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engine detailing


RivVrgn

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Hey guys I have a situation. I have a 65 that I want to spruce up the engine compartment. I want to paint the engine in the car and paint or replace most other stuff (brackets, hoses ,wires) I've removed some accessories and brackets and stripped the brackets ready for POR-15, but how far do i go. it's like, well while I have that off lets redo this or that, it kind of snowballs. I'm not just going to hit everything around the engine with a cloud of black paint. I want to move wires ,hoses ect. spray and place everything back. But I also don' want to totally disassemble my entire engine compartment. I'd like to remove valve covers ,intake accessories and brackets to paint the engine. Has anybody done this before? I've started scrubbing engine with wire brush and degreaser(tedious). I'm not going to remove the motor just for paint it runs great.I also don't want to remove the exhaust manifolds and take a chance on breaking a bolt for paint. no show car just make it look nice. all suggestions will be considered.

thanks, joey ROA #12735

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Guest lemmy-67

By all means don't unbolt the exhaust manifolds. especially if they are not leaking. I had the heads off of my Wildcat 430 when I first got it to replace the head gaskets (blew straight to outside: no water in cylinder), and I took the engine out while I was at it to do the main & rod bearings. Don't know how easy it is to pull a Nailhead, but the Wildcat was pretty easy to lift out & do a rattle-can job on it. Hardest part was taking off the hood: sucker weighs over 300 lbs.

Of course, I had a mishap with the rear main bearing, and didn't want to leave the clearances out of whack, so I took the car to a professional machine shop for the balance & blueprint, SS valves, bronze guides, hardened seats, reinforced rods & bolts, the whole 9 yards. Made it mechanically perfect.

Then they painted the block Chevy orange.

:(

I'd say if you want to leave it in place, just remove the carb and any vacuum hoses/electrical wires, mask the water hoses and distributor, and give it a good steam cleaning. Mask the exhaust manifolds, then rattle can the heads, intake, and oil pan with the factory color. Replace/recondition the parts that go back on, and keep on driving.

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I rattle canned under my hood. Looks tons better. I dressed it up with finned valve covers and a finned air cleaner. Mask off what you can. I wouldn't go nuts tearing all of it down. Tape and paper can cover alot. Or use a peice of cardboard to shield areas not to be painted.

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I've done this to varying degrees but on any car I intended to keep I would go deeper than just a quickie job to make it look nice to a casual observer but admittedly I tend to over do things.

Besides making it look better, whether intentional or not the engine compartment detailing process is also a great preventive maintenance opportunity. As you are doing, unbolt all the accessories. Once you have the carb off its quite simple to pull the intake. That way you can get to the valley pan and make it look really nice.

A bit more involved, I also like to pull the timing cover, replace the water pump, install a modern neoprene front crank seal replacing the old rope seal. Typically the timing covers are a source for oil and coolant leaks so regasketing helps keep your work from degrading quickly. While the timing cover is off its a good opportunity to check the nylon teeth on the timing gear. Quite often they break apart and end up in the oil pan and the result is added slop in the timing chain which reduces performance.

I agree I would be very hesitant to remove the exhaust manifolds although keep in mind all the bolts go into a blind hole in the head which drastically reduces the likelihood of them breaking since corrosion can't set in from the backside like certain bolts on the 430/455s.

Edited by JZRIV (see edit history)
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All good suggestions. I think I just needed some reassurance. I also have a tendency to go overboard. I just want it to look really nice not like it's on the used car lot with all black spray paint and spray silicone on everything to make it shiney. I think I'll pull the carb , intake and valve covers and strip them and go from there. I'm getting the carb rebuilt anyway.

What color should I use on the inner fenders and firewall semi gloss black?

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Yes - Semi-gloss black. I use 7777 Satin Black by Rustoleum but thats personal choice. Some brands of semi-gloss are too glossy for me and I have even had variation can to can within the same brand so I started using the 7777 years ago and stuck with it.......but really any thing in a semi-gloss will be close enough.

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I've found out that if you can get some of the stuff out of the way and tape/mask some of the other stuff, you can do a much neater job with a foam brush and paint in a can rather than using a rattle can. You can get right up to the exhaust manifolds and not have any over spray. Then get the high temp manifold paint and do the same thing to them.

Ed

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So.. any before and after pictures to show off?

hope so. got some befores but not sure how long the afters will take. but I'll post them when I'm done. might do some progressive pics and then the big unveiling. If I remember to take the pics.

Joey #12735

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I've found out that if you can get some of the stuff out of the way and tape/mask some of the other stuff, you can do a much neater job with a foam brush and paint in a can rather than using a rattle can. You can get right up to the exhaust manifolds and not have any over spray. Then get the high temp manifold paint and do the same thing to them.

Ed

thats my intentions also,POR-15. Tedious but, hopefully worth it.

Joey #12735

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Guest Gee_Rydes

Coming in a little late here but I have done both in the compartment and full resto style.

If you go onto my Facebook link below and look at the photos of the champagne colored 65 I did a few years ago, you may be surprised to learn that it was done entirely inside the engine compartment. Semi-gloss rattle on the perimeter and POR15 on the block.

Most people thought it was full restoration car.

post-50598-143138326206_thumb.jpg

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Coming in a little late here but I have done both in the compartment and full resto style.

If you go onto my Facebook link below and look at the photos of the champagne colored 65 I did a few years ago, you may be surprised to learn that it was done entirely inside the engine compartment. Semi-gloss rattle on the perimeter and POR15 on the block.

Most people thought it was full restoration car.

Awesome, thats the look I'm after. clean and neat.

I have a question though. Most enging pics I see, the valley pan under the intake is painted. Mine is natural metal. Probably original? I guess personal preferance on whether to paint it or not?

side note: the black one your building is really cool. It's in my favorites to follow it and steal some ideas.;)

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The valley pan would have been installed when the engine was painted. It too should be the same color as the block, heads, intake, and other assorted parts that were all torqued down when built. Buick would have built the engine, torqued the nuts, and sealed the water pump to the front cover before applying any paint. Any bracket that is held down by a torqued bolt would have been painted when the engine was painted. A torqued bolt would have never been loosened to install a bracket. Anything bolted on after the test run could be either black or engine color.

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The valley pan would have been installed when the engine was painted. It too should be the same color as the block, heads, intake, and other assorted parts that were all torqued down when built. Buick would have built the engine, torqued the nuts, and sealed the water pump to the front cover before applying any paint. Any bracket that is held down by a torqued bolt would have been painted when the engine was painted. A torqued bolt would have never been loosened to install a bracket. Anything bolted on after the test run could be either black or engine color.

gotcha. One more, air cleaner,gloss or semi-gloss? I guess all the black in there is semi?

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Guest Gee_Rydes

If the motor is out, I would paint everything separately including the valley pan. That way when it is put together all the bolts and gaskets are crisp and clean...no caffeine.

A Nailhead has a lot of smooth machined surfaces that end up being exposed even after assembly though.

For example, if you paint your heads and your valley pan separately, you will have an exposed gasket surface after assembly (where the engine ID numbers are). I go back and touch up those areas with paint (another reason why the brush on POR15 is cool and easy). There are many areas like this.

So, my preference is paint separately, touch up exposed machined surfaces after assembly, and have all bolts look like tuxedo buttons. In my case, I end up painting the gaskets seen in the seams so, in reality, I am not being completely true to the concept.

I would go semi gloss to answer the question.

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