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I thought it was a steam car hood, but maybe it a belly pan?


pmdolan

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I am trying to ID this part for a widow in her 80's. My first thought because of the odd shape was that it was a steam era hood. After taking time to look at the photos I took, I think it may be some sort of engine belly splash pan. Her late husband was into teen's Overland's. That may be a clue. Does anyone have a guess?

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Guest Silverghost

It appears to be a belly pan. These were often taken-off and are now often long gone~

There appears to be dirty grease still on the inside top edges.

I nave no clue as to what car this was once from ? ~

Perhaps someone can ID it from your photos.

Edited by Silverghost (see edit history)
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Guest willshela

What is that? Is that an old part of the car?

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word stencil

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What is that? Is that an old part of the car?

------------

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word stencil

yes, it is an old car part, it is an engine belly pan as stated above

WHAT it came off of is the question we are trying to answer

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Interesting that it made from several pieces which suggests the maker did not have a very big press. I guess to identify it you will have to go to some antique car shows and crawl under all of those that have belly pans. If you could track down the Hudson one linked on the bottom of this page it would be a start.

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It would appear that the shallow end is forward to mate with the front crossmember, that would make this for a left hand drive vehicle with 2 semi-eliptic front springs ( deducing from the cutouts). Most pans were removed early on as they accumulated grease and oil and with the occasional gasoline were a huge fire hazard!

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