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Someone save this car!!


sambarn

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I was searching craigslist for a modern car and found this ad. I need more projects like Carter needs liver pills but I thought I'd put it out here. It's located about twenty miles from my house and looks amazing!! a 1927 Cadillac Opera Sedan(?) 4 door with suicide doors, dual side mounts, what appear to be Buffalo Wire Wheels, original as can be by appearances with stonegaurd, mascot, headlight lenses. Man's been storing it for a long time waiting to streetrod it and decided to sell. He's asking 9000, I don't know value but it seems extremely complete and I'd be glad to go look at it for someone if there's an interest. He's trying to sell it as a potential street rod and well, that just hurts me. Thought I'd see if someone would want it. - Sam

sale-ftanr-2083765733@craigslist.org

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I believe that's a 1930 or 1931 Cadillac, not a 1927. Definately worth the $9000. I bet $7000 or $7500 cash gets it. The only problem is it would cost way over $100,000 to restore it, and when you're done you have a $50,000 car.

That would explain the wheels. I do not believe that would be a $50,000 car, even with a very nice restoration. Of course, that seems to be the problem with every unrestored car.

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I know... i'm weird.... but this cad with doing just a clean-up and mechanically repaired would be GREAT to enjoy 'AS IS'!!!

I agree it sounds like a good idea - it would be great to see it on the road in as-found condition - but it depends how bad it is mechanically. If those tyres have been on the wheels for long enough the rims may be rusted - I found that out the hard way many years ago with my 1928 wire-wheeled Studebaker.

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Don't hang me, but it's the perfect candidate for a RestoMod.

Avoid the expense of a mechanical restoration and replace the

running gear with modern stuff from a good donor car and it

becomes economically more palatable. The costs might be less

and it could look the same, still a classy looking really old Cadillac.

The body paint, glass, interior costs could be less and in the

end you would still have a mighty classic looking Cadillac that

was usable and could be driven anywhere instead of becoming

a trailer queen. The chances of becoming a AACA touring car are

about 5% if stock and 50% of being usable if a RestoMod.

Now you know why some of us like both kinds of antique cars.

(I don't mean chopped and channeled with a blower and drag slicks

or painted purple with yellow trim, I mean to look restored, but able

to be driven and enjoyed without another mortgage on the farm.)

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Paul, You are not alone with that opinion. I don't know if those bodies are a ton of lumber with tin tacked to it or not, but that would be a major cost of the rebuild. Stone stock body with modern drive train and you have a wedding car that could make the owner a few bucks. It would eat up $50,000 real fast, and I don't think many people are out there looking for projects like this.

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Guest Jim_Edwards
I know... i'm weird.... but this cad with doing just a clean-up and mechanically repaired would be GREAT to enjoy 'AS IS'!!!

Agreed! It doesn't appear it would take too much to "freshen" that old gal up to be a lot of fun for weekend cruising. No need to think about some sort of modern drive train, the old flat head V8 in her was not exactly anemic.

Jim

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Guest De Soto Frank
Is this in the range of years where the fuel pump was driven off of the oil pressure? Dandy Dave!

Shouldn't be... I believe you're referring to the Stewart Vacuum tank that some cars ran off suction from the oil-pump; others utilized intake vacuum.

Since the first "new" Chevy six in 1929 used a mechanical fuel pump, driven off the camshaft, I would presume that by 1931, all GM cars had abandoned the Stewart vacuum-tank.

I find it interesting that many folks who have commented on the car feel that it would bring no more than $50,000 restored... seems low to me...

That said, "what to do with it" kind of depends on its overall condition; if the body wood & tin is intact and usable, the drivetrain is all there needing only cleaning and lubrication to make it go, then it would probably be feasible as a survivor-driver or a resto project...

If the wood is all rotten, the engine frozen, lots of parts missing, etc, then it becomes more and more of a money pit.

I would hate to see this car become fodder for a rod project.

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Actually $50,000.00 sounds like a GOOD price in this econamy. And restoration costs would be easily double. These cars have a very complicated wood structure. For $50,000.00 you can probably get the BEST original survivor in existence, and have a lifetime keeper. These are wonderful cars, but a restoration expense nightmare. For only a little more you start to get into open car territory {well V8 at least}. An open car might come close to paying back restoration costs , especially if long term ownership is in the plan.

Greg in Canada

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Shouldn't be... I believe you're referring to the Stewart Vacuum tank that some cars ran off suction from the oil-pump; others utilized intake vacuum.

Since the first "new" Chevy six in 1929 used a mechanical fuel pump, driven off the camshaft, I would presume that by 1931, all GM cars had abandoned the Stewart vacuum-tank.]

Actually the vacuum tank (or tanks) was used up through 1931, at least on the V12 and V16, not sure about the V8.

I agree with Greg, that $50,000 value is way high for a V8 sedan these days.

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Jogging my memory, I believe one that I once helped a friend with was a 1926 or 27 Cadillac 8. When I first saw the oil pressure lines to the Fuel pump I was a little puzzeled until I pulled out my Dykes manual from the late 20's. First time I saw an oil pressure driven one. My first impression was.... What were they thinking? Was the oil pressure driven tank only used on Cadillac's of the mid to late 20's?

The manifold vacumm tanks I have seen, and worked on for years. Infact, my 1915 Buick has one. Dandy Dave!

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Was the oil pressure driven tank only used on Cadillac's of the mid to late 20's?

The 1928 Chrysler 52 I once owned used a vacuum generated off the oil pump to pull fuel into the vacuum tank. The beauty of the setup is that if the oil pump quits the fuel soon runs out and the engine stops.

Don

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The 1928 Chrysler 52 I once owned used a vacuum generated off the oil pump to pull fuel into the vacuum tank. The beauty of the setup is that if the oil pump quits the fuel soon runs out and the engine stops.

Don

My 1929 Canadian-built Plymouth - essentially a continuation of the Chrysler 52- still has that setup in it. It works great, even on long climbs.
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My 1929 Canadian-built Plymouth - essentially a continuation of the Chrysler 52- still has that setup in it. It works great, even on long climbs.

The thought did cross my mind that a vacumm tank could run out on a long climb just like the vacumm wiper motors would stop when you really stepped on it. I could see where this would be an advantage. With that said, the first year the Stewart vacumm tank was used on a Buick was 1915. I have never had a problem with my 15 running out of fuel and there are some pretty stout hills around here. So I take it there were a number of middle to higher end cars that used this "oil pressure over vacumm" system several years before the mechanical fuel pump became common place. Dandy Dave!

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The Cad has an external vacuum pump as backup to intake vacuum.

I agree that this car would be best to leave as is after getting it running. I have original cars and street rods. BUT NEVER in NO WAY would I EVER consider a complete grand old Cadillac like this to become a Street Rod project.

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