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Danger be aware of this


B1rdman
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old gasoline will lock up valves, then pushrods bend, and break.

i started my 1937 chevrolet, on old gas and ran it about a hour

and shut it off. next morning i tryed to start it.

mangled all six intake pushrods. got to figure out what to

do with long term parking with gas in the tank

i got the valves broke loose, but now in need of a set

of pushrods.

gene

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old gasoline will lock up valves, then pushrods bend, and break.

i started my 1937 chevrolet, on old gas and ran it about a hour

and shut it off. next morning i tryed to start it.

mangled all six intake pushrods. got to figure out what to

do with long term parking with gas in the tank

i got the valves broke loose, but now in need of a set

of pushrods.

gene

Don't know why you would have posted this in a Lincoln forum, but since you did, the problem is not the gasoline. I'm guessing you have a carburetor that is leaking fuel into the intake after the engine is shut off. Time to get that sucker rebuilt!

Jim

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Just went through this very thing on a "running when parked" 1950 Chevrolet a friend bought and tried to get going without doing due diligence. Previous owner ran on gas just starting to varnish-up several years ago (goo by the time the new owner got it). Seller tried to get it going and failed. New owner tried and failed. We pulled the valve cover and all intake (only intake) push rods were bent and one rocker snapped. Long push rods are the weak link.

It takes longer than one season for this to happen, but since the new gas goes bad so quickly I tell people to run them low before setting them up for the winter. When spring arrives, dump in a fresh can of gas, pour in a bottle of isopropyl alcohol to take care of any moisture that may have accumulated, and make your first trip one to the gas station to top it off and you're good to go for the summer.

Since it doesn't sound like you're taking apart your head to clean it, dribble ATF on the stems and work the valves by hand to help wash out the guide and when you restart add some ATF to the gas to help "wash" your intake stems on the next tank. That will get the old varnish out so it doesn't glue itself together again.

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Just went through this very thing on a "running when parked" 1950 Chevrolet a friend bought and tried to get going without doing due diligence. Previous owner ran on gas just starting to varnish-up several years ago (goo by the time the new owner got it). Seller tried to get it going and failed. New owner tried and failed. We pulled the valve cover and all intake (only intake) push rods were bent and one rocker snapped. Long push rods are the weak link.

It takes longer than one season for this to happen, but since the new gas goes bad so quickly I tell people to run them low before setting them up for the winter. When spring arrives, dump in a fresh can of gas, pour in a bottle of isopropyl alcohol to take care of any moisture that may have accumulated, and make your first trip one to the gas station to top it off and you're good to go for the summer.

Since it doesn't sound like you're taking apart your head to clean it, dribble ATF on the stems and work the valves by hand to help wash out the guide and when you restart add some ATF to the gas to help "wash" your intake stems on the next tank. That will get the old varnish out so it doesn't glue itself together again.

I don't think you meant isopropyl alcohol since it will not burn. I think you meant wood alcohol or methyl alcohol which mixes with water and will burn.

Jim

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matter of fact is i posted on this board, because i have a 1947 lincoln contintal.

and i thought it possible might help some one from going through what i did.

lawn mower, car or what ever gasoline that has set for years will seize the intake valves.

gene

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Jim; I think if you check out "Isopropyl Alcohol" you will find that it will burn and it is highly flammable.. In Fact the "Better" gas line antifreeze containes "Isopropyl alcohol". The "Cheaper" gas line antifreeze containes Menthanol . Isopropyl is Also Known as "Rubbing Alcohol" and can be purchased at any Drug Store . It is sold in 70% and 90% strength ..

Edited by notnow (see edit history)
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Jim; I think if you check out "Isopropyl Alcohol" you will find that it will burn and it is highly flammable.. In Fact the "Better" gas line antifreeze containes "Isopropyl alcohol". The "Cheaper" gas line antifreeze containes Menthanol . Isopropyl is Also Known as "Rubbing Alcohol" and can be purchased at any Drug Store . It is sold in 70% and 90% strength ..

I should have qualified my statement regarding isopropyl and buring. Isopropyl will certainly burn even with a 70% solution, aka rubbing alcohol. However its flammability is greatly reduced by the amount of water it may absorb. An under 50% solution will become virtually impossible to ignite and while it may hasten the evaporation of moisture in open air it doesn't burn worth a flip. So, if you start out with a 70% solution you can figure less than a cup of condensed moisture (water) in a gas tank or fuel system could be absorbed and it still burn if putting no more than a pint of Isopropyl alcohol in the tank. In other words highly flammable only if pure! On the other hand, not all "rubbing alcohol" is isopropyl, it can be ethyl alcohol, otherwise known as ethanol.

Methanol, i.e.; wood alcohol is considered a fuel and is commonly mixed with water for improving performance in diesel engines. It's evaporative pressure makes it a good fuel for camp stoves, etc.; whereas isopropyl's evaporative pressures are far too low to make it a decent fuel. All three types of alcohol can be found in many if not most drug stores and all three may well be labeled as "rubbing alcohol", though most commonly methanol may be also labeled as "wood alcohol."

As for gas line anti-freeze or fuel tank anti-freeze it is totally pointless for any automobile with a pressurized fuel injection system and becomes particularly pointless with E-10 and E-15 fuels which contain more than a sufficient amount of ethanol to absorb any moisture within the fuel system, whether pressurized or not. Pressurized systems are not open to the air and therefor have no moisture source other than the few minutes when the fuel tank is filled and even then the temperature has to be conducive for the formation of condensation.

Of all three types of alcohol, isopropyl would be the least effective in terms of ridding a fuel system of moisture or preventing ice crystal formation in fuel lines given a 70% solution is already partially saturated with water. At less than 68% it cannot even be labeled as being rubbing alcohol.

Jim

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WALTER;That Organization is somewhat of a Privately Funded Gruope. As a result they have a hard time expanding and rely on private funding.. Not much to see this time of the Year due to the weather.. They have a location on Hubbard Road ,When the Weather Breaks come take a Look-see.. While you in the Area, be sure to Visit the Museum of Steel. They have a Display of A Blast Furnace With Steel Workers at Work..One of the Men (Bronze Statue) was a Customer of Mine In the 60's.. They Used Actual Steel Workers as models For the Bronze Statues..It's an interesting Place to Visit if Your interested in Such things.It's located In The Downtown Area..

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WALTER;That Organization is somewhat of a Privately Funded Gruope. As a result they have a hard time expanding and rely on private funding.. Not much to see this time of the Year due to the weather.. They have a location on Hubbard Road ,When the Weather Breaks come take a Look-see.. While you in the Area, be sure to Visit the Museum of Steel. They have a Display of A Blast Furnace With Steel Workers at Work..One of the Men (Bronze Statue) was a Customer of Mine In the 60's.. They Used Actual Steel Workers as models For the Bronze Statues..It's an interesting Place to Visit if Your interested in Such things.It's located In The Downtown Area..

Thanks for the tips! Nothing like finding out from a local where all the best stuff is hidden.

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