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55 Century 66R Project


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A Tefba filter is expensive, but super handy.  Put a stack of lifesaver sized magnets on the stem inside for added effectiveness, and clean it out a few times early on, then at every oil change.

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10 hours ago, Fr. Buick said:

A Tefba filter is expensive, but super handy.  Put a stack of lifesaver sized magnets on the stem inside for added effectiveness, and clean it out a few times early on, then at every oil change.

 

Are you and JohnD1956 pulling my leg? Lets see, boiled out block and heads. New core. Heater cores boiled out and tested. All new hoses. 50/50 mix with distilled water and one pint of water pump lubricant/rust preventer.  Flush and change every few years.

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20 minutes ago, Mudbone said:

 

Are you and JohnD1956 pulling my leg? Lets see, boiled out block and heads. New core. Heater cores boiled out and tested. All new hoses. 50/50 mix with distilled water and one pint of water pump lubricant/rust preventer.  Flush and change every few years.

 

What's a piece of panty hose going to cost you for a few weeks?  If there is nothing to catch it can be tossed.  If you catch something you might save the trouble of pulling the radiator to have it boiled out.  Cheap insurance.  But you are the master at this, so ...

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I'm talking about an old engine, never been rebuilt, with crud in the coolant. 

 

I like the tefba because you don't have to drain anything to service it.  Set it up high on the top hose, so there is nothing to drain, no hose to disconnect, nothing to undo except the screw-cap, and it is as permanent as you want it to be.  Compared to finding good radiator work in my neck of the woods, the cost is not so painful.

 

And in my line of work, if I had panty-hose laying around, I would not be admitting it publicly....

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14 hours ago, Mudbone said:

 

Are you and JohnD1956 pulling my leg? Lets see, boiled out block and heads. New core. Heater cores boiled out and tested. All new hoses. 50/50 mix with distilled water and one pint of water pump lubricant/rust preventer.  Flush and change every few years.

 

 

All bases are covered.  No need for panty hose.  People would talk anyway.  

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On ‎1‎/‎28‎/‎2020 at 9:29 AM, Fr. Buick said:

A Tefba filter is expensive, but super handy.  Put a stack of lifesaver sized magnets on the stem inside for added effectiveness, and clean it out a few times early on, then at every oil change.

Ok, what is a Tefba filter and why would you put magnets in it? And where the heck do you put the panty-hose? I'm confused. Diesel engines used filters and a additive for anti-cavitation.

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21 minutes ago, Mudbone said:

Ok, what is a Tefba filter and why would you put magnets in it? And where the heck do you put the panty-hose? I'm confused. Diesel engines used filters and a additive for anti-cavitation.

The panty hose would cover the inlet to the radiator. The radiator hose then affixed to the inlet and hose clamp secured in the normal manner. When the antifreeze flows through the panty hose it will pick up debris before it flows into the radiator.  This low cost and simple engineering is typically done when the block is flushed.  Your entire system is nothing short of new.  Debris panty hose low cost filtering is not required. 

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, avgwarhawk said:

The panty hose would cover the inlet to the radiator. The radiator hose then affixed to the inlet and hose clamp secured in the normal manner. When the antifreeze flows through the panty hose it will pick up debris before it flows into the radiator.  This low cost and simple engineering is typically done when the block is flushed.  Your entire system is nothing short of new.  Debris panty hose low cost filtering is not required. 

Thanks for the info. Now it makes sense. I probably should have done this on One Bid after flushing.

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I'm a strong advocate for the panty hose, which I've used in the vintage cars AND modern vehicles for 20 years.  Your boiled out block has a gray "coating" in the coolant passages, right?  After 20 or 30 heating and cooling cycles, that begins to come loose, in flecks and chunks, and makes its way to that nice new radiator core.

 

I buy the cheap short ankle-high/calf-high stocking women wear with slacks, about $7 for a box of 20 at Walgreens.  These are coarser--and hardier--than the sheer ends of pantyhose.  Even with a boiled out block, try one in your top tank for 500 miles, then drain off about a gallon of coolant (re-use it), remove the upper hose, pull out the stocking, and inspect for debris.  Then rinse under a faucet and replace.

 

Installation:  Use a screwdriver or ratchet HANDLE or other blunt object to insert the toe (closed end) into the top tank, then fold the selvage (open end) over the outside of the upper neck.  Install upper hose over it, so that all coolant passes through the stocking.  I replace the stocking about every 3 years OR whenever I've run some chemical cleaner through the system.  It will NOT reduce coolant flow but will catch debris smaller than a Gano will catch.

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19 hours ago, Grimy said:

I'm a strong advocate for the panty hose, which I've used in the vintage cars AND modern vehicles for 20 years.  Your boiled out block has a gray "coating" in the coolant passages, right?  After 20 or 30 heating and cooling cycles, that begins to come loose, in flecks and chunks, and makes its way to that nice new radiator core.

 

I buy the cheap short ankle-high/calf-high stocking women wear with slacks, about $7 for a box of 20 at Walgreens.  These are coarser--and hardier--than the sheer ends of pantyhose.  Even with a boiled out block, try one in your top tank for 500 miles, then drain off about a gallon of coolant (re-use it), remove the upper hose, pull out the stocking, and inspect for debris.  Then rinse under a faucet and replace.

 

Installation:  Use a screwdriver or ratchet HANDLE or other blunt object to insert the toe (closed end) into the top tank, then fold the selvage (open end) over the outside of the upper neck.  Install upper hose over it, so that all coolant passes through the stocking.  I replace the stocking about every 3 years OR whenever I've run some chemical cleaner through the system.  It will NOT reduce coolant flow but will catch debris smaller than a Gano will catch.

 

Do you have videos or photos of doing this? I tried searching this in YouTube and now I have to explain the results I got to my wife. (Not good)

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2 minutes ago, Mudbone said:

 

Do you have videos or photos of doing this? I tried searching this in YouTube and now I have to explain the results I got to my wife. (Not good)

Sorry. no photos -- but if your question is serious (I can imagine some interesting but not-family-friendly instructions on how to do it! 🙂 ) , ask away!

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  • 1 month later...

It's funny how something can look really presentable until you refurbish something next to it, then it look s shabby, forcing you to redo it also. I had recently wanted to redo the dash in my '50 Chevy and am now also detailing out other components that I originally had not planned to finish, oh well, one thing leads to another. I'm sure you will have a very sharp car when you are done with it. Keep up the good work.

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Mr Mudd,

 

Did you need to do any repairs to the sheet metal for the under-seat heater assembly or was yours in really good shape?  I am asking because mine will probably need some minor repair.  You have yours looking really nice though and I hope to get mine like that soon.  Thank you.

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36 minutes ago, Kosage Chavis said:

Mr Mudd,

 

Did you need to do any repairs to the sheet metal for the under-seat heater assembly or was yours in really good shape?  I am asking because mine will probably need some minor repair.  You have yours looking really nice though and I hope to get mine like that soon.  Thank you.

My floor pans and heater area were rust free.

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1 hour ago, JohnD1956 said:

@Mudbone  I would be tempted to pack a layer of that caulk into the inside opening around the center  wiper transmission unit.  No one will see it and it would just be insurance against a leak in that area.

I think you are correct. The old piece that came out was square. I can still get some in there. Thanks

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19 hours ago, old-tank said:

It's going to be a lot harder to paint it with all that stuff on the car already.  Ask me how I know or just look at my restoration pages ... I did it wrong too.

 

If things keep shutting down I will have time to do it soon. This is normally my busiest time of year. Bobcat just announced the parts distribution center is temporally shut down and I have only one inspection and radon test in the works.

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20 hours ago, Mudbone said:

 

If things keep shutting down I will have time to do it soon. This is normally my busiest time of year. Bobcat just announced the parts distribution center is temporally shut down and I have only one inspection and radon test in the works.

 

Dover white paint ordered for the roof area!

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Today is Buick Saturday. Within twenty minutes I lost my coffee cup. It took twenty minutes to find it. (It was right where I left it) Then I couldn’t find my new reading glasses so I opened up another pair. After awhile I thought I was developing cataracts, then I realized I didn’t take off the protective covers! I WANT A DO OVER!

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3 minutes ago, Mudbone said:

Today is Buick Saturday. Within twenty minutes I lost my coffee cup. It took twenty minutes to find it. (It was right where I left it) Then I couldn’t find my new reading glasses so I opened up another pair. After awhile I thought I was developing cataracts, then I realized I didn’t take off the protective covers! I WANT A DO OVER!

 

 NAP TIME!

 

  Ben

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