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Mike Lombard

1941 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet convertible V12 restoration project

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We need help with the radiator. We need someone to recore it, or we need to find a replacement. But we're a little leary about replacing it with another 70 year old radiator. Any suggestions???

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You should be able to find a radiator shop close by,,,look for one that had been in business awhile. They can remove the top and bottom tanks if necessary and clean out the original core, then solder it all back together, pressure test it for leaks and repair as necessary. I had mine done a couple of years ago and all was well internally. A re-core is also possible but hold onto your wallet for that one.

Tom

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You should be able to find a radiator shop close by,,,look for one that had been in business awhile. They can remove the top and bottom tanks if necessary and clean out the original core, then solder it all back together, pressure test it for leaks and repair as necessary. I had mine done a couple of years ago and all was well internally. A re-core is also possible but hold onto your wallet for that one.

Tom

Hi Tom,

I passed your advice on to Mike. He says he couldn't find anyone local, but found a place in Arizona that will re core it for him. Mike plans to go to the Hershey show in Oct. and look around there too.

Azscott, You're welcome!

- Scott

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I need 4 rims for my tires, now. If you have one or more, and they have the balance checked, please let me know. Maybe balance is the wrong word, but I do need them straight and unbent.

Front seat upholstery is finished ... the odd creases are just from stuff that was leaning agaisnt the seats.

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Edited by Mike Lombard (see edit history)

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I formed the nailing strip for the convertible top out of oak wood that I soaked and bent into shape. It was not an easy task, but I am very happy with the results.

post-72467-143139222951_thumb.jpg

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Beautiful work! These factory "chop jobs" really do add more work to a restoration. An old friend had the same experience with a '53 Skylark - the poor thing was full of hidden rough edges and tons of lead. On the other hand, you can take comfort that the work you do on the car is of at least the same standard, sometimes better. I'm really looking forward to the next couple of updates, when everything goes back on.

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Mike, it appears that the carb is mounted in reverse and may be a post war one if it has 4 mounting holes . Needs turning around. Also if the intake manifold has 4 bolts to mount the carb will be a 26H for 42-48 Lincolns. And, if the fuel pump has a glass bowl attached to it then it is for a 42-48 Lincoln.

Here is an ebay listing for a 3 bolt pre war intake:

1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 Lincoln Intake Manifold 3 Bolt Type | eBay

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I spoke to Mike and now I see why John Murphy brought up the carb position. After measuring the piston diameters, we've determined that the whole engine is a '46 - '48, and it has 1946 stamped on the intake. The pistons still show the original honing marks.

The grill and bumper have only been prepped for chroming, we still need to send them out. Mike chromed every little bolt and nut that was visible, himself. The really big stuff still has to be sent out. No bolt was untouched during this restoration. All rubber has been replaced. Mike even replaced the rear seal bearings which I understand was a real MFer as he had to press the bearings in through a 3 ft. long neck.

We have a group of businessmen coming to look at the car today and I'm working on a new photo album for the web page. Here are a few teaser pics for now.

- Scott

P.S. We are still trying to find the complete ownership history of the car, Vin H120652 and body is 16H56263.

11.jpg

12.jpg

Edited by Mike Lombard (see edit history)

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At this point, Mike is starting to focus more on the electrical . The back of the radio was filled with crumbled insulation, so Mike is just going to use the face of the radio.

He plans on using an 8 volt battery to power the electric instead of 6V. If anyone thinks that is not a good idea, please let us know.

Thank you, Scott

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What's wrong with the good old 6 volt system use by millions of car in the past? Properly set up...worked fine before. why not now?. Especially since you are not planning on keeping the car. Just get a 6 volt OPTIMA red top battery. Why stick a new owner with a poor sysyem Just my opinion which you asked for.

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What's wrong with the good old 6 volt system use by millions of car in the past? Properly set up...worked fine before. why not now?. Especially since you are not planning on keeping the car. Just get a 6 volt OPTIMA red top battery. Why stick a new owner with a poor sysyem Just my opinion which you asked for.

Thanks, John, I appreciate any constructive criticism. Some old timer has been bending his ear and has him sold on the 8V for better cranking power. I have been browsing the forum and 95% of posters agree with you. I think there was only one poster who said eight is great. I will pass your recommendation on to Mike.

Of course now that the car is almost done, Mike is having second thoughts about selling it right away.

- Scott

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Mike decided to do the steering wheel in wood ... pictured below in progress.

Mike took the car to the Carlisle show this weekend. The response was awesome. He has promised me more pics soon.

steeringwheel.jpg

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That wood wheel is a really nifty exercise, I would contact Keith Lee and get the proper plastic one and make the car more attractive and desireable and thus more valuable. You can find photos on this forum. Keith Lee email is

knobsoup@gmail.com

Also agree with John Murphy, those optima batteries work awesome - I use them in all my cars - six volts, original V-12s

No need to monkeyshine the car just cause someone is over-thinking it.

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Jim, you're exactly right. But Mike doesn't really need the money, so his need for artistic expression ended up trumping the dollars and the desire for 100% original authenticity on the cosmetics.

I managed to get a few progress pics from Mike.

1.jpg

2.jpg

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4.jpg

Edited by Mike Lombard (see edit history)

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The "Before and After" comparison on this car is a tremendous credit to Mike, the craftsman. He saved a car that was destined for the scrapheap.

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I really love this car! I especially like that a car that was pretty rough has been saved very nicely. The 40 and 41 Continentals are of the finest design, this is undisputed. No one has ever taken artistic expression with this car and succeeded. E. T. Gergorie and Edsel Ford got it right the first time. Raymond Lowey and Frank Lloyd Wright made modifications with out any impact. If I had a bottomless bank account I would undo the changes Wright made to the Cherokee Red cabriolet - those half moon windows look ridiculous. When in doubt, keep these cars as made originally.

Edited by Jim Zephyr (see edit history)

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The "Before and After" comparison on this car is a tremendous credit to Mike, the craftsman. He saved a car that was destined for the scrapheap.

Thanks for the kudos!

5.jpg

Right click and choose view image to see full size pic.

Edited by Mike Lombard (see edit history)

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I really love this car! I especially like that a car that was pretty rough has been saved very nicely. The 40 and 41 Continentals are of the finest design, this is undisputed. No one has ever taken artistic expression with this car and succeeded. E. T. Gergorie and Edsel Ford got it right the first time. Raymond Lowey and Frank Lloyd Wright made modifications with out any impact. If I had a bottomless bank account I would undo the changes Wright made to the Cherokee Red cabriolet - those half moon windows look ridiculous. When in doubt, keep these cars as made originally.

Fair enough, Jim. I know this is an antique car forum, and not a custom car forum. Any variation from original specs is going to be a little bit heart breaking for the hardcore antique car enthusiast.

If a potential buyer wants an exact reproduction steering wheel instead of a custom hand crafted, one-off, oak wood steering wheel, Mike will be happy to accommodate them. Same goes for an exact reproduction paint job, or exact reproduction upholstery. Mike will be happy to make those changes for a new owner.

You will be happy to know that due to the input from this forum, Mike did (reluctantly) go with the 6V replacement battery.

6.jpg

Edited by Mike Lombard (see edit history)

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Mr. Lombard you have done a beautiful restoration. I have a couple of questions because I am looking at purchasing a 1947 Continental from SC. do they have a complete frame or are they uni-body. I know the question may sound stupid but I also know that some early fords had uni-bodies like the Thunderbird.

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