Jump to content

Correct 1927 EU Engine Finishes


TomB
 Share

Recommended Posts

As I embark on my restoration journey for my 1927 Dictator EU Standard Six, I realize I'm lacking info on correct finishes for the engine and engine compartment. Does anyone know a good information source for correct colors/paint/plating for the various engine components? Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Terry:

Thanks so much for the engine colors. When you say "black," would that be satin, semi-gloss or flat? Seems to me I don't recall seeing many gloss finishes under the hoods of antique cars. What color was the oil dip stick? Were fasteners black or engine color (light grey)? What about head bolts? Were any parts plated (like cadmium, etc.)?

Thanks again for the info you provided. This forum and the info provided on it is invaluable!

TomB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom

I can't locate the info at the moment, but if I remember correctly, it seems to me that all auto manufacturers used gloss black under the hood and on the chassis until about 1950. Later than I thought. The valve cover and water jacket cover on mine have never been refinished and the remaining paint is gloss.

As far as I know, all under hood fasteners, including head bolts were natural finish. So was the dipstick. No cad plated parts under the hood. T

Incidentally, have you found out why the dipstick is as heavy as it is?

Terry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree with Terry's color recommendations. Restoring my 1923 Light Six and opted to black oxide all my fasteners. Trying to get rusty fasteners back to their "natural state" isn't very easy. After sand blasting they take on an unnatural look. You could clearcoat afterwards but they just don't look the same. I used the black oxide kit that Eastwood sells. They really come out nice and it provides a decent corrosion protection. Also gives a look of natural heat treated fasteners.

Scott

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom

Tool storage is under under the front seat. You might be surprised if you haven't looked. :)

I missed the water pump housing and oil filler cover in the list of black items.

There is a 1925 Stude on Ebay with a good picture of the right side of the engine. Also a 1927 with a left side picture, but a lot of it is in a shadow.

Terry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Terry:

Assuming the heavy dip stick was not intended as a weapon, I'm guessing its heft was to keep it from bouncing out of the crank case; however, I'm sensing a rhetorical question (ha ha).

I will most certainly check under the front seat for a tool kit!

I checked eBay 10 hours after your post, and the 1925 Stude was gone. I did manage to find the '27 Stude on eBay. Any word on the correct finish for intake and exhaust manifolds?

I would like to thank you and Scott for all your input on correct engine finishes. You guys with all the Studebaker knowledge are sooooo helpful. The depth of your knowledge is awesome! I'm sure I'll have plenty more questions as I stumble through my restoration journey.

Thanks again,

TomB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom

The dipstick could do some physical damage if it was used as a weapon, couldn't it? :) The real reason is the end of the D shaped dipstick fits into a corresponding hole in the oil drain plug. To drain the oil a screwdriver or similar tool is put through the dipstick handle and used to turn the dipstick a couple turns to the left to open the oil drain. The original drain plug is pot metal, so I wouldn't do that until the plug is replaced though.

Terry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Terry:

Awesome! That's good to know considering an owners' manual did not come with my car.

I'm guessing the exhaust manifold was left unfinished (i.e. bare metal); at least that's how I remember seeing most pre-war cars. Was the intake manifold light grey or black?

TomB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...