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55 Century 66R Project


Mudbone
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Trying to figure out how to reach the center of the roof. I think jack stands and a section of scaffolding will work perfect. It is very stable. I jumped around on it and it never moved. This will be a good test for my carpel tunnel surgery! I need to deep clean the garage and put up some new plastic. Hopefully I can shoot it next week.
 

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Ha ha. I don't know if you can do this in your neighborhood but I suggest prepping it outside and starting painting there, one hour before the bugs come out. Helps if there is a light breeze that day and you can position it in some shade.  

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1 hour ago, JohnD1956 said:

Ha ha. I don't know if you can do this in your neighborhood but I suggest prepping it outside and starting painting there, one hour before the bugs come out. Helps if there is a light breeze that day and you can position it in some shade.  

 

I thought about that. I don’t think I want my new neighbor to know what I am doing in there. All the old neighbors have seen it all and have not complained. The weather is very unpredictable around here, the chance of having good weather next weekend is slim.

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Evil forces are trying to prevent me from painting the roof Saturday. I stopped at the bank to withdraw some cash out of the Buick account to cover the parts and paint I just bought. As I go to leave, the Tahoe is acting strange. I had to give it extra gas to get it to go. After a few blocks. I could smell brake pads! I pulled over and found the right front is smoking. I let it cool down awhile and made it home. I took the HHR up to auto parts and spent another $490.00 on front brakes! How was your afternoon?
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On 4/5/2020 at 11:24 AM, old-tank said:

What paint system are you using?  "Maybe' you could paint outside if using lacquer (but please don't).

 

Illinois weather. Hail storm, next day 75* The next morning 35* with high winds. Tonight having supper High winds with snowflakes, Tomorrow and Saturday ???????

Edited by Mudbone (see edit history)
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@Mudbone Thanks for the great video.  You may want to revisit the part of the video where you walked off the end of the scaffold for America's Funniest Home Videos.   May be 10K to help boost the Buick Build  fund in it.  😁

 

Also, you may have considered this already, but after wet sanding, lay down at least one more coat of clear. and then see how it looks.  And watching the video  it was interested to see just how far the overspray was blowing.  As far as I remember the air pressure for a HLVP gun, like you used, is very minimal.  I want to say 10 lbs of air, but I may be wrong about that.  It's been a while since I ventured down this road and I am just an amateur dabbler in this art too.  And even with 10 lbs there is still some overspray.  May I ask, what pressure did you use?

 

 

Edited by JohnD1956 (see edit history)
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Looks great, Mud!  Don't sweat the orange peel.  It is never going to lay completely flat. 

 

For wet sanding, start with 1000 grit wrapped around a Durablock like the one in the photo I am attaching (using a block like this eliminates those "ripples" created when using your bare hands).  Then move to 2000.  Use your palm for the curved areas.  If you want to go further, it just makes buffing easier.  Depending on your buffing method, other grits may be used.  But 3000 is as far as I go, on a DA hook and loop disc.  I use a rotary buffer.  I do see a lot of people moving to orbital buffers, but you basically have to go all the way to 5000 or 8000 grit on those.

 

3 good coats of clear should give you plenty of material to take off to completely eliminate the orange peel and any dust that got in.

 

 

durablock.jpg

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45 minutes ago, JohnD1956 said:

@Mudbone Thanks for the great video.  You may want to revisit the part of the video where you walked off the end of the scaffold for America's Funniest Home Videos.   May be 10K to help boost the Buick Build  fund in it.  😁

 

Also, you may have considered this already, but after wet sanding, lay down at least one more coat of clear. and then see how it looks.  And watching the video  it was interested to see just how far the overspray was blowing.  As far as I remember the air pressure for a HLVP gun, like you used, is very minimal.  I want to say 10 lbs of air, but I may be wrong about that.  It's been a while since I ventured down this road and I am just an amateur dabbler in this art too.  And even with 10 lbs there is still some overspray.  May I ask, what pressure did you use?

 

 

 

I am not a big fan of HVLP because I have not been able to get the results as with my old conventional gun. I did everything by the book. The base coat and clear coat calls for 8-10 psi at the cap and 29-40 at the gun. I was running 25 psi at the gun. If I had to do it over I would have used a slower thinner on the base coat and a slower drying clear coat. (I have a lot of blocking to do)

My best paint job ever was on my dad’s 26 Model T. Acrylic enamel with Wet Look hardener. Two coats, no runs and very little orange peel, DONE.

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11 minutes ago, Smartin said:

Looks great, Mud!  Don't sweat the orange peel.  It is never going to lay completely flat. 

 

For wet sanding, start with 1000 grit wrapped around a Durablock like the one in the photo I am attaching (using a block like this eliminates those "ripples" created when using your bare hands).  Then move to 2000.  Use your palm for the curved areas.  If you want to go further, it just makes buffing easier.  Depending on your buffing method, other grits may be used.  But 3000 is as far as I go, on a DA hook and loop disc.  I use a rotary buffer.  I do see a lot of people moving to orbital buffers, but you basically have to go all the way to 5000 or 8000 grit on those.

 

3 good coats of clear should give you plenty of material to take off to completely eliminate the orange peel and any dust that got in.

 

 

durablock.jpg

IMG_0440.jpg

IMG_0445.jpg

 

 

Thanks!

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Orange peel you can deal with.  Don't get cheap on the sand paper...always use new sharp paper with little pressure to knock off the tops of the orange peel ( I start with 600-1000, then go at right angles with  a finer grit to get all of the valleys).  If you lay the clear on too thick with slow gun passes you will end up with what is called 'urethane wave' which is hard to fix (strip again or use a long board to get it flat again).

1 hour ago, Mudbone said:

My best paint job ever was on my dad’s 26 Model T. Acrylic enamel with Wet Look hardener. Two coats, no runs and very little orange peel, DONE.

That's what always happens.  My last project was painting 4 rims (where it did not matter) with non hardened acrylic enamel with cheap touch up gun...perfection.

Edited by old-tank (see edit history)
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I went over the roof again with 1500, 2000, and then 3000. I decide to buff a small area to see what it looks like. I am glad I did. Only after buffing the small imperfections showed up. Several small sanding scratches where I dabbed some clear on. I was able to remove those fairly quickly with 2000 paper and rebuff. I am waiting for a wool pad I ordered and the compound that was recommended. So next week maybe I can get serious about it.

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I've started using Adam's Polishes.  They really seem to work well.  I had never heard of them until I bought a small random orbit buffer to do some detail buffing after wet sanding on my 51 Dodge Roadster.  It came with an Adam's Polish.  I had been using Presta and Meguiars products with my big Dewalt Buffer but it makes a huge mess.  I think it outperforms them.  I have actually been hand buffing with Mothers mag and aluminum polish (I've used it for years on every finish you can imagine) then finish up with the Adam's with the buffer.  It does an amazing job and the car is base clear urethane in Dark Blue which shows scratches like mad.  I found using just 2000 grit saved alot of unnecessary scratches and leveled the finish in just a little bit longer time than 1500. 

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I buffed the main section of the roof this morning. I went over it two times with rubbing compound with a wool pad, wiped it all down with a microfiber rag and then went over it two times with polishing compound and a foam pad. My wife approved!  

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