Sign in to follow this  
1937hd45

Getting the MOST for a 1985 Ford LTD

Recommended Posts

I need your advice for getting the MOST I CAN for a second owner 1985 Ford Crown Victoria Fordor. Two tone blue, V8 Automatic, air etc. What are the rare high demand items I need to mention, do matching numbers help boost its value? We had planned to show it at Hershey, but just ran out of time. Tips and advice are most welcomed. :)

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just make sure you use the word "CLASSIC" in your ad. That's sure to generate unbridled excitiement and enthusiasm for your car.

I forgot, does 1985 still have throttle body fuel injection, or was that the first year for the aluminum plenum chamber on top of the engine?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The car is old enough to get "Early American" plates here in Connecticut, just like the Brass Era cars, so it is Antique as well as Classic. It has the throttle body fuel injection, and wire wheel hub caps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you really want to get the maximum possible return I suggest you lock it in a climate controlled garage for 100 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like the funds for Christmas 2010.:D

If you really want to get the maximum possible return I suggest you lock it in a climate controlled garage for 100 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Crown Vic? Hell, there's only one group of people who want those anymore--guys like me who always wanted a police car. How about something along these lines:

"It's got a cop motor, a 440 cubic inch plant, it's got cop tires, cop suspension, cop shocks. It's a model made before catalytic converters so it'll run good on regular gas."

bluesbros.jpg

Or maybe call it the "last of the V8 Inteceptors..."

ford_interceptor_actf34_fe_1_717.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd go with ebay. I have sold a few vehicles that way. Even with all of the changes in the ebay format, you will still get the most exposure from that venue. You may get a couple of hundred on the "Crown Vic" site or "craigslist", but with ebay, MILLIONS of people will see and one of them (or hopefully two or three) may want that car. You get two guys or more that want it and the fight is on!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This fine vehicle is 20 years too new for the HAMB, but AACA Show Field ready:).

Instal a orange crate in it and advertize on the H.A.M.B. (;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Taxi cab guys still love these cars in Philly !

They are always looking for good clean solid big four doors like the LTD & Chevy Caprice.

Easy to repair~

Easy to find parts~

As for it's real collector car value ~

Who Knows ???

Edited by Silverghost (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While some are poking fun at an '85 Crown Vic, as a "modern antique" it sounds like a great tour car or a good "first car" car for someone to enter the antique car hobby and enjoy the fun. Not everyone can own an Auburn/Cord/Duesenberg. I hope it finds a good home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it has had a loving home both across the street with the original owner and with us for two years, seeing get the same love means a lot to us, unless the new owner pays us more that we think it is worth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...and as long as they pay a great price for it........then it's next life is of no concern....reminds me of Hershey, had a pair of large rear fenders, found out later that they were late 30's GMC truck.....guy was buying them at my price, glad to get rid of them, I asked what are you using them on? He said he'd rather not tell me....ah, c'mon. A hot rod he mumbled......oh well, would rather find someone who needed them, but hard to do when you don't know what they are......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would stress something you've already said: AACA READY. I would also stress that the car would be a GREAT touring vehiclle. A lot of poeple like a big, comfortable, well equiped car to tour. Probably would have the best luck moving it within the AACA community.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, Iam guessing here. Is your tongue somewhat in your cheek with this post?;) Can't even figure out how you typed a post about a post-war car. Did it give you hives?:D If you are seriously trying to sell it you know more than most guys how to do that!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simply indicate that the car was once owned by J.B. Wilson lll, second cousin to someone somehow related to Katherine Hepburn (she was a resident of CT, after all), and she rode in it once, although the documentation is spotty, no doubt you can promise that it is true. So the car has celeberty ties, automatically quadrupling it's value.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
While some are poking fun at an '85 Crown Vic, as a "modern antique" it sounds like a great tour car or a good "first car" car for someone to enter the antique car hobby and enjoy the fun. Not everyone can own an Auburn/Cord/Duesenberg. I hope it finds a good home.

I agree. While a 1985 Crown Vic is of no interest to me, I get tired of the attitude that anything from the 1970's or later is just "used junk". I saw a 1978 Chevy Nova 4 door in a boring tan with tan plaid seats and straight 6 at a car show one time. I thought who would bring such a boring crappy car to a car show? A while later a saw a kid that barely looked old enough to drive proudly polishing and detailing it with a whole bucket full of supplies. I felt like a complete jerk after seeing how happy and proud he was of it. Even though I never said anything out loud about it.

A 1985 Crown Vic is indeed AACA show ready at 25 years old. Remember even a Duesenberg was "used junk" at one time. I see no need to make fun of a car that might make someone happy and get them into the hobby, even if it is not to your personal taste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a friend of mine that has a plain jane pea green metallic Pontiac Tempest that belonged to his grandmother. He is so proud of that car and he takes it to car shows to be part of the experience. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a friend of mine that has a plain jane Pontiac Tempest that belonged to his grandmother. He is so proud of that car and he takes it to car shows to be part of the experience.

Pretty much the same story with the car that took center stage in the painting for the 2010 Hershey Meet poster.

The car in the center belongs to a mutual friend of West's and mine, William M. (Bill) Davis of Charleston, W. Va. It was his mother's car which he had restored. As a matter of fact, three of the cars on that poster belong to Bill.

They sit among his collection of Rolls Royces and Bentleys in the building where he keeps them. There is also a Corvair there that he fell in love with and bought by knocking on the owner's door and offering to buy it. :)

Even an ugly puppy needs a loving home. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, you have to be careful about what you say about a car at a show, and to who. Hershey once, on the flea market field, and a few rows back had seen a little Maxwell. large group of guys standing there, my buddy and I walk up. One of the guys starts talking to me, and asks what I'm working on. "Oh, just a little Model 20 Hupmobile, cute car, not lots of power, but a lot better than that p**s-f**t Maxwell that's sitting over there. Eyes wide, he stares at me. "You mean MY p**s-f**t Maxwell???" Oops.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this