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If you had upto $100,000 dollars available, what single car would you invest in. You would hold this investment for at least 10 years. Age is not an issue, could new or old. Only one car for the investment. Now let's here those gear heads grinding.

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Dan,

I´m a romantic, would never buy a car just for investment! With that amount I'd go for a Facel Vega HK 500, seems to me a perfect blend of US and european technology and styling. And hopefully I'll get my money back after 10 years if needed, and I'd had a great time enyoying it in the meantime. What do you think?

Carl

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Dan,

I´m a romantic, would never buy a car just for investment! With that amount I'd go for a Facel Vega HK 500, seems to me a perfect blend of US and european technology and styling. And hopefully I'll get my money back after 10 years if needed, and I'd had a great time enyoying it in the meantime. What do you think?

Carl

Having a hard time zipping my lip here..........Bob

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No love, no passion, just cold Wall Steet make a buck question right?:mad: I've only bought cars because I liked them, and they had to look good. I'm happy with what I have, no "Dream Cars" in my future. To answer your question I think anything with armor plate and lots of armiment and ammo is the place to spend 100 large. ;)

If you had upto $100,000 dollars available, what single car would you invest in. You would hold this investment for at least 10 years. Age is not an issue, could new or old. Only one car for the investment. Now let's here those gear heads grinding.
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I had a C500 1954 Marmon Herrington flathead Ford ( flathead was made 1 year longer in Canada than the USA) that I eternally regret selling so I would buy another Marmon Herrington and spend the rest on bikes and single malt scotch ( which i would drink)

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If I were making that kind of investment for "financial gain", it would not be in an "antique" or "special interest" car...

Now, if the question were, "if someone gave you $100,000 free and clear to go buy the car of your dreams, what would it be?", well... that's another story... ;)

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I don't think Dan meant anything other than to have some fun with what a good bet for the future could be - this could be a fun thread to choose a car and the reasoning behind it..

I would choose a '34 Packard in the best bodystyle, trim level and condition I could get for $100K (In that order, but minimum condition would be solid #3). Considered the best year for Packard by many, any '34 is a Full Classic, and an ideal combination of roadability yet dead center of the Classic Era with a lot of earlier styling queues. Should be a blue chip investment on top of a great automotive experience.

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$100K Pretty much rules out any model open car in #3 or better, Restorer. Of course an open car is a better investment but I would be fine with a coupe, Club (love that style) or regular sedan. With 1934 Packards I believe in the theory that "a rising tide lifts all boats" - the astronimical prices on V-12 Victorias and such will ensure the closed cars are a solid investment. So with some flexibility in model (bodystyle and series) I would pursue the best example $100K will buy, and it will still buy a lot of closed car in a '34, no?

Using the rules here I think a closed car in nice shape beats an open project in the long run, but I could be wrong, that is the fun of this..

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Frank, Pre Classic era open cars could be a great investment also - with the rise in popularity of brass that "in between" era remains undervalued. Some of the open models are really sporty in comparison to the closed cars of that particular era, tough to argue with your logic.

In thinking about this, a second choice for me would be a closed 39 Packard V-12 - less than 450 overall made, but Hyman has a really nice closed model for $75K, well within Dan's range. Last year for the 12, also a series totally unique from the Jr. cars and really well styled. Gven productuion volumes that could be a model to do very well with, again, affordable only in closed car form. (for now...)

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Of course, the problem with the question is the word "invest," if that word is taken to mean putting your money in some instrument that will guarantee a return. If I had the hundred K to "spend," and willing to shoot the dice on value in 10 years:

Brass: either a Stanley (pre-1912), or the best, highest horsepower (40 or more) car I could buy pre-1915, preferably 6 cylinder (Buick, Kissel, Rambler etc., you can't get into Packards and Pierces for that money)

The bastard years, 1916-1928: a tough one, as 100K will buy you a handful (as in 5) nice touring cars....maybe a twin six Packard if you could find one for that, or a early to mid-twenties Locomobile; the early Locke body Chryslers (28-29) were nice.....

1929-1935: agree with the Packard, 33 or 34, preferably V12, money in the bank, and if money's worthless, you still have a wonderful Classic car....

1935-1941: an open Classic Packard, or a nice closed Cord/open Cord project; these are always popular

1945-1960: '55-'57 General Motors convertible, no question

1960-1970: Shelby's are hard to beat, again, if you can find one in that price range

1970-on: I'm not going there......

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No love, no passion, just cold Wall Steet make a buck question right?:mad: I've only bought cars because I liked them, and they had to look good. I'm happy with what I have, no "Dream Cars" in my future. To answer your question I think anything with armor plate and lots of armiment and ammo is the place to spend 100 large. ;)

Hey Bob, Next car I make money on will be my first so I'm a true collector in that sense! If you can keep a car for x number of years and only lose a little bit of money then I think that's a pretty good investment - at least from an emotional well being perspective.

Ultimately I think you need to buy what you have a passion for and hope for the best. Hopefully you like stuff that will hold it's value. I'm blessed with what I think is fairly good taste I inherited from the old man so I won't be making the mistake of doing a ground up on a 74 Gremlin any time soon.

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Yes, utter X%# might work, for some of the truly unattractive assembled cars made from 1916-1928.

I surely don't mean to offend anyone with cars in that time period, I've owned quite a few, and put many a mile on a 1924 Dodge touring. There were some good, dependable cars built then, and even some great ones. The problem is the old "form follows function" rule. Early on (and I'd say pre-1911) this resulted in some beautiful cars. From 1911 to 1915, practical things like those pesky front doors were added, and cars started losing some of their beauty. From 1916 to 1928, it was simply a matter of getting as many cars produced as possible, and very few manufacturers, if any, had what we'd consider a "styling" department. Engineers would increase the wheelbase to fit a slightly bigger engine, and sometimes the changes they made resulted in a handsome car. Many times, not.

In 1929 all that changed, and styling started becoming important to the mass car market.

Just some thoughts......dc

Edited by Peter J.Heizmann (see edit history)
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First, don't buy a project to put away, but rather buy the best available car that the 100K will buy. With a car already done, or not needing work, you or a subsequent buyer won't have to incur labor and parts at higher prices (which seem always inevitable) in the future years. Second, select a model of a marque that already has something special going for it. An example In retrospect might have been an Auburn Speedster, back when they could be bought very reasonably, or for that matter, an XK 120 Jaguar roadster. they went for under ten thousand in large numbers at a time in the not ancient past. The speedsters are out of sight now, but consider grabbing one of those Jags, they have an outstanding design, were the world's fastest production car when made, and along with MG T's were instrumental in popularizing sports car racing. Many of them have already left the USA and have gone to Europe. 100K may not buy a pristine example for too much longer.

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Peter, I won't write the word bastXXd again, but it's not a bad word and I don't understand the censorship. It has legitimate meanings in regard to some of the things in life, definitions from an online dictionary:

-Something that is of irregular, inferior, or dubious origin.

-Not genuine; spurious: a bastXXd style of architecture.

I used the term correctly. thanks David C.

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There is another way to look at it. If you had the ability, time, and resources to restore a car yourself, and by that I mean provide the actual labor yourself, your best bet might be to buy the most potentially valuable car you could find for $100K, regardless of condition, and invest your time and sweat into restoring it. You likely could still eventually turn a handsome profit on the car, assuming you chalked up your time as "fun".

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1959 Cadillac convertible.

Other cars might have more potential for going up in price, but they are a gamble. The 1959 Cadillac has already an icon for quite some time. The 1950's will always be remembered fondly. 1957 Chevys and 1959 Cadillacs have come to represent that era. I don't really see either going down in popularity or price. I think the Chevy has pretty much hit its high point. The Cadillac might have too, but I'd rather be driving that one for the next ten years.

Edited by LINC400 (see edit history)
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1972-89 Mercedes SL convertible. Possibly the last car built like a "classic" with real chrome, real steel, real V8 etc.

Right now they are fairly common and good ones can be bought cheap. But I expect in time they will go up like every other Mercedes convertible.

With the change, buy a few Porsche 911s. Another iconic car that will become more and more rare and desirable.

In any case buy the best original low mileage example you can find. If it is a rare and desirable model so much the better.

At today's prices you should be able to buy a couple of each in real nice shape. Enjoy them to your heart's content at least on nice weekends and maintain them by the book. You should be able to enjoy them for 10 or 20 years and sell them for way more than you paid. Sort of like buying a Duesenberg in 1951 or a Porsche Speedster in 1970.

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I would have to extend that Packard range to 32-34 not that I have an bias as a 32 Super Coupe Roaster owner. :) 32-34 are all very close in styling. I would shy away from a close car as they have not gone up as much as in relation to the open ones...or does that that mean that they are about to go up. Also an engine rebuild on a close car can is a much bigger percentage of a close car value for a 30s Packard. I found that out the hard way this year. :(

I asked a very similiar question in 2005 on this forum before I bought my 32 Packard. I initially used the word investment, but quickly reworded it to what car would best maintain it value if you were interested in a classic. Never used the word investment with old cars unless you are trying to convince a spouse to buy one.

I think muscle cars may still have room to go up though I think there's a interesting difference betweeen the cars. The open classic such as a 32-34 Packard may be less desired by those with 100K+ in their pockets to spend, but there's a lot less of them. So the demand to drive the price for open Packards may be the same as muscle cars just because there are much smaller number to chase. Personally I rather have a Packard as I rather be one of a few than one of many (Until I try to buy parts:))

And not to sidetrack, but I love the various rare statements about muscle cars at auctions which usually had to do with options including color and radio delete:) With 32-34 Packards (and otehr similiar cars) when you are talking rare, you are talking about absolute numbers of cars and not the combinations of options that make the cars rare.

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Ken agree, a '32-'34 is tough to lose on. No argument you would do better with an open example but I think if you cannot do that (open cars, V-12s in any body style under $100K in a '32-34 Packard is really unlikely unless it is a project, even then you exceed the $100K by doing the work...) then buying the best closed you can is a good bet.

Another example of a fantastic car - Cord L-29, there is a brougham or club sedan in HMN this month, assuming the car is nice, it could be the perfect investment car per Dan's $100k limit. Rare in any bodystyle, stunning looks, Full Classic. Asking price for this example, $89K, so assume $85K buy price, allowing $15K for any mechanical problems (you may need it with the FWD) after the 10 year hold, if you sell, I bet you are smiling.... Same car is unattainable in open version at that price.

Any woodie you can obtain under $100K might be good as well, as they seem to still have a ways to go. If people will pay that for a mass produced 60s car why won't the trend continue on what was once the family hauler then demoted to hauling surf boards or hunting equipment in the woods? They present well and can haul a big family around, and they are very cool...

Did I hear Dan is giving $100K to whoever comes up with the best car??

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT
adding humorous line (see edit history)
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If I had that much money, I would GUT my 1946-built garage, do a complete inside makeover on it that would actually work for me (instead of the jumbled up mess that it is) and finish my two '31 Dodge coupes. I would be very content with that.......until I found a rumble seat coupe. Then I would be happy.....until I found a roadster. Then I would be happy.....those would be my investments.

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It's not a $100,000.00 car yet...originally, it was exactly as you described. It IS matching numbers at least.
Not to get off topic, it's amazing at how many people who would consider that car as junk. Even though it's all there, so many people write off a car as being junk only because it doesn't look good.

$100,000 and imagination, you can get a nice car....

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David,

If you have staying-power with your investment-money, there is a freshly restored, essentially undriven 1920 Kissel Model 6-45 Gold Bug Speedster available right now in the 100K-200K price range, through Hyman Limited. i have seen it. It is Concours quality. It is one of two 1920 Kissel Gold Bug Speedsters that have survived, and only one of 38 from all years (1919-1928) that exist, including my 1923 Bug. If you want an investment, buy an exceedingly rare, driveable, beautiful Gold Bug, Stutz DV Speedster, Flyer, or Sport model open car, even from the B----d years as you call thyem, and you will have years of fun and get more than your money out at the end. Or your estate will.

RON

post-58797-143138351663_thumb.jpg

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Ken agree, a '32-'34 is tough to lose on. No argument you would do better with an open example but I think if you cannot do that (open cars, V-12s in any body style under $100K in a '32-34 Packard is really unlikely unless it is a project, even then you exceed the $100K by doing the work...) then buying the best closed you can is a good bet.

You might be able to get a 32 900 coupe roadster under $100K though it may be tough. Even the 120s open are bring 60-70K and in some cases over 100K. Also the 32 900 is on the CCCA Full Classic list.

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  • 2 years later...

Well I already have the Cord so I'll have to go with my first choice a 1931-1933 Auburn Convertible sedan. I would consider a cabriolet though. There was a really nice green one on ebay for 80,000 or thereabouts so under the 100K mark. Can I have the other 20,000 for a little work on the garage it's going to be stored in or to get a drivetrain for the Cord?

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I think Restorer32 has a very good point... in fact I was having that conversation with one of my long time friends only this week. He's an extremely talented mechanic who has been teaching school for the past 35 years. He's retiring in two or three years and looking to get back into antique cars...(he's had a few but none since his daughters started college. The oldest one just got her PhD so that expense is almost behind him!) I suggested he buy the very best pile of parts available... open, full classic etc or a big brass car, if he could find one. Something that would be nearly valueless to anyone but a person with the talent to do the work it because the professional restoration costs had to vastly exceed the final value... It would be almost the same amount of work to do a car that would be worth 10,000 when it was done as one that might sell for 200,000. It still wouldn't qualify as an "investment" in my mind, but its a lot closer to one than most everything else.

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