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1932 Ford Model B project


Guest Dean_H.

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Guest Madison

If you are restoring a 1932 Ford you definitely need to have a copy of Dave Rehor's book on the correct parts, assembly, and finish of these cars. He is the authority on 32 Fords. His book in two volumes is in great detail with lots of photographs and is available through the Early Ford V8 Club. Jim

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I know a lot about Model A Fords and very little about Model B Fords. That sounds like excellent advice. Very little is as good as a well researched book to help with those little details.

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Guest Dean_H.

Thanks for all the effort guys, I agree with John that it's lame to have only one bolt. But Matt makes a good argument and I now tend to believe it had no second arm. The bolt is 1/2 inch diameter, so it's strong enough to be tightened fairly good. That little after market bracket is probably a good a good deal.

I think Fred has that book Madison. He wasn't able to to find the info we needed, however.

This whole chassis and running gear seems to be way outdated for 1932. I can see why it was the cheapest car on the market. Henry Ford apparently cut every corner.

In the 1950s my Dad made a hot rod out of a '32 Ford roadster. He used '48 Ford running gear. The original '32 V8 served as a weight on the disc behind the old Case tractor. I remember him once commenting that it was a good use for a flathead Ford. Anyway, my point is that I have negative bias on Ford that goes way back. I'll try to focus on the good points, which is no easy task, when a far superior, and masterfully restored Hupp is sharing the same garage. :-)

Better picture of generator

12-10e.jpg

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Good.

If you are trying to assemble everything exactly like original you need to check some books for a lot of the small details. From your last photo, assuming that the Model B engine is assembled the same as the Model A engine, there are some minor hardware issues that you will want to address.

For example, the nut and stud visible near the bottom of the rear of the generator is probably not supposed to be painted engine color. It would have been assembled after the engine block was painted. I think you will find that the stud should be plain steel and the nut and lockwasher would probably be raven finish or painted black as would be the bolt heads visible on front of the engine, near the bottom of the front of the generator.

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Guest Dean_H.

Yeah, I suppose you are right. That bolt holds the front main bearing. We didn't have it off because the engine had been rebuilt. I'm not trying to get it perfect, but it'd be nice to stay as close to original as practical. We have a few pictures to look at for reference, but it's difficult to see some details and we're not even sure if they are correct. Fred wants to drive the car around town and of course have it look nice to his friends. Because of time constraints, I'm not too interested in doing a concourse restoration either, so small details will probably be overlooked.

The fuel tank can be mounted on the underside of the top rail as opposed to the way I put it on top. I would like to get that right, but can't seem to find any pictures.

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Not trying to be critical, your skills are impressive.

One suggestion from experience would be that a lot of small sins can be covered through the use of a little masking tape and a little bit of touch up black paint. At least on Model A Fords, when in doubt, it is probably going to be black. If the books show a different finish on small parts, you can substitute another color for the black touch up paint. Aluminum paint is a pretty good substiture for cadmium plating.

Sorry but I have no clue on your fuel tank question.

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Guest Dean_H.

Matt, I appreciate your input, I need all the help I can get on this adventure.

Fred also said there was no second arm on the generator, but I figured it may have been removed before he got the car. I've never seen anything like that, and I've worked on lots of junk. If it did the job in the old days, I guess it should work now. Glad you were able to clear it up for us.

Too bad Ford changed the location of fuel tanks on the B. I checked my pictures and found this one of the area where the tank had been. This was taken before we stripped the frame. It appears the tank would have sat on top of that gasket, unless the frame horn covers mount there. I don't have the frame covers here, but after looking at this picture I think the tank is mounted right. It's not the end of the world if we have to change it up, but the nuts are a little hard to access and they have cotter pins.

600pixs.jpg

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The single generator bolt holds the generator just fine. The adjustment does not have to be that tight, so it does not really have that much pressure on it. If you have the generator adjustment too tight, it will cause excessive wear on the water pump assembly.

Henry designed these cars to work well, be reliable, simple, inexpensive, and easy to fix.

One of my favorite Model A stories was on the development of the Zenith carburetor. If I remember the story correctly... The original had 14 screws that held it together. Henry wanted it simplified. Henry's people got Zenith to redesign the carburetor so that it was held together with only two bolts. Henry took one look at it and said that is too many bolts, make it with just one bolt.... and so, the Model A Ford Carburetor ended up being held together with only one bolt. Many of those carburetors are still going strong to this day.

If there is a simple way or a complex way to do something, Henry did it the simple way. He demanded quality and reliability, but it had to be simple.

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Guest Dean_H.

Funny you mention the carburetor, I just cleaned this one up the other day. It has the one bolt holding it together. I found it sort of odd and was thinking, the whole rest of the world held carbs together with screws and this one has a bolt. Like him or hate him, Henry Ford blazed his own trail. And it's certainly hard to argue with success.

In this picture, the bolt is visible from the bottom, the other hex head is a drain plug. Personally, I like the cast iron carbs, a little heavy but last forever. This thing had some nasty gas/tar residue, but should work OK now.

600pixsa.jpg

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I have to ask...is that a 1967 or '68 Chrysler in the background that keeps peeking out? Dean, you are doing fabulous work (as usual) and your buddy had better remember you in his will when it comes to that car! So I guess Henry should have been nicknamed "One-bolt Henry" since he did that so often.

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Guest Dean_H.

'One bolt Henry' is good, certainly better than 'loose screw Henry'. Hmm.. now I know why he went with the bolt.

The other car is a 1968 Newport. It's a big beast, and a lot of fun to drive. I put some miles on it when my Hupp was in for repairs. Probably shouldn't post a picture, since it'll just make the Ford look bad. It's kind of opposite of high school dating. When one of our buddies was trying to pick up a girl. The rest of us would act like clowns to help make him look like a better catch. Not sure if it really worked, but it certainly won't help the Ford, when I post a picture of this beauty. OK.. I've derailed -sorry.

newport.jpg

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Guest Dean_H.

Wow! Pretty clever on the lubrication chart. I spent a lot of time doing every google search I could think of, but missed that one. It is quite clear in that picture. Even the hot rod would have probably had it right, to allow for body clearance. I'm going to tighten the bolts and put the cotter pins in. Thanks a lot John. With out a doubt, this forum has the best car people on the planet!

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Oddly enough, when I was 14, I had to use a lube chart for hints on how to re-assemble my 1931 Dodge coupe after my dad took it apart. The lube chart drawing was VERY valuable to me. I had no instruction book or ebay or other 1931 Dodge owners nearby, so....it was all a puzzle to me. Glad I could help verify the tank mount. It would just be a bear to have to get to it after it's all back together.

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Guest Dean_H.

The new brake shoes finally arrived. They glued the pads on instead of using rivets. I understand rivets, but glue just doesn't compute in my small brain. Oh well, I guess everyone is using glue now-a-days.

It's easy to get the brakes on this car, Ford kept it simple. Unfortunately one of the rear axle seals looked a little rough, so we left the hub off til we can get the new seal. Also installed new clevis pins and put a little grease before sliding them in. Later I greased all the zerk fittings. The peddle action is super smooth. It's hard to believe an old Ford could be coming together this nice.

Also got three of the wheels on.

12-8-10.jpg

When we put the radiator on, it touches the nut on the water pump shaft, and the fan blades are awfully close. There is no adjustment slot on the rad mounting bolts.

The water pump is one of those rebuilt ones with the modern seal and sealed bearings, evidently they put a longer shaft, than original. If you look at the picture carefully, you can see the miss aligned belt.

Gotta take it off and send it back. Too bad, I had done a nice job installing the pump. To achieve such perfection twice will be difficult. Kids don't try this at home I am a professional. :-)

12-8-10a.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest Dean_H.

Happy New Year everyone! I wish I had more progress to report, but it's been slow. Rain never seems to stop, need to keep everything indoors. Yesterday, I took the body to the body shop so they could estimate cost of painting. We also got that last wheel on, and adjusted the brakes. Here's a picture I snapped tonight.

12312010.jpg

While stripping the interior out of the car, we found a 1944 penny under the drivers seat - woohoo! Evidently the '44 cents were made from spent shell casings during the war. 100% post consumer waste! The 'greenest' penny ever made, saves the planet and polar bears. Obviously an environmentally friendly restoration. :)

1944.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...
Guest Dean_H.

Thanks for checking in Jim. It's a little slow right now. The body shop is working on the paint, the rebuilt shock absorbers still haven't arrived, and still waiting on the water pump. Fred picked up a new exhaust pipe and muffler, we'll probably install that, but otherwise it's just sitting. Truth is, I've been busy on other stuff anyway. Here's a picture I just snapped, before heading out for the day.

1-29-11.jpg

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uh oh....in my experience, a restoration slows down when you start using the car as a shelf....nice work so far by the way....I need to drag out my '31 Chevy and start doing the same.....as you say the weather isn't good for having fun with cars....

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Truth is, I've been busy on other stuff anyway. Here's a picture I just snapped, before heading out for the day.

Dean,

I guess you are busy as I happen to catch your reply this morning and noted that it must have been only 5:30 AM or so there when you snapped that picture. Hopefully things will calm down some soon and you'll have some time to get back to more important things. We're a patient bunch of watchers here but sure like the updates when they come around. Be sure to get some rest. Scott...

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Guest Dean_H.

Thanks for the compliments. For me, it's long hours for the next month or so and then things'll calm down. Well, actually... the hours are the same size, they just feel longer. :-)

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Guest Dean_H.

Today we unstacked all the boxes of parts and installed the new muffler and water pump. The new water pump is shorter than the last one and the fan now has about 1/2 an inch clearance from the radiator, which is good. Installing the muffler and exhaust pipe was pretty basic and also looked good. We're now waiting for the body shop to finish painting the body. Not sure how long that's going to take, so I re-stacked the boxes onto the frame, but snapped this picture first.

1-31-11.jpg

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Guest Backyardmechanic

Hello Dean,

as always neat job. I have a ??? for you or others in the know.is The engine color correct for a 4 cylinder Ford.The "A's" color are a real dark green.

Vern

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I think the 1932 four cylinder engine should be the same color as the Model A engine, but I could be wrong.

I too was wondering about the engine color, but on the second page, in the photo of the engine being lowered onto the frame, the color looks about right.

I am guessing it is an illusion caused by the flash used in the later photos.... but it does look light in the later photos.

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Guest Dean_H.

The camera flash does make the color look a little wacky, however I can't say if the color is right, since I've never really looked much at '32 Fords. I just called up TCP and told them I was working on a Ford Model B, and they sent me a couple spray cans of this color. The engine was painted with the darker A green when it arrived at my shop. But it was a sloppy repaint - obviously not original. We also had a book here on the Model B with color photos of an engine painted this color. The book (I think Les Andrews), meticulously listed each item painted black, such as generator and oil pan. It seemed like the author knew what he was talking about.

Oh well, it's staying this color now.

Thanks for the compliments Vern, and Matt for adding your two cents.

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Les Andrews is probably the formost authority on early Fords but all restored Model Bs (and18s for that matter)that I have seen were hunter green,the Model A color,not that I think you should change it. Also,the 33-34 Model B engine(incorrectly referred to as a Model C) has a shorter water pump to allow for the radiator leaning back further.

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  • 2 months later...
Guest Dean_H.

It's been awhile since I did an update on this project. The guys at the body shop are still working on the paint. The chassis is pretty much done, although we installed the shocks today.

4-15-2011.jpg

Here are a couple pictures from the body shop. This side of the car had some minor damage.

32ford1.jpg

32ford.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest Dean_H.

The body shop delivered the finished body this Friday. Fred went with a dark maroon color and black belt line. Originally the car was all black, but this is a nice color and the paint shop did an excellent job. They're still working on the fenders and other parts. I loosely set the body on the frame and rolled it into the shop. We plan on bolting it to the frame next weekend.

I recently got a (regular) job and won't have as much time to tinker with this thing. But fortunately the hard stuff is done, we're on the down hill stretch. :)

Here are a couple pics I snapped yesterday afternoon.

600pix-4-30-11.jpg

600pix4-30-11b.jpg

.

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Dean...thanks for the update. We have been wondering about the status of the car. That body looks so beautiful. It will be a perfect match to the precision and excellent work that you do.

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  • 1 month later...
Guest Lockcuff

Hello All, i just come upon this thread, and may i say beautiful job on the model b. I am new to these model cars. I actually have been given a trailer made from a model b axle. I was in the process of rebuilding it and pulled the drums off (front) and was gonna replace the wheel seals, but i cant find anything on what to purchase. My question is when you put the front drums back on, what did you use for a seal? or did these even have a seal?

Hope someone can enlighten me.

Thanks

Dan

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Guest Madison

I have an original Ford parts book 1928-1934 and I don't see a seal listed for the front wheel. There is a part number B-2060 called a baffle which is supposed to catch any grease that flys off of the wheel before it gets to the brakes.

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Guest Lockcuff

Hello, Thanks. I looked up that part# and i still have the baffles, so ill make sure they go back. I guess there is no seal, now ill figure out a way to seal it up a little better, or get another axle. Im afraid of dirt and water getting in. As much as i use a trailer though it may last me for the rest of my life. Also i found this baffle here Mike's I'm sure you already know this, but just in case you will now.

Again thanks for the help.

Dan

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