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Rebuilding fuel/vac. pump question


53buickconvert

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Hi Tim

The pumps are fairly easy to rebuild and if you have a manual to refer to you should be OK. The important thing is to put the new valves in the correct way up and also make sure that you get the links for the diaghrams on properly.

`Staking' refers to using a centre punch to swell the pump body 3 or 4 times around the valves so that it can't fall out.

Some of the rebuilt kits contain parts that are not too flash.

If in doubt pick up a exchange one from Bobs or on ebay.

Koala

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I just rebuilt mine at home with my 15-year-old son. We bought our rebuild kit from Then and Now (very highly recommended shop).

Four things that I learned while rebuilding:

1. Sand down each of the body mounting pieces (4 total). They more than likely have warped slightly with age. This will give you a much better seal.

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2. The Then and Now kit gives you ALL the parts you will need, plus the diaphragms contain new shafts so you don't need to grind the rivets off the old, mount the new, etc.

3. The new materials used for the diaphragms are UP TO DATE with the new fuels being used today, and they DO NOT have to be "dressed" with any lubricating ointments before reassembly. (If your kit has not been rebuilt within the last 5 years, you probably will start to experience a diaphragm that is beginning to deteriorate from the new fuels.

4. "Pre-load" or "stake" both the fuel side and the air side. It is possible to do this without the special tool. Mike, at Then and Now, talked me through this process both via e-mail and over the phone. Customer service was absolutely wonderful and very helpful. The process involves putting putting all the screws of each piece together, but not tightening them down... just get them started. Then put your rocker arm in the vice. For the fuel side, while one person pivots the pump as far as they possible can, a second person needs to finish tightening the screws. For the air side, same process, but you only pivot the arm to the point where the diaghram tightens slightly.

I am not doing the directions justice. I highly suggest you, 1. purchase your kit from Then and Now, and 2. call or e-mail for directions on this preloading part.

NOTE: This last photo shows me using my hand to pivot the rocker arm. HA!! You will NOT be able to pivot the arm by hand for the amount that is needed. You will need another set of hands and a bench vice.

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Edited by West Peterson (see edit history)
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I just rebuilt mine at home with my 15-year-old son. We bought our rebuild kit from Then and Now (very highly recommended shop).

I second that. Both kits and service are super and very reasonable. I've had a total of about a dozen fuel pumps and distributors rebuilt by them.

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Having disassembled and cleaned my pump, I'm ready to put it back together, but replacement of the interior valves is difficult. To say it's a "tight fit" would be an understatement. I know they have to be super-snug in the housing so they don't just come loose during operation, but I'm stumped as to how to get them seated properly.

Anybody have any tips?

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A bit hard to know whether you have a problem with wrong parts but you should be able to use a socket slightly smaller diameter than the valve and tap it in with a hammer then stake it in place with a centre punch.

Koala

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When repairing/rebuilding a pump that has been working and the only issue is the diaphragms I don't replace the valves. Your can verify the integrity by applying pressure and suction (you should do this anyway after replacing). If the valves pass the test I only replace the diaphragms, stem seals and fulcrum parts. On my last rebuild the supplied replacement valves for the vacuum section did not work and I had to use some left over valves from a previous project.

Willie

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A bit hard to know whether you have a problem with wrong parts but you should be able to use a socket slightly smaller diameter than the valve and tap it in with a hammer then stake it in place with a centre punch.

The socket makes sense -brilliantly obvious, in hindsight- but I don't quite know what you mean about staking it in place. If it's seated fully, isn't that sufficient?

Maybe I should just clean the old valves that still seem good and reuse them.

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Having disassembled and cleaned my pump, I'm ready to put it back together, but replacement of the interior valves is difficult. To say it's a "tight fit" would be an understatement. I know they have to be super-snug in the housing so they don't just come loose during operation, but I'm stumped as to how to get them seated properly.

Anybody have any tips?

What! Parts from the Jersey Buick guys not fitting? Who wooda thunk it?.........Bob

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