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Today, December 7th.....


Dandy Dave

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1941 is a day that will live in Infamy..... 69 years ago today we entered WWII.

I salute the Greatest Generation for their Sacrafice, and the Heros who did not come home. Least we forget.

In a short amount of time All of the Automobile manufactuers shut down production of autos and went full swing into war effort production. Buick Built the Hellcat tank. Willys produced the Jeep along with Ford, Packard produced motors to run boats and tanks. Henry J. made the Liberty Ship. Dodge Built trucks. What can you list that was produced for the war effort?

Dandy Dave!

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On a recent trip to Hawaii we spotted a Pearl Harbor Survivor with his family. Pictured together here is all 4 generations at the USS Arizona Monument. That coupled with going on board BB-63, the 'Mighty Mo' (USS Missouri), anchored bow to bow with the Arizona - guns at ready, made for a very stirring and emotional day for us. The men and women of that era certainly earned and deserve the title of 'The Greatest Generation'. Both of our parents were WWII combat veterans. May God bless and keep them all.

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Among many other products produced for the war effort (numerous prototype vehicles including the Jeep, and generators), Crosley produced the top secret proximity fuse. This device has been credited by many as being one that turned the course of the war. If you go to the club web page Crosley Automobile Club Inc.- Home for all Crosley Car Owners and go down the page to the section on the war years you can read more about it.

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Mama's oldest brother is still in the Arizona. We were never able to get the family there.

I wonder what this country would do if it happened today. Our heavy manufacturing base is miniscule compared to then, and not entirely sure the patriotism is there. I'd like to think it is though.

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My first father-in-law was on the Missouri when an enemy plane hit the deck of it and went clear down through to the water. He spoke of standing on the deck and looking down through the hole and seeing the water.

Perhaps your father-in-law served on another ship as the Missouri was only hit from all sorts of aircraft only once and the only ships repair from that event was to repaint the area. The dent still remains. Quote:

'On April 11, 1945, a Japanese A6M "Zero" Kamikaze flew into the side of the USS Missouri Battleship while it was operating off the coast of Okinawa. The plane hit the side of the ship, just below the main deck, causing a shower of debris on the deck. There was only minor damage to the ship and no casualties among the ship's crew'.

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A few nights ago, my wife and I watched "Pearl Harbor". I realize it's a movie, but it is so true to life from what I have read and heard that it still brings me to tears knowing that most of it happened that way. My buddy (and old car lover), John W. Finn, was a Medal of Honor recipient and told many stories about dragging a .50 cal. machine gun from an overturned Jeep up onto a loading dock and shooting down Japanese Zeros. He was wounded 21 times (different stories say 14 times, but who's counting) and kept on shooting. There was even a little part of the movie based on his actions. "Grab that .50 cal." can be heard from a serviceman at the airfield as it is being bombarded. It was boys like him who thought nothing of standing up to defend what we have in the face of imminent danger. My flag goes up for them and my hat comes off to them. As far as I am concerned, they are ALL heroes. Long live their memories. Here is John and his wife, Alice in the early San Diego days. Check out this website if you would like to learn more about a very heroic man.

John William Finn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Studebaker, my favorite marque, built Wright Cyclone engines for the Boeing Flying Fortress, small tracked utility vehicle "Weasel", and tens of thousands of six-by-six trucks for the supply lines and fighting fronts. Studebaker trucks were also utilized in "Lend Lease" in Russia and supposedly they call all trucks "Studebaker" there. More Studebaker trucks were in service on the Alcan highway than any other make of truck.

Studebaker built military vehicles from the Civil War to VietNam.

I might add, it is nice that such a post honoring the sacrifices of Americans on this date in history is able to be posted here, as it is on the Studebaker Drivers' Club forum. Twice today, I've tried to post a similar thread on the Edmunds' Classic Car Forum, which I do regularly, and I have to believe it has been removed both times today.

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May all of our veterans from all wars find their special place in Heaven. I am proud to say that my Dad, his Brother, my Father-in-law and four of my Dad's cousins, my Mothers Brother were all part of the Greatest Generation. Of all of them, we had one death and my Uncle was a POW being liberated at about 95 lbs, down from about 170.

Do not forget our heroes from WWII.

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That is what is wrong,,Steve,The history books the kids have do not tell all the details.I will bet most kids do not know the anthem.God is lost in all aspects.We are not allowed to bring it up.im sure my response will be deleted,but keep the love for the folks keeping us safe,and the history of our Great Country alive.A very Merry Chrismas to all

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Today, I've been thinking a lot about my father and 2 uncles. They've all passed away now. My dad spent 36 months in China, Burma, and India with the Air Corps. One uncle was a aircraft mechanic and island hopped across the Pacific with his squadron. The other uncle was a co-pilot on a Liberator - flying out of England. He and his crew perished when his bomber formation got jumped by 180 German fighters and his Liberator went down. I'm named after the uncle who didn't make it back. This generation has earned our eternal gratitude, respect, and admiration.

Regards:

Oldengineer

Vietnam Era Vet

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There have been 12 vets in my family srarting with my dad, a seabee in the Phillipines. Four others in WWII including an aunt in the waves, two in Korea one of whom also in Vietnam, and two others Vietnam era including me. I went to the annual wreath laying ceremony at the battleship New Jersey yesterday and froze my aggies off. That 887 footer is awe inspiring. It also took a kamikazi hit in WWII. The plane went over the side. Nobody was hurt but the deck was damaged. God bless all who have served, god speed to all who are now serving and god help us if we go again. This stuff in Korea has us all worried.

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1941 is a day that will live in Infamy..... 69 years ago today we entered WWII.

What can you list that was produced for the war effort?

Dandy Dave!

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Ford of Germany produced trucks and armed personnel carriers. GM of Germany's Opel division produced the Junkers JU88 Bomber/reconnaisssnce/night fighter. Trucks of various sizes, land mines and torpedo detonators.

Both companies were not nationalized into the government and communication for Ford was done through Portugal while GM contacted Opel directly throughout the war.

GM's Vauxhaul of the United Kingdom produced the Curchill tank and Jeeps. Ford also built the Rolls-Royce Merlin V-12's for Spitfires.

Don

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That is what is wrong,,Steve,The history books the kids have do not tell all the details.I will bet most kids do not know the anthem.God is lost in all aspects.We are not allowed to bring it up.im sure my response will be deleted,but keep the love for the folks keeping us safe,and the history of our Great Country alive.A very Merry Chrismas to all

God it not lost everywhere, thankfully, o.c.f.!

I had a uncle, my mom's brother, who gave his life in the Battle of the Bulge. From old pictures and what my mom has told me about him, he was really into cars and motorcycles. I never had the pleasure of meeting him.

Battleships were also mentioned in this thread--I had the great thrill of staying overnight once on Big Mamie (USS Massachusetts) over in Fall River, MA a few years ago, when I accompanied my son's cub scout toop. What a thrill to wander all over that ship, hear many stories of its history, plus view a tremendous display of collected PT Boat artifacts, and on and on. It's an experience I'd recommend to anyone.

Once again, Thanks Veterans, and May God Bless.

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Studebaker, my favorite marque, built Wright Cyclone engines for the Boeing Flying Fortress, small tracked utility vehicle "Weasel", and tens of thousands of six-by-six trucks for the supply lines and fighting fronts. Studebaker trucks were also utilized in "Lend Lease" in Russia and supposedly they call all trucks "Studebaker" there. More Studebaker trucks were in service on the Alcan highway than any other make of truck.

Studebaker built military vehicles from the Civil War to VietNam.

I might add, it is nice that such a post honoring the sacrifices of Americans on this date in history is able to be posted here, as it is on the Studebaker Drivers' Club forum. Twice today, I've tried to post a similar thread on the Edmunds' Classic Car Forum, which I do regularly, and I have to believe it has been removed both times today.

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The B-17 didn't use Wright engines. The B-17's came with four Pratt & Whitney R 1820-97 nine cylinder radials @ 1,200 HP.

Wright did make a 1820-9, but not for the B-17. When I was in the navy in ASW we used these (2) engines (Wright) in our S-2 Tracker, this engine was rated @ 1,525 HP, later we changed planes to P2V Neptunes which had two Double Wasp (double row) Wright 18 cylinder 3,350 cu. inch with three power recovery turbines at 3,500 HP, plus two Westinghouse J-34 TurboJets. The B-29 SuperFortress also used Wright 3,350's.

Another engine to mention is the Wright double Wasp R 2800 eighteen cylinder which found homes in the F-6F Hellcat, F-8F Bearcat, F-4U Corsair 1 (that bent wing bird is my favorite) , and the P-47 Thunderbolt.

Pratt & Whitney also made a 4360" quad wasp (rows) radial- twenty eight cylinder but I don't know what planes it went into, but because this engine was after the war it was already obsolete because of the jets.

Don

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Pratt & Whitney also made a 4360" quad wasp (rows) radial- twenty eight cylinder but I don't know what planes it went into, but because this engine was after the war it was already obsolete because of the jets.

Don

The P&W R-4360 Wasp Major 'corncob' engine was used in the Boeing B-50, (the last development of the B-29), the Convair B-36, the Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar, the Boeing 377 Stratocruiser airliner and the Goodyear F2G (version of the Corsair), among others. In some variations, 4300 HP could be had. The engine was reliable enough but it required proper maintenance and TBO was about 600 HRS. If you never heard one (if you hear one, you usually hear 4, except for the F2G), you have missed one of the most audible and sensual assaults on the human body - ever! If an aircraft at an airshow is so equipped, which is very rare these days, people will scramble to hear Wasp Major music.

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I'm looking at a full-page Studebaker magazine ad from the '40's. It says, quote, "Studebaker builds huge quantities of Wright Cyclone engines for the Boeing Flying Fortress"...in two places in the ad.

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Look it up in Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation, plus I've been in and around one before. The little metal data tag on the front of the engine case dosen't lie.

Don

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The P&W R-4360 Wasp Major 'corncob' engine was used in the Boeing B-50, (the last development of the B-29), the Convair B-36, the Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar, the Boeing 377 Stratocruiser airliner and the Goodyear F2G (version of the Corsair), among others. In some variations, 4300 HP could be had. The engine was reliable enough but it required proper maintenance and TBO was about 600 HRS. If you never heard one (if you hear one, you usually hear 4, except for the F2G), you have missed one of the most audible and sensual assaults on the human body - ever! If an aircraft at an airshow is so equipped, which is very rare these days, people will scramble to hear Wasp Major music.

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Thanks Uncle Buck! I thought B-36's had them. While I had Jane's open in the thread above I should have looked. When I was a kid B-36's would fly very very high over our house and on a clear day with a telescope you could see them. Even at that height the sound of those engines (6 of them) was unmistakable for sure!

Don

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I'd trust what the manufacturer said at the time of manufacture, over a third-party in a reference book decades later. I can't tell you how many errors of basic fact I find in "reference" books about collector cars today.

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I'd trust what the manufacturer said at the time of manufacture, over a third-party in a reference book decades later. I can't tell you how many errors of basic fact I find in "reference" books about collector cars today.

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I just told you I have seen one up close. How much proof do you need? The reason I looked was because I thought they used the same 1820's that we used in our S-2's :rolleyes:

Don

BTW Jane's is considered one of the "bible's" in the aviation world

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Hey you WWII Air Craft Experts, What can you tell me about an emblem that says, Pratt& Whitney Dependable Engines around the outside and made by Buick above an Eagle. Dandy Dave!

Nice keepsake!

Late in 1940, William S. Knudsen, then director of the National Defense Advisory Committee and coordinator of America's defense program selected Buick to undertake the difficult assignment of producing Pratt & Whitney aircraft engines. Within a week from the time the project had been announced, Buick engineers and production men were busy with plans for construction of a plant to build the engines.

Harlow H. Curtice, Buick President & General Manager, took personal charge of Buick's war production team. Automobile production methods were adapted to the engine job to give the Army the 1,000-a-month volume it desired. In March 1941, ground was broken for Buick's new engine plant at Melrose Park, Illinois, and six months later the huge building was virtually completed. The first engine was completed and accepted by the government in January, 1942, months ahead of schedule. This plant continued to keep ahead of schedule and, during the war, delivered to the Army 74,797 engines, enough for 18,699 four-motored Liberator bombers.

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  • 11 months later...
There have been 12 vets in my family srarting with my dad, a seabee in the Phillipines. Four others in WWII including an aunt in the waves, two in Korea one of whom also in Vietnam, and two others Vietnam era including me. I went to the annual wreath laying ceremony at the battleship New Jersey yesterday and froze my aggies off. That 887 footer is awe inspiring. It also took a kamikazi hit in WWII. The plane went over the side. Nobody was hurt but the deck was damaged. God bless all who have served, god speed to all who are now serving and god help us if we go again. This stuff in Korea has us all worried.

Boy what a difference in the weather from last year,about 40 degrees.

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You beat me to it. Today is December 6th guys.

I wanted it up before Midnight, so I jumped the gun a little. There is a little group of Ex Vets on here that have given me the honor, and granted me the duty to post Pearl Harbor Day. Least we not forget. Dandy Dave!

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For HELFEN & 63STUDE:

Pictures are from the EAA's B-17 on it's 2010 summer tour. My pilot buddies here say; 'There are old pilots and there are bold pilots, but, there are no old-bold pilots...'

Peace out.

Local fellow just passed at age 93. He learned to fly in a biplane before the War, flew military transports from Alaska, became a commercial pilot and flew everything with wings up to and including the 747 before he retired with over 33000 hours in the air. He claimed to have never had an accident of any type.

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This is the USS OGLALA, a Coastal Minelayer (ex-CM-4) that was outboard of the Cruiser USS HELENA,

at a dock where the Battleship USS PENNSYLVANIA was usually berthed. A torpedo passed under

the OGLALA and hit the HELENA, caving in OGLALA's side, and she began flooding.

Two tugs pulled her out of the way so the HELENA could move out.

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The OGLALA was refloated and reclassified as a Repair Ship (ARG-1). My Uncle Warren was a Warrant

Officer on the OGLALA, transferred to San Diego a week before the attack, and I never had the chance

to ask him much about his wartime experiences.

If you ever have the opportunity, visit the Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor; it's something you'll never forget.

TG

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Dad was abandoned at age 12 and was a bit of a wild child and was in the local jail for drunk and disorderly on this day in 1941. Warden came around and released all those facing minor charges if they agreed to enlist. Dad lied about his age and signed up, primarily so he could get 3 meals a day. Hats off to that generation.

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Thanks to AACA, I became friends with Len Jackson. Len was stationed on a submarine in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He was a good friend. Unfortunately, like many of his comrades, he died a few years ago. I was honored to play the bagpipes at his funeral. We need to all continue to remember as the years go by, as fewer and fewer of the survivors are still with us.

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