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keiser31

Reeves Octoauto suspension...

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Hey guys...anyone out there have any information about the suspension on the Reeves Octoauto? A buddy is trying to make a model of the vehicle and needs help with the details. Please let me know what you can come up with. John

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

It is all Overland except for the specialty parts to convert it. We thought the car was found a couple of years ago but after going through all the parts we could see (stacked up) it could not be proven to be the real McCoy.

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Steve...thanks for that. I see the car's history in a couple of my books and that it was a 1910 Overland, but nothing there shows the underside and the extra axle setups. I guess the guy making the model will have to go to the patent drawings or copies of them if they exist.

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Steve...thanks for that. I see the car's history in a couple of my books and that it was a 1910 Overland, but nothing there shows the underside and the extra axle setups. I guess the guy making the model will have to go to the patent drawings or copies of them if they exist.

Here's a photo of that thing! What the hell was he thinking?

octoauto.jpg

Jim

Edited by West Peterson (see edit history)

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Here's a photo of that thing! What the hell was he thinking?

octoauto.jpg

Jim

From what I gather by my reading up on the vehicle, it was an attempt at long distance driving via extra tires. Not having to change tires was a real incentive. I have tried to change a tire on a 1914 Cartercar and the tire was pliable. Two of us could not do it, so we found a guy in town that has ALL of the ancient tire changing equipment we needed. I cannot imagine having to change a tire like that on the side of a muddy road!

Edited by West Peterson (see edit history)

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The same builder also produced a more useable six wheel version.

Mercedes did not forget this idea as they also built the infamous armored G-4 Staff Car with two complete & coupled rear-end drives and bullet resistant tires on six wheels !

Professor Fate would have loved the octoauto during the 60s film

The Great Race !

Edited by Silverghost (see edit history)

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The suspension is very similar to the tandem axles on a semi-trailer. I inspected the "pile" that Steve mentioned and would love to make a car out of that some day. Any one with a very large checkbook interested? Locoman.

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The idea was to double tire life and give a ride "beyond the dreams of the neurotic" to quote and early ad. The ad also described how the car glided over a busted up Nicholson pavement, described as the end of the limit in rough roads.

A quick search turned up this account.

In 1911, Milton formed the Reeves Sexto-Octo Co. of Columbus, Ind., and turned to manufacturing some of the oddest, yet sleek-looking cars ever made: the Sextoauto and the Octoauto, multi-wheeled cars with six and eight wheels. These were titled "The easiest riding cars in the world," and followed the premise that the more tires on the ground, the more comfortable the ride. Reeves wanted an auto that would "float" over bumps and rough streets. Thus came the eight-wheeled Octoauto, which was praised in two pages of prose by a well-known writer of the time, Elbert Hubbard.

"In the Reeves Octoauto," Hubbard wrote, "the load is distributed over eight wheels, instead of being concentrated on four. In a four-wheeled automobile, a wheel at each corner carries one-fourth of the load. In case of an imperfection in the road or the sudden dropping down into a rut, one wheel may for an instant carry half the load, and it is this sudden jolt and burden that causes tire trouble."

The Octoauto was simply a modified 1910-1911 Overland automobile. The length of the Octoauto - 248 inches - was a huge drawback, in addition to its price of $3,200. None were ever sold.

In the summer of 1912, Milton bought a brand new Stutz, and converted it into the six-wheeled Sextoauto. Its price was $5,000, and none were ever sold. This ended Milton's ventures in the automobile world.

Read more: http://gasengine.farmcollector.com/gas-engines/A-TALE-OF-TWO-BROTHERS.aspx?page=3#ixzz1B4uGP47S

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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"What was Reeves thinking?"

I expect he was thinking of selling a lot of shares of Octoauto stock!

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As a footnote to this story, Reeves initial foray into automobile production was to promote a VST transmission of his design.

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As a footnote to this story, Reeves initial foray into automobile production was to promote a VST transmission of his design.

VST... Variable Speed Transmission? Yes, No? Dandy Dave!

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While we're on cars with extra axles... This wonderful car is at the same museum in Denver where I have my HPOF Amphicar on display. They are SUPER nice folks! They asked me to display it for 90 days... 4 years ago! I took the text and photos from their site. It's far rougher than the pics make it look, but she's a beauty in person. It's HUGE!

"This automobile was recorded as being built in Barcelona and the body is believed to have been designed and built by Henry Binder of France. It was built on order by a king who was deposed before he could take delivery. (Most likely it was George II who was king of Greece from 1922-1923.)

The car was bought by the Hollywood director D.W. Griffith for $35,000. It appeared in the 1933 film "My Lips Betray" and a few war movies. We are currently researching this automobile's movie career. If you have any information, please contact the Forney Transportation museum" in Denver (303-297-1113)

1923 Hispano Suiza Victoria Town Car

6 Cylinder, 6 Wheel

Model H6A Barcelona, Spain

post-31565-143138409623_thumb.jpg

post-31565-143138409626_thumb.jpg

post-31565-143138409628_thumb.jpg

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John:

Are both rear axels of this massive Hispano~Suiza actually power driven ?

Humm? I dunno. Next time I'm down there, I'll look under her skirt and see. :) I can't believe I didn't think about that in all the times I've been there.

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Is that a corvette in the middle of that? I can't believe these cars with 2 front axles would turn or corner very well?

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His variable ratio V-belt drive made money, even though his automotive suspension brainwaves could have been reasonably ascribed to someone that past Duesenberg specialist Jerry Gebby identified as "Rube Goldberg", or alternatively to cartoonist Heath Robinson of the old English "Punch" magazine. I guess one point to note is that the Overland and Stutz shared one feature. Both had less than ideal ratio of sprung to unsprung mass because of the transaxle unit which included the gearbox. ( a fair proportion of the torque tube mass added to unsprung mass also.) By what twist of reasoning could anyone conclude that extra unsprung lazy axles could improve that critical determinant? It probably illustrates well that few designers then understood ride and handling very well.

The Overland and Stutz were reported to have been converted back to original form.

The variable ratio V-belt drive had one side of one pulley that was axially spring-loaded. The example I have here has a very heavy and wide belt. As you change the distance between driving and driven shafts the belt grips at different radius in that pulley, which changes the drive ratio. The device had limited range of drive ratio. but it certainly had usefulness for light duty machinery.

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Reeves also invented something a little more useful, the automobile muffler.

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Reeves also invented something a little more useful, the automobile muffler.

Can you give us a make and a date? It must have been very early.

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