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R.I.P Cars and Parts


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I have been a subscriber to Cars and Parts magazine since the 1970's. When I heard that they were combining several marqe magazines plus C&P and calling it Auto Entusiast, I was pretty skeptical. Yesterday, I received the premier issue and I have to tell you, It sucks beyond my wildest imagination.

This is nothing more than a catalog for speed equipment plus a few feature articles on 70's muscle cars. The one "classic" article featured a 1941 Graham that appeared to be modified, but didn't give enough information to tell me what I wanted to know.

Am I the only one that likes to see nice original cars the way they are supposed to look? Are cars only about horsepower and speed? Did everyone drive modified and muscle cars back in the day? Are all of the good automotive journalists retired or dead? Does anyone remember how to read?

The one change for the better is the AACA magazine. There has been such a tremendous improvement over the past few years. The stories of member cars and what it took to bring them back are truly inspirational. Articles about original cars are great also. While attending the 2010 Hershey meet, I spent a lot of time looking at cars in the HPOF class and realized that "They are still out there."

Another thing that frosts my onions is the misuse of the word "Restored". Take a look at some of the cars offered for sale on E-Bay and you'll see what I mean. I sent a message to one seller and told him that the next time he was near a dictionary, have someone look up the meaning of the word for him.

Thanks for letting me blow off some steam and to the guys and gals that put our magazine together, keep up the good work and you'll have me for life!

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Absolutely agree, the loss of Cars and Parts is a shame, it was a very high quality magazine with lots of old car information. The new version, with sections for Corvette/Mopar/Muscle/Classis is awful, it's trying to do everything for everybody and will end up doing nothing for anybody. Whoever thought that this would be a good solution to merge magazines made a huge mistake......

I surely won't be renewing, and I think that the publishing company has ripped off everyone who recently subscribed or renewed to ANY of the magazines.........

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Got my copy of the Amos Auto Enthusiast (I think that's the name of it) magazine yesterday; to be honest, didn't have the time (er, nerve, heart, other body part...!!) to open it up, and it's still in its plastic wrap. Probably because my subconsious me already told me what the preceding posts seem to already indicate.

Yes, I'll eventually "give it a chance", to be fair, as far as looking at the issue, and hoping against hope that I'll be proven wrong (To note, this must be a complimentary issue, as I actually let me subscription to Cars and Parts lapse, and didn't renew once I found out about it's unfortunate demise). But, just judging by the cover, AAE looked like the typical Chevy/Ford/Mopar cookie-cutter car mag, with an oh-by-the-way obligatory sop to a classic, in this case, the '41 Graham.

Just on the surface, it struck me that it looks like it's trying to be all things to all people, based upon the cliched focus-group/marketing view that you've gotta have the Camaro/Mustang/Hemi (yawn, just like every other car magazine I see on the rack) articles, or else. Kinda like watching Barrett-Jackson, you know? How many 427/435 hp '67 Corvettes does one have to suffer through to see something you don't see everyday at every car show or cruise-in, like a '58 DeSoto Shopper wagon? Where's the fast-forward button on my DVR?!?!

On the other hand, I did receive the latest Collectible Automobile magazine today with a super article on the '65-'66 full-size (not Cutlass/442) Oldsmobiles, complete with black-and-white pictures of the Oldsmobile styling department's clay model renderings of what would eventually become the '65 Starfire, with those shots dating back to the summer of 1962. Add to that the historical perspective and insight typically found in each CA article, and all I can say is "Wow, THAT is a magazine!!"

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I forced myself to read the few articles which I thought could be of interest -- I really tried to stay positive -- I had subscribed to "CARS and PARTS" since about 1976.

This new Amos Auto Enthusiast publication is GLOSSY DRIVEL -- PABLUM for the WANNA-BE, in my humble opinion, of course. It does not serve my interests.

Can I get a refund instead of replacement issues? Please?

Pretty Please?

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I subscribed to Mopar and Musclecar Enthusiast magazines and after flipping through the new issue, even I wasn't impressed!! I agree with Marty............can I get a refund?...I have almost a year left of both subcriptions. Unless they change something, I'm not looking forward to the next issue, which was something I always did!

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Am I the only one that likes to see nice original cars the way they are supposed to look? Are cars only about horsepower and speed? Did everyone drive modified and muscle cars back in the day? Are all of the good automotive journalists retired or dead? Does anyone remember how to read?

Hello Jrope, you are not alone, I completely echo your comments here.

BUT those of us here of that mindset are apparently a less attractive audience than those who enjoy the Camaro/Mustang/Hemi focus-group as labeled by starfireelvis. I guess magazines are like the new car market--research indicates what sells so everything looks alike now.

I hate that Cars & Parts has been killed off and the new magazine is apparently just a mash-up of content to fulfill current subscriptions. It is no good for me, I am glad I did not pay for a subscription previously.

But I agree with starfireelvis that Collectable Automobile remains outstanding and this month's issue may be one of the best ever. It is pricy enough that I have considered letting my subscription lapse, but I think I will keep it coming with the thought that it is worth the extra bucks. Todd C

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I admit I have not read either mag in a while, but I do remember Cars & Parts mag as a really good source of info.

I am however very heavily involved in advertising in many automotive mags. I am the Multi Media Manager/Ad Director for Bill Mitchell's World Products. Mostly racing mags, but my stuff is in Mopar Restoration, Engine Builder and others.

In the ad biz. Money talks. Those "wanna bes" buy things for there Mustangs, Vettes, Muscle cars and such. There are also tons of businesses that want to advertise to them. Collectors read & collect things. I dont see as much of an advertising market for antiques as there is for the more popular newer cars... and this is what I do for a living, BTW.

But perhaps, that isnt the main point, the main point is the economy. Magazines that cater to rich people that can afford a 34 Packard, 57 Chevy or Model T and restore them are not in the majority. And I hate to tell you, that if you can afford anything like that... you are rich.

Neither is descretionary spending very popular nowadays. Everyone is hurting, including the media. You guys should be lucky that they even are publishing anything at all.

It is a new world fellas, a new century and the wheels of progress will turn and sometimes runs us over. Run with the pack or get left behind.

Never mind the impact that the Internet has had on publishing. Why spend thousands upon thousands of bucks to print and mail a full color multi page mag, when they can simply post it online, and again get more advertisers?

RIP Cars & Parts and all the other good mags that have left us/

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In the ad biz. Money talks. Those "wanna bes" buy things for there Mustangs, Vettes, Muscle cars and such. There are also tons of businesses that want to advertise to them. Collectors read & collect things. I dont see as much of an advertising market for antiques as there is for the more popular newer cars... and this is what I do for a living, BTW.

Never mind the impact that the Internet has had on publishing. Why spend thousands upon thousands of bucks to print and mail a full color multi page mag, when they can simply post it online, and again get more advertisers?

I was about to speculate that the "wannabes" can be pursuaded to part with discretionary money easier than the more mature enthusiast, this statement is not a surprise to me. Not as surprising as learning doubleM thinks a guy with a Model T or 57 Chevy is richer than a Corvette or muscle car guy! :)

Actually, that may be why Collectable Automobile remains so good, their profits must be more keyed to the high subscription prices than the (few) ads. Skinned Knuckles probably is too.

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I would strongly suggest that you get in touch with the editors of this "new" magazine. If they hear enough complaints, maybe, just maybe they will listen. I myself am not familiar with these magazines (I'm new to the hobby), but I can tell you by what opinions I have read here, that I will NOT be buying their magazines.

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Jrope,

I wrote the lonely, 1941 Graham Hollywood article you saw at the end of "Auto Enthusiast". I am sorry that the article caused you confusion. Many paragraphs of the original article were omitted from the print version, as were the photo captions. I don't know why. I always strived to be clear, accurate, and entertaining in my feature writing for "Cars & Parts". Perhaps the strange context of the article is to blame.

To my knowledge, the Graham pictured represents a sincere effort at an authentic restoration, and is not a "ModStock," an automotive deformity I deplore. If the Graham is flawed in some fashion, please let me know. Automotive history is, after all, a learning process, and the Hollywood is an especially esoteric vehicle.

As to the bigger issue of the death of "Cars & Parts" and what cars constitute content, readers who want to see more articles about antique, collector, and Classic cars MUST write to editors. I think that you are the silent majority.

I believe that a 1930 Chrysler Model 77 roadster I wrote about for the December issue of "Cars & Parts" will appear in the January '11 "Auto Enthusiast".

Thanks,

Dave Duricy

ex Associate Editor "Cars & Parts"

AKA

The Chryslerist

Edited by daveduricy (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

first off,sorry Marty,but there are no refunds on your C&P sub.

I just recently renewed for 3 years when they dropped this "bomb".

If you go to Amos Advantage you can credit your remaining sub time to one of their publications/books.

Second,As far as "rich" people are the only ones that read antique mags,I beg to differ.

You can buy 3 to 4 nice "T's" for the price of one new charger.

You can buy some pretty nice late 40's early 50's Mopar "drivers" for under $10,000.

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Am I the only one that likes to see nice original cars the way they are supposed to look? Are cars only about horsepower and speed? !

No, you are not the only one that feels that way. When I go to a large car show the first thing I do is inquire where the oldest vehicles at the show are located. Then I start looking and taking photos there and work on up to the newer vehicles. If there is a possibility I will not see everything there (and it happens often) I want to be sure to see the historical vehicles. It pains me greatly to see rare cars streetrodded. As for C&P, after subscribing to it for about 30 years I began to see it as a little bit of coverage of newer cars and lots of advertising and decided it was something I no longer needed in my life. I would rather spend my money on margue histories, my AACA and ATHS memberships, and Hemmings Classic Cars, even though the cars in it do not fit the definition I accept of what a classic car is.

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You can buy 3 to 4 nice "T's" for the price of one new charger.

You can buy some pretty nice late 40's early 50's Mopar "drivers" for under $10,000.

If you can afford a new Charger, you are rich.

That "under 10,000 dollar driver" better be a daily driver, otherwise your...

rich enough to have a second car.

Welcome to the Great Reccesion.

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I stumbled into this thread this morning and would like to comment.

First, my name is Rich Truesdell and I was a long-time contributor to Cars & Parts as well as the editor of Chevy Enthusiast. While the closure of Chevy Enthusiast didn't exactly catch me by surprise, that Cars & Parts would shut down at the same time, along with the other five titles, did. As I contributed to all the six titles, plus serving as editor of Chevy Enthusiast, this hit me hard, very hard.

As an "insider" I can tell you that the magazine business is undergoing a seismic shift as many titles have closed or consolidated over the course of this extended economic downturn – in all categories – as both advertising revenues and circulation have declined. While many of you rail about the number of advertisements in your favorite magazines, to be quite honest with you, many more magazines would have already failed had it not been for this revenue stream. The alternative would be the $10 cover price for magazines like Collectible Automobile, a magazine that I love as I have a complete set going back to its very first issue. But their circulation is small, even compared to Cars & Parts or Hemmings Classic Car, as they are serving a small and very defined niche.

To give you an idea of just how serious things are in the magazine business, I would like to point out this example. Just over a year ago the publisher Conde Nast (Vogue, GQ, Conde Nast Traveler, Bon Appétit, and others) shut down Gourmet magazine along with two other titles. At the time Gourmet had paid circulation of over 900,000 and had been published for almost 70 years. You would think that with that legacy and that many subscribers that they would be profitable, but in reality, they weren't and in much the same way that Cars & Parts has been folded in to Auto Enthusiast, Gourmet's subscribers were sent Bon Appétit in its place.

While there was a lot of hand wringing and outcry over the demise of Gourmet, a year later, not much is said of the decision... life goes on. You have to realize that magazines are a discretionary purchase and in tough times, people let subscriptions lapse or stop buying single copies at their nearby Barnes & Noble or at the local supermarket.

But in the time since Gourmet's shut down, there's been one more fundamental shift in the magazine picture, the iPad. This will accelerate the shut down and consolidation of more magazines. But the iPad, and the similar, less expensive tablets that are coming will give rise to online-only, digital magazines that will fill the void.

In a report published yesterday in Barron's Online, their editors cited a report from Citigroup's team of analysts covering computers, software and semiconductors saying there will be 35 million tablet computers sold in 2011, with Apple's iPad accounting for three quarters of the total, compared with almost 400 million PCs sold. But that may be a conservative estimate with another report saying that 40 million tablets will be sold by Apple next year and 30 million by the rest of the pack, 70 million in total. I think the real number will be somewhere in between and this will have a major impact on traditional ink-on-paper magazines.

Why am I telling you all of this? It's simple. Expect to get more and more of your content from online sources, be they forums like this or this online-only magazines coming out aimed for this new breed of tablets like the iPad. With a price starting at $500, and with less real functionality than a $300 netbook, the iPad isn't for everyone but when a similar device is available for $199 next Christmas, won't you consider buying one for yourself?

CoverVol2issue1.jpg

As for me, I'm making the transition to a digital future as already I produce a monthly, online-only magazine called Automotive Traveler. I hope that you'll take a look and think about the possibilities. Imagine a magazine with the classics-focused content of Cars & Parts, delivered to your in-box every month? What would you be will willing to pay for a content package edited and vetted with the same care and effort found in Cars & Parts?

Would you be will willing to pay 99 cents and issue, two dollars an issue, or as much as five dollars an issue, the price of Cars & Parts? Or would you expect it to be free, like this forum? If it's the latter, who would cover the costs of production (the writers, photographers, graphic designers, and editors who all need to make a living)? In reality, to produce a monthly classic car publication in the same format as Automotive Traveler costs almost the same as a print publication. Only the cost of print is eliminated along with its attendant costs to subscribers (postage) and to news stands (traditional two-step wholesale distribution and rack cost).

(Did you know that of every 100 copies of your favorite magazine distributed to news stands, 70 end up in a landfill? This is inefficient and certainly not sound from the standpoint of the environment, another issue to consider.)

Getting back to Automotive Traveler for just one moment, after taking a look, I hope that more than a few of you will want to make contributions. As I know many of you drive your classics, maybe you would like to share some of your more memorable road trips? This is especially true if you took photos along the way.

This is what Automotive Traveler is all about, great cars, roads, people, and destinations. In our most recently published issue I reworked a feature I wrote and photographed five years ago for the original Motor Trend Classic, four muscle cars on Route 66. And while I think the editors of Motor Trend Classic did a great job with its original eight page presentation, I really believe that the 15-page presentation in Automotive Traveler surpasses it. And please, leave comments as we're just finishing up the next issue and want to incorporate as many suggestions as possible.

As for Auto Enthusiast, I think that you should give it a chance. See how things evolve over the first six issues, before, as is the cliché, you “throw the baby out with the bathwater.” As far as I can tell, the decision to consolidate the titles was made quickly and the editor should be given the opportunity to satisfy the readers of the consolidated titles. That will take time.

There will be a feature in the classics section on a 1957 Oldsmobile in an upcoming issue that I photographed for Cars & Parts which Jon G. Robinson contributed the text. I believe it's the kind of feature you would have expected to find in Cars & Parts.

As Bob Dylan once wrote, The Times They Are A-Changin' and nowhere is this truer than in the business of automotive magazines.

Thanks for reading,

Richard Truesdell

Former Contributing Editor, Cars & Parts and Musclecar Enthusiast

Former Editor, Chevy Enthusiast

Founder and Editorial Director, Automotive Traveler Magazine, automotivetraveler.com

Edited by autotraveler (see edit history)
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I was just looking over another thread here, about the prices in the secondary market, of the Krause Standard Catalog of American Cars, 1946-75. This is a reference book that should be on the bookshelf of any enthusiast. I have not only this book, but more than a half dozen others, on trucks, 4X4s, and some of the individual marques editions like Jon G. Robinson's excellent book on Chevys of the fifties. While I typically find mistakes in all of the Standard Catalog series, especially on AMCs and independents, which some of you know is my area of specialization from my contributions to Cars & Parts (my own 1964 Rambler American 440 convertible was the cover car for the August 2008 issue) it pales in comparison to the wealth of information and statistics assembled by the various editors, especially John Gunnell.

The question that I would like to ask here is if books like the Standard Guide series were made available for the iPad (or other tablets) or the new Nook Color (or other E-readers like the Amazon Kindle) what percentage of the price of the full print edition would you be willing to pay? For instance, a new edition of the Standard Catalog of American Cars, 1946-75 is available in limited numbers from Krause direct for $75, what would you be willing to pay for an electronic edition? For a version on CD/DVD-ROM if you don't have an e-reader?

This is important as publishers are no longer willing to shoulder the risk for printing books for which there is unsure demand in much the same way that they are not willing to publish niche magazines, and in some cases, like Gourmet that I cited earlier, mainstream titles with large paying circulations. If they can't make a sound (read profitable) business case, they won't do it. It's that simple. Electronic publishing gives some a viable alternative. Will people here adopt the alternative?

I'm hoping that members here will share their thoughts. I tend to believe the older the reader, the less likely that they will embrace an electronic or digital substitute. And I think that it's a safe generalization to say that participants in this particular forum are "more mature" than a typical Internet user, especially one seeking information or content on classic or vintage automobiles.

Richard Truesdell

Former Contributing Editor, Cars & Parts and Musclecar Enthusiast

Former Editor, Chevy Enthusiast

Founder and Editorial Director, Automotive Traveler Magazine, automotivetraveler.com

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I'm pretty new to the e-reader market. My family has a Kindle and a Literati (which can "borrow" books from the library). However I can see one issue already.

The problem with an e-reader version of a Standard Catalog type book is that those types of books are bought with the intention of being used as a reference for decades. I still have a few dozen car books I bought in the 1970s when I literally was living off of student loans and generic mac & cheese dinners. I doubt I'm unique in that aspect, which is one of the big reasons why old copies of the first Standard Catalog books are so expensive and hard to come by.

Which leads to this...How many electronic devices do you still have from 1977 that are still fully functional? I keep a cd of everything I put on my i-pod for the very reason that my answer to that question is zero.

If there is an available physical backup of some sort that will be accessible and practical for a near infinite period (i.e. a reloadable cd-rom, which with great care may last decades), then this kind of publishing of reference materials might work. Otherwise I think that most people would spring for the paper copies no matter how tech-savvy they are.

Now for a leisure reading biography or lightweight profile book, the e-book market may be a much bigger boon. They're more of a one-and-done proposition for the reader.

Edited by Dave@Moon (see edit history)
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Dave,

You bring up an interesting point, one that I don't think is properly addressed by the current generation of e-readers. It's something that I'm going to look into further, how one's purchases are archived (by amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders) and how these purchases can be uploaded to new devices. The pace of innovation in the consumer electronics moves at lightning speed.

As soon as I find out something definitive I will let you and the group know what I find.

Richard Truesdell

Former Contributing Editor, Cars & Parts and Musclecar Enthusiast

Former Editor, Chevy Enthusiast

Founder and Editorial Director, Automotive Traveler Magazine, automotivetraveler.com

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The problem with an e-reader version of a Standard Catalog type book is that those types of books are bought with the intention of being used as a reference for decades.

I agree on that Dave. I am as computer literate as most people but when it comes to a large reference work like that it is still easier to walk over to the shelf and flip to the needed page rather than search the computer. Using actual books as reference still has some efficiency, even in the modern world.

Second, hello to Angelo Van Bogart from Old Cars Weekly from a long time subscriber! Hope to see you around here often, Todd C

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Dave and Todd,

In some ways I tend to agree with you but am looking at this from a different perspective. First, is if the book is in an e-reader format or converted to an online edition (accessible if you've purchased a registered copy) is the ability to search it digitally.

Second, when I travel on assignments, now checking no bags, it's not possible to pack my copy. Having it available, either on an e-reader like the B&N Nook Color or online in a format similar to what we are using for Automotive Traveler, would be so good.

I'm thinking that with the new generation of tablets coming, I see a time where I might not be traveling with a laptop. That would be a huge plus for me.

Best,

Richard Truesdell

Former Contributing Editor, Cars & Parts and Musclecar Enthusiast

Former Editor, Chevy Enthusiast

Founder and Editorial Director, Automotive Traveler Magazine, automotivetraveler.com

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I consider myself an amateur automotive historian and have subscribed to most all of the antique auto publications over the years. I have gotten "Old Cars" most of the time since 1974. I have to say that I have been enjoying the magazine more since you have been including indivdual stories about reader's cars. I had a dear friend that once told me that "Every car has a story". Based on that statement, you should never run out of material.

I personally have a 1965 all original Pontiac Catalina convertible that I got from the original owner, another good friend, that has a story that I am not quite ready to tell, at least not in a national publication. OCW and the Antique Automobile provides me with stories that entertain me when I want it- While having lunch, taking a break, relaxing, or whenever. I guess that my point is that I enjoy mags like this without getting a whole lot of hi-tech gadgets involved. What I consider rest and relaxation at it's best.

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Jrope,

Are you referring to Old Cars or Cars & Parts? I contributed to Cars & Parts but Brad Bowling, an absolutely astounding editor, edited both in his career and was Cars & Parts' final editor.

Would love to hear the story behind your Pontiac, feel free to PM or E-mail me off list.

Richard Truesdell

Former Contributing Editor, Cars & Parts and Musclecar Enthusiast

Former Editor, Chevy Enthusiast

Founder and Editorial Director, Automotive Traveler Magazine, automotivetraveler.com

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I am a longtime C&P subscriber and just finished Auto Enthusiast and like many will not be renewing. C&P will be missed.

For me personally, I work on a computer 10 hours a day and reading a magazine online or via e-reader is the last thing I want to do when I get home. I prefer to sit my a$$ in my favorite chair with my favorite car magazine and zone out from the computer world.

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Just got a renewal notice for the new mag. They are offering one year for 19.99. For that price I think I will give them a year and see what becomes of the new mag. Maybe they will listen and refine it some.

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For me personally, I work on a computer 10 hours a day and reading a magazine online or via e-reader is the last thing I want to do when I get home. I prefer to sit my a$$ in my favorite chair with my favorite car magazine and zone out from the computer world.

You said it Ron, I agree

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  • 3 years later...

Just stumbled onto this thread when I went looking for information about the old Cars & Parts magazine. So sad to hear what happened to such a great magazine. I have a collection of old issues that I would like to unload if anyone is interested in them. January 1978 through February 1992. I believe I have them all, but there might be missing an issue or two. Does fifty bucks sound fair? I wouldn't dream of trying to ship them, but I could deliver them to any Carlisle or Hershey flea market. Anyone interested?

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Rich, thanks for your comments, Cars and Parts just became another hot rod rag. I received mine on Saturday and it out in the recycling bin for tomorrow's garbage. I had been a subscriber since the early 70's. When it merged into some other waste of paper a few years ago (I forgot the name but is was some combination of 3 or 4 magazines) there was still some content (not much) worth my time. Not seeing Cars and Parts that month when the change over went down I mailed another check, thinking I forgot to renew so I got stuck with a double subscription of something I did not want. When I saw the Cars and Parts name was being used again, and a great tribute to Bob Stevens I felt there was hope. The magazine just bacame another hot rod rag, without the girls so there is no reason to look at it, even for the pictures. I am not in that business at all but I do have a good understanding of demographics, advertisers, and subscribers in the magazine business. I did consider contacting them, but for some reason I don't think they are concerend what I or others like me feel I wish them luck on trying to fit into a market that is already has a lot of competition. It was not for me a year ago, but it is really not for me now.

For what it is worth, you can keep your "e-readers" and all of that stuff. If I can't take it to the throne I don't need it!

Edited by Biscayne John (see edit history)
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  • 2 years later...

==============================================

 

This is a revival of an old thread after 6 years to ask:

 

DOES "CARS AND PARTS" MAGAZINE STILL EXIST?

 

I know it was discontinued--replaced by "Auto Enthusiast"--

which members of this forum pretty much disdained--and then

it was revived after a few years.

 

Searching the internet for Cars and Parts magazine, I found

their website, www.carsandparts.com, which was vacant and said,

 

"The all new Cars & Parts is under construction and will be relaunched soon.

Until that time, please visit our sister website Power and Performance News

for the Latest Cars & Parts content."

 

Has this venerable magazine, once excellent, declined or failed again?

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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OK, I was just about to walk away from the computer and go get some work done. But the challenge for "older readers" to comment got me going. I Started my magazine reading with Hot Rod back in the day when all the car-feature pages were in shades of green.. Yep, back in the 50's. Over the years, I have subscribed to so MANY magazines, I cant count them any more. Over the past recent few years I have found that some of the magazines sit on my desk and pile up until I can see over the stack. So I have been dropping subscriptions pretty regularly.

I find myself on internet forums where I can participate and in some cases be a bit of help to other hobbyists. I don't need to see one more dyno test of a chevy small block build or another "how to rebuild your Delco generator". Even with my reduction in printed publications I look around my TWO desks and my drafting table and do not see an open space. In my recycle bin are several bits of advertising that fell out of the last magazine I opened. I am tired of the waste of paper and cost of all this STUFF.

I am done with it all. If I need help or want to share what knowledge I have, I will do it here online in the proper forum. However, now I find myself caught up in the online world and when I do, I am NOT productive in my shop working on my cars or those of others that expect to see their restoration project actually leave my shop. So there fore, I have GOT to reduce the magazines and limit myself to the online stuff too!

 

OK--- There ya have it--- another opinion-- I gotta get back to work    

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Interesting this should surface again just as I was going though some boxes of "stuff" and found a pile of C&P magazines.  I was an early subscriber, and even while the Navy had me away on official business I enjoyed it.  There were a few times I was away from the family for extended periods of time and I always enjoyed those care packages from home, that included the issues I'd missed.  Susan had carefully gone through them and circled ads for Model A parts I might be interested in.  It works much faster with the net now days so Ovalrace25's point is well taken.  Still, I've spent a couple of hours reading once again and enjoying all the memories.   I recall one time that my magazines began arriving a week or two later than normal, and a complaint to the post office had no result - that is until I got an issue late and found that someone at the post office had written notes in the margin.  Apparently they had called about a Model T for sale and were negotiating the price.  So, it was nice to figure out what had been holding up delivery of my magazines, and the post master was quite upset with his crew who had obviously been reading my magazines on their lunch-breaks.  Fingerprints in ketchup helped nail the culprit.

Terry

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On ‎11‎/‎24‎/‎2010 at 10:32 AM, john2dameron said:

No, you are not the only one that feels that way. ...... Hemmings Classic Cars, even though the cars in it do not fit the definition I accept of what a classic car is.

 

May I make a respectful suggestion - those of you older folks should open your eyes and recognize you don't own the vocabulary.  You are not going to encourage young people if you tell them what YOU think words SHOULD mean. 

 

The word "classic" isn't yours;  it belongs to all of us.   These days it just means something nice that we like.   Been in a grocery store recently?  

 

You will find  hundreds of items that are classic.  Classic shoe laces, classic potato chips, classic macaroni salad.   I just picked up a copy of that Hemmings car sales magazine.   Hundreds and hundreds of pages.   Hard to find one where stuff isn't "classic".

 

I am going to "pass" on the old "dualie"  I WAS looking at  - cost of SIX of those big tires scared me off.   Looking now - betcha I "take the plunge"  at a well-maintained '91 GMC 2500 Series Suburban.  By the time you guys read this, it will almost certainly be MINE!

 

BOTH the AC and the heater work dandy.  (has TWO air conditioners - one in front, one in back. STOCK !     You honestly want to tell us you think it would be more pleasant to go driving around in one of those old 1940's cars than in my new  "classic" ?

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