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Today, December 7th.....


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....1941 is a day that will live in infamy. 69 Years ago today America entered WWII. Everyone pulled together for the war effort. Buick, and the employees of Buick was no exception as the Hellcat tank was produced. :cool:

I salute the Greatest Generation for their sacafice, and the Heros who never came home. It was no small effort. Least we not forget. Dandy Dave!

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....1941 is a day that will live in infamy. 69 Years ago today America entered WWII. Everyone pulled together for the war effort. Buick, and the employees of Buick was no exception as the Hellcat tank was produced. :cool:

I salute the Greatest Generation for their sacafice, and the Heros who never came home. It was no small effort. Least we not forget. Dandy Dave!

Amen Dave.

Dan

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May all of our veterans from all wars find their special place in Heaven. I am proud to say that my Dad, his Brother, my Father-in-law and four of my Dad's cousins, my Mothers Brother were all part of the Greatest Generation. Of all of them, we had one death and my Uncle was a POW being liberated at about 95 lbs, down from about 170.

Do not forget our heroes from WWII.

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Old guy. Thanks for the video it was very moving. I too think all the vets to let me speak English for without them there would be no freedom in America. again thank you very much.

frank

have a great Buick day

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I am proud to say that my father was a Pearl Harbor survivor. At the time, he was a Gunners Mate Petty Officer 2nd and was on deck of his assigned ship..the USS Oklahoma...when the first torpedo hit. He served 30 years in the Navy (1936 - 1966) obtaining the rank of Senior Chief Petty Officer at the time of his retirement. Unfortunately, I lost him to lung cancer in 1981 at the age of 64...too young.

My brother (a year younger than me) was also a veteran...Spc 5 Crane Operator Army Engineers, 1969 - 1973. He served/was stationed in Vietnam twice in the early 1970's. I lost him in 2006. Again, way too young.

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Thank you for this post Dave. I would have responded sooner but I made a little trip today. Lest we forget indeed. Just think, it happened 69 years ago. Every day we loose more and more of the heroes of that day and of that war. Today I visited the nursing home where my mom had lived. The nurses all knew me and I told them why I was there. I walked down the hall and made conversation with many of the old timers. I finally came to one who said he did indeed serve in World War II. He was in the Navy and said he "remembered Pearl Harbor". Through out the conversation I couldn't tell if he had been there or just remembered it. He spoke of being on a ship named USS Bryon that got hit by a torpedo but didn't sink until it got into port. We talked a little about Vietnam and what was going on in Afganistan and Iraq now. He wasn't "aware" of any of that. I asked him what was his favorite car and GUESS WHAT HE SAID..... Chevrolet. Oh well.. I told him all about the Buicks and he said he liked them too but could never afford one. I thanked him for his service and gave him a big hug and handshake. He was smiling when I left. Me too. Through my tears.

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My Dad served in the Army in WWII. Drafted in Oct 1942, trained and served stateside until Feb. 1945 when he was posted to the Phillipines in preparation for Operation Olympic which was the invasion of the Japanese homeland scheduled for September 1945. Estimated GI casualties...70%. Like many GIs he didn't want to talk much about his service; however, during his last two years with us I was able to get a little more out of him. God Bless all our troops both active and retired for all they have done. I thank Harry Truman for his decision in August 1945. I was adopted and may never have been able to know the person who became my Dad.

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On December 7th as with all military related holidays I think of the words that President Lincoln spoke at Gettysburg. How far reaching into the future they've come "their last full measure of devotion". If we ever forget those who have given their all for us as a people, a country then GOD help us. Here's to all who served or are serving God bless and keep you all.

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My Dad served in the Army in WWII. Drafted in Oct 1942, trained and served stateside until Feb. 1945 when he was posted to the Phillipines in preparation for Operation Olympic which was the invasion of the Japanese homeland scheduled for September 1945. Estimated GI casualties...70%. Like many GIs he didn't want to talk much about his service; however, during his last two years with us I was able to get a little more out of him. God Bless all our troops both active and retired for all they have done. I thank Harry Truman for his decision in August 1945. I was adopted and may never have been able to know the person who became my Dad.

My father also served in WW II, he also doesnt speak of it much. I went out to dinner with him last night. He was also in the pacific theatre and I also thank President Truman for the decision he made. My Father served in Bangalore India and Im sure if operation Olympic would have gone through that many many soldiers could hagve been killed and who knows with my Father already serving in the pacific how things would have turned out.

Thank you to all our veterans.

Dan

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Not to start another war here but I want to remind everyone that "America" did not join the war on this day..... The US did! There are more countries to this continent then the US!

Here is a little bit of a history lesson written by a close friend of mine and learned scholar:

Larry:

Sorry for the delay in responding to you. I do indeed remember that conversation (and the fine whiskey and cigars!), though I feel that I prattled on somewhat. Let's see now ... it went something like this:

On a soft summer night in 2005 on the banks of a lake in southern Maine -- on their country's birthday no less -- American friends (Bostonians) and yours truly were imbibing (in inferior drink, I might add) and smoking (again, inferior cigars) when our gracious host wondered of me why Canada had not supported the US in its “War on Terror”. I asked if my response could recount some world history in the effort to be true to our nation's stand, and would they be so kind as to give me sufficient time to state Canada's case -- they agreed.

I began by expressing the view that Canada's (and, before it joined the Canadian confederation in 1949, Newfoundland and Labrador as a British colony) participation in various wars over the past 100 years demonstrated that Canadians (and Newfoundlanders) did indeed have the fortitude to stand and deliver, whatever the cause(s).

When Great Britain declared war on Germany in Sept. 1914 Newfoundland automatically joined. Canada, as a separate dominion, joined with GB a few days later. On July 1st, 1916 -- the opening day of the Battle of the Somme (to this date the costliest battle in lives in British military history) -- hundreds of Newfoundlanders were killed and wounded. In short, Canadians and Newfoundlanders were not shy of combat. Meanwhile, Great Britain (touted by Americans as their greatest and strongest ally in the “War on Terror”) could not convince the US to join WWI. In fact, while the British, Canadians and Newfoundlanders were slogging it out in the trenches of France and elsewhere, Americans stayed home. The US joined in 1917, a year before WW I ended. Though it is arguable that WWI was not a “War on Terror”, the point is that Americans should not doubt that Canadians and Newfoundlanders have the balls to mix it up -- indeed, we should doubt American resolve to help us, their ideological partners.

When Great Britain declared war on Nazi Germany (and the Axis powers) in Sept, 1939 Newfoundlanders, living in GB's oldest colony, were on side straight away. Canada declared war on Germany and its fascist buddies a week later. Adolf Hitler was one son-of-a-*****, a ruthless dictator whose campaign of terror against all sorts -- Russians, Poles, Jews, etc. -- goes down in world history as the most brutal chapter in evil. The British stood against the terrorist Hitler (who makes Hussein look like the proverbial Boy Scout), Canadians stood shoulder to shoulder with the British in the struggle for freedom from tyranny, and Newfoundlanders fought side by side with the British in the most important struggle to date in world history -- to end the tyranny and expansionism of fascist dictatorships in Germany and Italy. The US did not join the ultimate “War on Terror” in 1939, they stayed away from the fight in 1940, they hid across the Atlantic in 1941. During these years Winston Churchill begged the US to side with it -- when the Luftwaffe was bombing the hell out of great English cities, Canadians flew under the RAF to strike out at the might of the Nazi bomber raids. After Pearl Harbour, the US finally decided to engage mankind`s enemy. Thousands of Canadians and Newfoundlanders had died for freedom in the years before a single American soldier fired a shot in WWII. Don’t talk to a proud Canadian or Newfoundlander about what we did when the world`s free peoples were under attack -- Americans should not question our resolve.

Canada (and its newest province) joined forces with the Americans in the Korean Conflict (1950-53), under the auspices of the UN. Canada did not support the Vietnam War, but then again as it turned out, neither did the Americans. Canada supported the US in the Gulf War (1991), firing our first shots in combat since Korea.

On 9-11, Canadians died in New York, too. Shortly after 9-11, 100,000 Canadians marched on Parliament Hill, Ottawa, in open, vivid and passionate support of our American cousins. Canada joined the “War on Terror”, sending its troops to Afghanistan, where the terrorists trained. When G. Bush decided to invade Iraq, Canadians were dubious -- not one hijacker came from Iraq, it had no “weapons of mass destruction”, and its dictator had been supported by US policy for years. We feared another Vietnam (we were right). The record shows that we have now been in Afghanistan nearly ten years -- fighting of late in hellish Helmand province. We were -- and are -- not afraid to fight terrorism.

Finally, all around the historical and beautiful area where I live -- Harbour Grace, NL -- lie the buried remains of men who fought terrorism, and to ask of me “Why aren`t Canadians supporting Americans in the ‘War on Terror’?” is an insult to their sacrifice.

Larry, as a proud Canadian, I cannot suffer to silently listen when Americans argue that they lead the fight for liberty, that they lead the “War on Terror”. History is my rebuttal.

Enjoy the Scotch and cigars, me son,

Des.

Larry:

In my rant I neglected to include these highly relevant facts:

As the infamous day of 9-11 unfolded, the Canadian province which took in by far the most American citizens, gave them hotels, halls and homes, was Newfoundland. More than 10,000 mostly American citizens found refuge in my province, having landed in Gander, Stephenville, Goose Bay and St. John's. The American government effectively condemned their airborne citizens to death, having denied in-bound planes American airspace. With insufficient fuel with which to return to Europe/Asia (and, if my memory serves, having been denied landing privileges back in Europe even if they could return), and risking certain catastrophe on a scale which would have dwarfed the casualty figures of the terrorist attacks if they were to mass-ditch at sea, Americans found sanctuary in Newfoundland/Canada. On 9-11, planes flying both trans-oceanic routes bound for the US landed on the soil of a friend. And you wonder why we didn't support you? Many Americans on those forsaken flights felt that their government abandoned them in their hour of need. Canada did not. Newfoundlanders and Labradorians did not. I ask: "Would the US have done the same for us?"

I could go on and on, a reflection of the umbrage with which I take as to the opinions voiced by those self-absorbed, ill-informed, (though otherwise great) neighbours of ours to the south who question Canada's resolve to fight the "War on Terror".

Having finished, I purposefully raised a glass to offer a toast to our American friends on the 4th of July.

Righto,

Des.

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Des,

I respect your staements and understand your national pride. Howevere there are two points I would like to make . Not in an attempt to stir the pot but just to set the record straight.

In the years prior to our entry into WW II the Roosevelt administration did supply arms and goods to europe and the British Isles under the lend -lease agreement . Granted we did not supply any troops but we did supply some of the neccesary materials needed so that England could continue to fight. By doing so we put our merchant marines at risk running the gauntlet through Hitlers U-Boat blockade of England. Some were killed when their ships were torpedoed out from under them. Even though they were flagged as U.S. vessels (at that time a neutral country) The U boat commanders knew whatwas going on and torpedoed U.S. as well as British merchantmen.

Also U.S. pilots flew with both the RAF and the Chinese airforce prior to our involvement in WWII on a volunteer basis. These pilots could have in your words "hid across the atlantic" but they chose not to. I honestly cant remember what the name was for the pilots that flew with the RAF (Im doing most of this response from memory) But those that flew in the pacific for the chinese were known as the "Flying Tigers".

Dan

Edited by Dans 77 Limited (see edit history)
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Slightly different, but still remembers our incredible WWII brothers and sisters.

Enjoy:

YouTube - I Fought For You By The Sound Tank

As for our Canadian friends, I had the honor to work with many Canadians at the North American region of NORAD at Tyndall during Operation Noble Eagle. There's not a finer group of people in uniform anywhere in the world. As for the hospitality of Canadians in the aftermath of 9-11, they are well remembered at NORAD, as this photo was part of the briefing we gave visitors to show how closely our nations work together:

Gander-Airport-September-12-low-res.jpg

Notice there is everything here from a USAF C-5 to a civilian 747, and everything in between.

Edited by Reatta Man (see edit history)
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This thread started about the people, the men a women who gave their lives for freedom. It really is what we need to think about more when we do actually think about the sacrifices made rather than what team they were on.

That being said I want to applaud Des for stating what is far too often over looked.... That we Canadians have a deep and very honourable Military record, we are always ready to stand and fight when called upon....it needs to be repeated often as there are some who may be not aware.

I have a couple of videos I pull out every Remembrance Day I think they speak best to what Des was talking about and also speaks directly about the people...the men and women that gave their lives to allow us to enjoy our debates on why they made the ultimate sacrifice. The interesting part is these clips are told by Americans

On a side note..Lamar, your story weighed heavy on me. My Dad and I used to go to the Veterans home and bring all kinds of "Contraband" for them to enjoy. We spent some time and just listened...they just want to tell their story. I have not done this in years and will be sure to call Pops for another run over the holidays, to see a couple of heroes and thank them for their service and listen to one more story.

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Edited by stealthbob (see edit history)
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Thriller you are correct about the AVG , that was their official title , their knickname was the flying tigers. Thats what happens when you type without looking facts up first LOL.

Eagle Squadron was the name I couldnt remember. Ddi they fly as completely seperate units from the RAF or were they incorporated into already existing RAF squadrons ?

Like I said Im not trying to crush anyones national pride , I myself have always felt that Canada has been a great ally to the U.S. I was up at the falls a few years ago, just months before the passport requirement went into effect. It was the Canadian border guard who reminded me that if I wanted to come back anytime soon I should start working on the passport not the U.S. border guard .... strange huh?

Dan

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Dan - from what I recall on a TV program, the American pilots were organized into their own squadrons...hence calling them the Eagle squadrons. They typically were given planes of American manufacture to fly as well rather than Spitfires. Of course, in war, it wouldn't surprise me that there would have been some exceptions to both of these.

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  • 11 months later...

I guess most everything has been said at this point. A comment to <!-- google_ad_section_start(weight=ignore) -->cobravii<!-- google_ad_section_end --><SCRIPT type=text/javascript> vbmenu_register("postmenu_824461", true); </SCRIPT> tho', I have never really thought of Canada and it's people as other than almost an extension of the US. I was nine in 1941, but my brother visited Italy and made it back home. B-29 training and a trip to Japan and Korea was the best I could manage. I just wish things were still as simple as they were back then.

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SALUTE

The History Channel will have a 2 hour special tonight. "Pearl Harbor: 24 Hours After" at 8 p.m. ET

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Thanks Dave for bringing this back again this year.

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Dave;

Thank you for this thread honoring our veterans. I am somewhat younger than many of you, but it struck me that I do not know much about what the various car companies built (other than Crosley) during the war. Would it be appropriate to discuss here or should I start another thread?

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Dave;

Thank you for this thread honoring our veterans. I am somewhat younger than many of you, but it struck me that I do not know much about what the various car companies built (other than Crosley) during the war. Would it be appropriate to discuss here or should I start another thread?

This is open to discuss anything produced by any Auto, or any other manufacturing company that helped win the war. Please feel free to post away. :D Dandy Dave!

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Thanks Dave, I did not want to draw away from the men and women who made this country great and free.

I am interested in what the various car countries did during the war. Crosley was one of the developers of the "Jeep" and was the only one that met the government's weight requirement, however, the CT3 or Pup as it was called was underpowered (using the 2 cylinder Waukesha) and was not accepted for manufacture. About 36 prototypes were built and a number of them still exist. They also bulit a number of other prototypes such as 2 and 3 wheel motorcycles and other vehicles such as a Willys style "Mule" , an amphibious "duck" and a snow tractor.

Crosley built generators for all branches of the services for ground use as well as air and PT boat usage. Their biggest contribution was development and manufacture of the "proximity fuse" which used radio waves to detect and explode near a target rather than on contact with it. Crosley manufactured over 5 million of these devices during the war. The fuze has been credited with shortening the war substantially as well as thwarting many of the V2 rocket attacks in Great Britian.

Edited by DAVE A (see edit history)
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Here's what I know:

International Harvester built the 2 1/2 ton Army trucks in enormous quantities at the Fort Wayne plant.They also staffed the Bettendorf Tank Arsenal with people from Farmall and then asked for all the farm boys to transfer from other plants to keep Farmall running. My uncle Kenneth Corbin went from Springfield Ohio to Farmall in Rock Island IL. ca 1943.

Buick built the engines for the Liberator Bombers in a new plant in Melrose Park IL. I think about 80,000 engines were made.

Buick also built Hellcat tank destroyers, a bunch of ammo shells and other stuff.

Fors built Liberator bombers at Willow Run, 800 per month by late 1944 and a bunch of Jeeps, also built by Willys.

DeSoto built Mitchell B26 bomber fuselages.

GM of Canada built 345,000 Chevrolet trucks for the Commonwealth armies.

Cadillac made the Norden bombsight under license. There's a story that the Cadillac General Manager told the GM brass not to ask where he was going to get people. He then hired every whore in Detroit (they were used to delicate work!). That workforce did a better job than the Norden people themselves!

This is just what I can remember off the top of my head.

Regards, Dave Corbin

Edited by DaveCorbin (see edit history)
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  • 11 months later...

Remember Pearl Harbor, indeed, and all those who sacrificed so that we could be free......I was a son of that great generation, spending my youngest years watching the pride and progress that the United States was making, in the 1950's and 60's........ and pray that the younger generation will honor what they've been given, and not take it for granted.....

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  • 11 months later...

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