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1934 Pierce-Arrow 1248A Sport Sedan Concept


Mahoning63
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Here's a what-if photoshop rendering of a sport sedan on the long wheelbase chassis, a favorite body style of mine. Front fenders have been made more fulsome and roof is lower than production models. Split windshield ties in with split grill theme. Body would not flare as much as production models, would be narrower to maintain the line established by the hood. All thoughts welcome.

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Edited by Mahoning63 (see edit history)
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Great suggestions West P., might tinker with it when I get back from vacation.

I believe I have seen pics of the LeBaron car muzzy but would be happy to get confirmation from Ernie's pic. Interestingly, was inspired somewhat by LeBaron's '34 Packard Sport Phaeton's billowing front pontoons and narrow body. The Pierce front design of 34-35 is one of the most compelling of all the Thirties classics, imho. A great basis upon which to fashion a striking custom, then and now...

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Great observation on the Riley, does look similar. Had Pierce melded the '33 Duesenberg Twenty Grand torpedo sedan with the '34 Packard LeBaron sport phaeton, something along these lines might have been the result. Interestingly, they did do sort of a shortened version of the car in the '34 836A. I used a modified 836A greenhouse for the photoshop image. The 1248A's 147" wheelbase allows it to sit at the right location... not too far back, and enables the decklid to extend sufficiently forward to balance the overall body profile.

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Hello, I haven't been able to get a photo of Ernie Follis' '34 Pierce Le Baron for comparison--other than a poor angled shot taken at Pebble Beach last summer. It isn't worth posting.

"All" radiator shells were painted (body color) starting in 1934, with only the ring around the shutters (part of the radiator shell assembly) left in chrome. Starting with the 1936 models this ring (chrome) was a separate part of the shell. So, as a suggestion, I'd redo your concept model with a painted shell, giving it a longer hood look.

West, all 1934 and '35 Pierce-Arrows (8 and V-12's) came out of the factory with painted shells. What you see today, at shows, are restorations that are over done ("the glitz look") and/or owners not knowing what their cars really looked like "when new." Plus, it's a whole lot of work removing and painting that shell once it's been plated.

Bob

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Here's a link to some pics of his car. Scroll down about half way.

2010 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Gallery - ' Pierce-Arrow' - Supercars.net

Have attached a new image with rear fenders and cooling shutters lengthened and radiator shell painted.

Have also attached a photo alteration of a Studebaker touring sedan for a would-be '36 Pierce torpedo sedan on a 139" wheelbase. Had posted this in an earlier thread but thought you might find it interesting. Roof and fenders are identical to Studebaker sedan, front doors identical to Stude coupe. Demonstrates how a little finessing on Pierce's part using existing stamped body panels could have made a nice modern car to take the company forward. Would have predated Caddy's 60 Special by two years.

Paul West

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Edited by Mahoning63 (see edit history)
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I disagree! For 1934 these vent doors are just right. I much prefer the 1935 style vent doors--identical to those used on all, 1935 through 1938 Pierce hoods; but, that's me.

Even though my 1248A will, forever, have this four vent door arrangement.

The Studebaker/Pierce-Arrow? WOW! I'd buy one!

That is some great work.

CONGRADULATIONS.

Bob Sands

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R32 - thanks for the feedback. Must admit, am unsure where to enlarge or how to make linear but I think I understand your intention. Details always make the difference once the basic shape is established.

Bob - I really appreciate your kind remarks. Would love to see a Pierce done up with such dazzling When Swing Was King styling. No holds barred! Besides being inspirational, I find these image work-ups helpful in piecing together a mental image of how Pierce might have transitioned to steel bodies and the now familiar "3-box" sedan. Studebaker had much to offer after the split.

To round out this thread's look at how a torpedo sedan might have worked on a Pierce in those years, here's a '36 on the longest wheelbase. A bit grainy but hopefully communicates the idea. Interior would have been incredibly roomy for a close-coupled layout. The 144" and 139" wheelbases could have also worked. I don't show it but envision a split windshield.

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Edited by Mahoning63 (see edit history)
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Interesting observation. The Europeans did seem to latch on to the 3-box sedan profile earlier than the Americans. It wasn't until the one-two punch from GM with the 1938 60 Special and 1940 C-body torpedo sedans that the U.S. consumer made an about-face in body style preference, particularly in the luxury car segment. Would have been a big opportunity for Pierce in the mid-Thirties had they foreseen it.

Edited by Mahoning63 (see edit history)
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