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1948 Lincoln sold @Barrett Jackson Auction


vetsalsman

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FYI, a 48 Lincoln convertible lot 64.1 sold @ Barrett Jackson yesterday for $44,000.00 plus auction fees

It was labeled as a continental by the auction but it was not a continental. Sea Foam Green, older restoration. You can go to their web site and see pictures & description.

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I checked NADA classic price guide and they both have a high price of 64,400 but the Lincoln convertible low price was 17,400 the Continental is 37,700. What bothered me was that Barrett/Jackson listed and sold it as a Continental. I thought that they were thorough in their research and info on the cars they auction. Hopefully the guy that spend $40 grand for the car knows what he bought.

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Seems the Continental usually carries about a 20% higher market value than the non Continental post war Lincoln. I can tell you that Barrett Jackson relies heavily on what the owner of the car tells them when they consign the car verses having actual confirmed information. As in any buying situation the buyer needs to have done their own homework on a car that they want to bid on. Also the television announcers throw out a lot of misinformation. No one can know everything about all vehicle marques but it bothers me when these announcers state things as fact that are incorrect. As far as barrett jackson not even labeling a car correctly in its auction description my feeling is their auctions are great car shows but not the best place to buy a car. The buyer who thinks it has to be a great car solely because it is being sold at a Barrett Jackson auction is misinformed.

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  • 7 months later...

Edsel Ford took the Style Leader Lincoln-Zephyr and created one of the most iconic automobile designs ever. Long after he was gone, and the silly horse collar warmed over

Ford wore his name, folks were dressing up their non Lincoln cars with the ultimate glamour accessory "The Continental Kit". The design was honored by the fine art / design crowd as well. The Zephyr paid the bills, but the Continental was the star... It continues.. I started

Zephyring in '73...at the time there were 0 Zephyr's restored like mine...even before Mr Cole, who all club members know well, there were more pictures of Continentals in the Zephyr Club publication than it's namesake...so be it....

I dare say then and still today, folks use Zephyr for parts to restore Continentals.. I noticed that mostly older fellas had those connies and in my youth figured I would intentionally be different...I campare it to a car show today, Mustangs, Chevelles by the dozens...

The turning point was the rape and dismemberment of a 39 Zephyr 3 window coupe know as scrape....all of a sudden a new generation seemed to notice LZ's..for better or worse.

The general public, and "car guys" in general do not discern the difference, kinda funny...I suppose they dont know what a Ford Vicky is either...

40 grand is cheap...There is a 40 Cont on ebay now for starting bid 99 grand...I'd like to see the fine print.. 125 invested will sacrifice...etc.. How do do price art?? These cars have (for the most part) left the transportation / cruising crowd, for the uncover and look at it crowd...and for that, Edsel's masterpiece cannot be beat...But I will tell you from first hand experience, that when functioning properly, a lincoln Zephyr is a wonderful automobile whether puttering down the lane, or flyin down the interstate..

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I agree, Bwatoe. BTW, I wouldn't put much stock in the NADA price guide for classic cars: they have the retail price for a '37 Zephyr coupe ranging from a low of $15,840 to a high of $32,890 for an excellent car. Ooooooookayyyyy ;)

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  • 2 weeks later...

There were 1241 Zephyr convertibles built from Sept 1945 to Mar 1948. During that same period there were 1341 Continental convertibles built. The Continental was the Gee Wizz car that every one had to have and when they owned it they kept it running and on the road by installing a V 8 engine if they had to. This probably saved many a Continental from the crusher. The lowly Zephyr however did not have the apeal of the Continental and by the time it was 5 or 6 years old it languished on the back row of many a used car lot and was either sold as a beater or junked to clear the space. Today about 70% of the Continentals built still exist in some form or other , but only about 100 of the Zephyrs are left.

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