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KenHupp20

1911 Simplex in Miniature

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The amazing work in the Continental model project prompted me to post a few photos of Edgar Roy's Simplex in Miniature done back in the 50's- 60's.

He had restored a full size car , then decided to build a model of it.

I think he ended up making 5. They are 1/6 scale ( approx. 2' overall ) .

They are working models by the way .

My uncle Robert D. Wild built some ( maybe all ) of the bodies.

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I saw Ed Roy demonstrate one of them, running, at a Lars Anderson meet years ago. They did run although he could not control the speed well, it was much too fast, and they wouldn't run for long. If I remember correctly, he thought those problems could be traced to the surface tension of gasolene. Needless to say, making fuel with molecules in 1/6 scale wasn't possible.

My understanding was that they were for his grandchildren but that was a long time ago.

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Truely amazing, ...where does one get the time and the focus to do this?....

.did he have tools, and resources available at work?

or build all this in his garage?

I feel lucky to machine something to within.001....I cant imagine the tolerances needed to cast the wheels, engine parts, and then machine them to a workable device.

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He was a fabulous machinist. I had a friend in those days (unfortunately no longer with us) who was quite friendly with him... If I remember correctly, Mr. Roy invented the iron lung. In addition to his 50HP Simplex, he also owned and restored the 1913 Grand Prix Delage.

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In reading an article in the Wentworth Way Alumni News Oct. 1975 it states Mr. Roy was going to donate one to the Larz Anderson Museum. Anyone here a member of the VMCCA ?

The article also mentioned the 1913 Delage racer (which won the Indy 500 in 1914) was donated to the Indy Museum.He had owned 32 other cars and restored 18 of them.

He did work on the iron lung ,and one might wonder if he invented a time machine down there in his basement !

An article in the Bulb Horn says he had 16,000 hours into the project .

A few more pics.

Ken

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Edited by KenHupp20 (see edit history)
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I remember following this build years ago in some magazine. If I remember correctly he had trouble with the intake manifolds icing up and thought that making bigger manifolds would solve the problem. I seem to remember he was sure that would work but he wasn't wild about compromising his perfect scale just so it would run right.

Howard Dennis

After posting the above I found this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YE_YfIGzNyw

Don't know any details as to who or when but this one sure runs great!

Edited by hddennis (see edit history)

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It seems that I'm not the sole fool on Earth! Thank you for showing these models.

Recently, I got some pictures from a Duesenberg, scale 1:6 with running engine: 8 cylinders, 4 valves per cylinder...absolutely amazing. Here is the link: http://www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com/chenot.htm

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
text modified (see edit history)

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When I was about 12 (mid 70's) I remember there being one in a museum in Boston which may have been part of the Larz Anderson Museum.

As a side note, if you have never made it there it is a MUST SEE place!!! There is a carved wood mural paneling I'd die for there, not to mention a few mechanical toys to enjoy.

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For a period in the 70s, the Larz Anderson Museum was amalgamated with the Boston Children's Museum, located on a wharf along the Boston waterfront. In preparation for this I believe that the museum directors sold a good deal of the collection. Ed Roy was a long time patron of the museum and had used his considerable influence with his fellow collectors to donate their cars. When the museum sold many of them, in a few cases while the owners were still alive, there was a huge uproar and Mr. Roy was seriously embarrassed, though he had nothing to do with the sale.

I saw the collection before it moved, after it moved and have been back to Larz Anderson Park once since it returned. My impression is that the current collection is not as impressive as it was before it was partly dispersed.

The entire amalgamation was a disaster and eventually the museum returned to the carriage house in Larz Anderson Park. Anderson, by the way, was a very wealthy man and early motoring enthusiast. He'd buy a new car every few years but never got rid of them, simply putting them in his carriage house on the estate. He was an officer in the Civil War and later a US diplomat. His mansion in Washington, D.C. is the headquarters of the Society of Cincinnati.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)

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I understand that, at one point, Dick Teague owned at least two of these. Does anyone know if they were in his house in San Diego when it burned? Or were they on loan to the San Diego museum at the time?

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Ed was a most extraordinary person/friend/machinist,, He was part of the team at Warren Collins co that did make the first iron lungs,,before the war,,and knowing Ed as I did,,I am sure it would not have happened without him.

I asked him about some of these non car things,,at the house at 11Rendall rd,,and he went on to describe the first experiments w/the kidney/blood cleaner, The question was ,,could it work at all,,once it was working and proven in a crude [??} way,,,that was the answer they needed,,it would work,, He said that first machine was about the size of a kitchen range,,but it worked,, The next project was to make it smaller,,

He restored the Renault and the Simplex in the house cellar,,and took it apart to get it out after it was finished,, Good story in the Bulb Horn,, Today the Simplex would be in preseveration class,,even the top was there,,

Does anyone know anything about the Pierce truck on the fish pier,,when the museum was there?? I posted P-A thread looking for it,,I still have the doors[its been 55years],,oh well,,Ben

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I try to find out more details about Edgar Roy as I own one of the cars he restored and used extensively. This is a 1914 Renault EF Torpedo. I read in earlier correspondence that Mr. Roy was one of the founders of AACA and also of the Larz Anderson Museum. He particpated with the Renault in the 1950 ( or 1951) Glidden Tour. Would love to find some material of that. All I have now is a small newspaper clipping.

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We used to meet on Wed nite at Larz Anderson,,and Ed was very much part of the crew,,,he lived only a few[2-?] mi from L-A,,

I dont think a founder of AACA,,,,but a member no doubt,,

He was one of the founders of VSCCA [Vintage Sports Car Club,,]

There is a good article on restoration of the Reno' in the Bulb Horn as well as the Simplex,,

I think the Reno got sold to W,H,Nichols,,,son of maker of Nichols milling machines,,

W,H N sr also owned a 1907 Reno 2 pass runabout,,nice car,,

I have driven the 07 as well as the Simplex,,but not the Reno tourer,,

Cheers,,Ben

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I have the Bulb Horn article on the Reno restoration. And yes, the Reno went to Nichols and from there to a Reno afficionado from Florida, Keith Canouse. I wanted to add a photo of the car, but I have to find out how.

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G,day to all

Jack Nelson totally overhauled the 1914 Delage indy car the only surviver of the three?

Its still here in Australia were it was brought to race on the speedway in its day.Jack told me one of his bigest problems was dissolving the residue of the caster oil.Fortunately a chemical producer came good with a "Sample" of several gallons that let Jack go on with his task.Its on page 108 of Pedr Davis book "veteran & vintage cars"isbn 0 7018 1334 2

Max Burke Nulkaba Australia

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My father knew Ed Roy very well. I can remember many meets at Larz Anderson in Brookline where Ed had the "life size" Simplex along with the scale model. All this work done before 3d printing and CMC machines. All the machining was done by hand. To see the gears inside the transmission and how well they worked together was amazing, even at my young age. 

 

My parents went on many a Glidden Tour with Ed. My dad had restored a '29 Pearce Arrow close couple sports phaeton that he and my mom used to take the tour in.

 

Such great memories.

Edited by Bill Suarez (see edit history)

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On ‎1‎/‎6‎/‎2011 at 1:48 PM, JV Puleo said:

For a period in the 70s, the Larz Anderson Museum was amalgamated with the Boston Children's Museum, located on a wharf along the Boston waterfront. In preparation for this I believe that the museum directors sold a good deal of the collection. Ed Roy was a long time patron of the museum and had used his considerable influence with his fellow collectors to donate their cars. When the museum sold many of them, in a few cases while the owners were still alive, there was a huge uproar and Mr. Roy was seriously embarrassed, though he had nothing to do with the sale.

I saw the collection before it moved, after it moved and have been back to Larz Anderson Park once since it returned. My impression is that the current collection is not as impressive as it was before it was partly dispersed.

The entire amalgamation was a disaster and eventually the museum returned to the carriage house in Larz Anderson Park. Anderson, by the way, was a very wealthy man and early motoring enthusiast. He'd buy a new car every few years but never got rid of them, simply putting them in his carriage house on the estate. He was an officer in the Civil War and later a US diplomat. His mansion in Washington, D.C. is the headquarters of the Society of Cincinnati.

Actually the Larz Anderson museum never left Brookline. It was the Museum of Transportation, that had bee hosted at Larz Anderson, that moved into Boston. Some of my Dad's cars were on display there in the 1980's. I was very happy to hear that the MOT moved back to Larz Anderson.

 

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