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Mark1934*
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I'll post pictures after I get the hubcaps and dual sidemounts on this weekend.

I have to work on the brakes still also. We are dying to drive her now that it is spring here! Our golden retriever wants her first convertible ride!

I'm also going to post the suppliers I used (running boards, r-board trim, wire harness, etc.) for all of you working on 1934 Dodge's.

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Hey Mark,

Maybe you can post them all to something like "Photobucket", "Flicker" or "Picasa" and just post the link here to the shared photo set. Would probably save you a bunch of time - and every one else too! (And it would give you a good off site back-up set of all your shots of the restoration!)

You decide! ;)

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  • 4 weeks later...

Sorry. Not yet. I have been "in the garage" working out a few bugs, like the brakes (which I am happy to report now work, thanks to the old AMMCO Model 1750 tool I bought to center the brake shoes). In fact, I finally drove ol' "Horce" (named after Horce Dodge) two days ago. I still have a couple of minor issues, but I promise to take pictures this weekend and post them. It was both exciting and scary to drive her down the road. My first experience driving anything older than my 53 Hudson Hornet. A completely different feel. Incidently, I drove the old '34 Dodge with the top up. Now I have to drive her with the top down this weekend. It has taken me 9 years to restore this old car (my grandfather's car); it is kind of sad that I'm almost done (are we ever done?). My wife has asked "what is next?" The next project is to help my son with his car. One last comment...people must have been really short back in 1934...I barely fit in the car (I'm 6 feet tall) and my son doesn't fit at all (6' 2"). The steering wheel is right on your lap and 1st gear is tight against my right leg. The seats in the four door convertible sedan do not adjust up or back.

Thanks for asking! Have a Great Day!

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I was lucky with the panels. No rust in any doors at all. Minor in one mudguard. Body rear behind wheel had a little bit and a bit in the floor at the front. Roof is straight and requires little work. The body shop said it was one of the best he's ever seen. And this is coming from a guy who is building an entire body for a Stanley Steamer !

I stripped the body by hand. I used paint stripper and then a strip'n'clean disc on a buffing machine and brought it back to a polished metal finish. The picture you see is the body going to have the inside and underside done and I think he uses Garnet to blast it. He's very careful not to damage any panels and when he's finished he etch primes the body ( except for the areas that I have done ). I then take it to the body shop and he repairs what need to be done. I'll then take it to a guy who puts a 2 pack epoxy undercoat on it and then it goes back to the body shop to have all the panels aligned up and then its painting. I've decided on a colour similar to Empire Maroon, with Black mudguards. Its a richer colour like the 1930 Cadillac's had. I'll keep posting photos as I progress.

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  • 2 months later...

Here are shots of the old '34 Dodge out for its maiden voyage.

I like the comparison shot of my brand new 2011 Ford truck and my Grandfather's car (restored in his memory). What a big difference in what his generation drove and what we drive. And I have eight cup holders, air conditioning, 4 x 4 (so I don't get stuck in the winter snow), and a sophisticated, satellite Sync phone/GPS/etc. system, and still I complain if I can't find a good parking spot.

:)

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  • 2 months later...
A few more pics for you !

Hello Ian, what is the make and model number of the starter on your engine?

I'm curious because it appears like you have a 1935 or newer block and the original Delco 734-H starter will not clear the water jacket area on a 1935 or newer engine when bolted to a 1934 bellhousing.

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Hi dep5,

My original engine was beyond repair and a friend found this engine in a guys shed only 5 minutes from home.

I believe its a 1940 odd engine but I had to do the following :

Modify the support bracket which ran under the sump as the 34 sump has a bend in it to allow for this bracket.

Modify the brake line ( as mine is a right hand drive ).

Change the pressure plate.

The bell housing bolted straight onto the engine.

I went to a guy I knew who has done a similar starter motor before.

I'll have to get the model if its on it when I get home and post it tomorrow.

The bell housing where the starter bolts onto it had already been ground down approx 1/8" to allow for another starter. The starter housing also had to be ground back a bit as well as it fouled on the ring gear. I then had to also grind ( very gently ) the starter motor outercasing so it flattened it off a bit. Once done ( and to my suprise ) the damn thing just bolted straight on. It took me 2 months to get the courage to turn it over as I didn't want to go through all that again !

I'll try and do a closeup photo for you as well.

Regards

Ian

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Hi dep5,

The starter I have dosn't have an ID tag on it and I cant read the guys handwriting on the receipt. I'll take it to work tomorrow and see if they can decifer it. I've attached a few closeups for you too.

Not sure about fitting early starters to later blocks, but if Manuel says you can't then thats good enough for me.

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Hi Ian,

That starter looks like it has a solenoid on it.

Solenoids replaced the little pedal in the middle of the front floor that engaged the starter mechanism.

Cheers,

Manuel in Oz

Manuel, is this the kind of starter pedal you speak of? This picture is a 1929 Chrysler Phaeton. I was never sure what that pedal was for, as it is located just in front of the driver's seat. Seems like a strange place to put a pedal.

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Not sure about 1929 models Ian.

My 33 has a pointy little pedal sticking out of the of the floor just near the gear stick.

Have a look around the rear of the engine for remnants of old linkages.

To start my car u turn the key on and push the little pedal and she fires- [sometimes].

Manuel in Oz

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Hi Manuel,

Sorry, that wasn't me who asked about the pedal on a 29 Chrysler.:rolleyes:

Looking at it though it looks like the same sort of thing but your right, it is a strange place to put a pedal. I do have the original starter pedal for my 34 Dodge ( and a few spares if anyone ever wants one ) but since the engine is a later model it was too difficult to modify the existing starter as it fouled on the engine block.

Hey Manuel...wack a few pics of your car in the album area so I can have a look at your car ! I can't get enough pictures to look through. My album is up to date now and the last pics I added is the body being brought home after epoxy priming. Now all I have to do is afford a spray painter.

Ian

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

I'm new to this web site and happened to notice the picture of the under side of a radiator cap that you were asking about. It rang a bell with me right away. Those parts used on the under side of the cap that are pictured are the same as some that are in my possession. They are parts I no longer need and if you're interested I'd sell them for a reasonable price. Good luck finishing your ride. Mike

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Hi Guys,

I am in Australia and have a 34 Chrysler Convertible Sedan just starting restoration, I know some parts are inter changable, i have almost everything to complete the restoration, although I do need a Left side head lamp support bracket, because our left wheel spent so much time in the rough at the edge of the road they failed here in OZ, and visa versa for the USA, so we are probably a good scource for those needing right ones.

Ken

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