 41/4 bores, all 5" stroke. Engines listed there range from 4cyl 251cid to 6cyl 1340 cid (no typo). Bud

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You might just have a rara avis indeed...while the "L" shows up in that 1917 catalog, out of a half dozen circa 1929-33 catalogs only one, a 1930 McCord, lists it, but only showed a head gasket, didn't even list b/s (unusual for that catalog).

My earlier post was in error in that the J, JU etc series were all 4's, NOT 6's; in that 1917 catalog the only possible user in that segment was a JJ Schneer/Schnerr model G tractor circa 1917+??...BUT remember these old parts catalogs concentrated on more popular parts; most of the low-prod stuff had to be on special order.

A quick eyeballing of a fair 1924 piston catalog and the 1930 McCord catalog found no--repeat--no listings for "L" uses; it isn't listed in 32,33, 36 or later good coverage catalogs

Re' the fire truck comment, Schneer/Schnerr did build fire trucks, but I have no listings (not surprising for low-prod models); heavy fire truck engines were often dual ign.

If no takers pan out here, please post it on the heavy eqpmt and Ag sites, as it may've been a power unit engine (gens, irrig, shovels/cranes etc) and it'd be a shame to let it go to scrap . Good luck. Bud

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  • 2 months later...
Jim ,The pleasure is all mine..... I am thankfull you waited for me to get west and pick this beautifull engine up. It is getting a good home . Thanks again Mike

Mike, I'm sure others are as curious as me. What does it fit or what project are you using it for? I suspect it is 1911-12-maybe 15 truck or tractor?

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The engine will be restored and put in my collection until i find the right "fit" for it. Its a wonderful, original piece and Im lucky that my friend Jim Huffman retrieved it from a mile underground in a abandoned gold mine 25 years ago. Ill be reporting the whole story soon ................ mike

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Hi group, I spotted a photo on THE OLD MOTOR photo posting site {first class site, highly recommended} which shows a very similar engine being used to power the snow blower section of a circa 1920's large self propelled snow blower. These engines are big, I have seen one near to me in British Columbia Canada. With the possible exception of Fire Trucks I doubt they were intended for road vehicles. An industrial use {such as a mine pump unit} seems like a far more likely original use. They are sure an impressive power unit, I would love to have one for my collection. I make my living as a Marine Engineer so I am used to operating and maintaining marine diesel power plants of 6000 + H.P. Even though units like this T head are small in comparison to the ones I see on the job, they are a great reminder of our industrial past.

I hope it is returned to running condition.

Best regards to the new owner Greg in Canada

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The AACA Museum in Hershey has a SuperTruck in its collection with a Wisconsin engine. The engine is an "X" as opposed to the "L" seen above. I don't know if this is of any help or interest, so, for what it's worth. Sorry. I don't know why I don't have a full engine photo. From what I can see, though, it doesn't look the same.

post-33613-143138535662_thumb.jpg

post-33613-143138535668_thumb.jpg

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