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What is a 1968 MGB worth in bad shape?


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I found this MGB sitting in the driveway of a vacant house, part of an estate that is being settled. I think it is a 1968 model--that's what it says on the inspection sticker. It has been sitting since 1986 in a garage, and then the garage deteriorated and now it is sitting outside with no top. I was surprised to find that it still has floors and they appear to be fairly solid. I was able to turn the engine. The car is weathered and needs a complete restoration. 45,000 miles showing on odometer.Wire wheels are badly rusted, tires are flat, tail light lenses and other small parts missing, engine appears to be complete, convertible top is no good, glass is good, seat upholstery is savable, I'm thinking this is for parts but the body does seem to be pretty decent. I am no MG expert, so looking for advice as to what this is worth; the family will want an offer. Opinions? Guidance?

This has a 6-volt battery in it. Is that correct for a 1968 model????

Pete Phillips

Sherman, Texas

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It is definitely a 1968 model, based on the (new for 1968) door panels and the lack of headrests (introduced in 1969). Everything else that I can see is consistent with an unmolested 1968 car.

All MGBs through (I think) 1974 used 2 six volt batteries under a common cover under the floor behind the seats.

If the car is only useful as a parts car it should be worth about $500-$700 (if it is complete). If it is at all restorable, then your into the $2000 range, and if it runs you're looking at a $3000 car. You can add at least $500 to each of those figures for a car with overdrive.

MGBs are one of the most restoration-friendly cars you buy. It is the '57 Chevy of England (to the TR6's Mustang). As such parts availability is extensive, both NOS and (vast quantities of) reproduction parts. The main parts suppliers are Moss Motors, The Roadster Factory, and British Victoria. Check their online catalogs to see what's available.

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Doesn't look that bad from the pictures you posted. I had a '74 as a daily driver and it was not nearly as desirable or as much fun as the '68 you are considering. The later cars had horrible problems with emission controls and literally can't get out of their own way. The newer ones also suffered from cost cutting measures such as no drain petcock in the block.

The biggest problem is the rust, which doesn't look too bad from the pictures. As mentioned above, the mechanical components are readily available and are not that expensive. Unless you are a whiz at body and interior work you can spend a small fortune on these areas.

Based on numbers given above, you might try to get an idea of body work costs and go from there. Good luck!

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The biggest problem is the rust, which doesn't look too bad from the pictures. As mentioned above, the mechanical components are readily available and are not that expensive. Unless you are a whiz at body and interior work you can spend a small fortune on these areas.

Based on numbers given above, you might try to get an idea of body work costs and go from there. Good luck!

Literally every body panel is available for these cars, although many need to be welded in since this is a unibody car. You can even buy complete body shells for the 1968 and up cars for about $13K. ( TRF MGB and MGB-GT Parts - Body Sheet Metal--complete Body Shells (The Roadster Factory MGB Glovebox Companion page 119))

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