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Ron Green

Roy Rogers Nellybelle Jeep Question

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For those of you who my wish to vote on this TV & MOVIE CAR issue ...

Please see my informal Poll in the judging forum.

NOTE:

This is MY poll and is NOT in any way connected or sanctioned by the AACA !

You can also leave your comments there also.

THE POLL IS GONE !

WHY ????????????

Edited by Silverghost (see edit history)

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No problem showing a 97 Prowler in Class 22V in 2022 but the car that inspired it, the 32 Ford from American Graffiti, is still out. And you want a class to include the Oscar Meyer Weiner? People are spending the winter scraping the undercoating off of their GTO to keep it like the factory delivered it yet you want to include the Batmobile in a movie class? The rules are clear "evaluate an antique vehicle which has been restored to the same state as when the dealer received the vehicle from the factory". Put me down for no.

Bill

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No problem showing a 97 Prowler in Class 22V in 2022 but the car that inspired it, the 32 Ford from American Graffiti, is still out. And you want a class to include the Oscar Meyer Weiner? People are spending the winter scraping the undercoating off of their GTO to keep it like the factory delivered it yet you want to include the Batmobile in a movie class? The rules are clear "evaluate an antique vehicle which has been restored to the same state as when the dealer received the vehicle from the factory". Put me down for no.
Bill, you have a right to disagree, but tell me what the difference is between the Oscar Meyer Weinermobile versus the GM Futurliner?? I don't see any difference, and anyone who has been to a meet, the Futurliner does draw a crowd.

You're right about the Plymouth Prowler, but if a TV movie class was developed, you could bring out that deuce coupe from American Graffiti, the hot rod pickup from Happy Days, the Batmobile, Monkeesmobile, the General Lee, Bigfoot, Nellybelle, Munstermobile, etc.

Understand that with your principal about factory built cars only, if your mindset was established, you could wipe out the fire trucks, almost every large commercial type vehicle, buses, Yenko Cameros, Shelby Mustangs, and even some woodie wagons.

I know I might sound out of line, but I'm surprised that I haven't seen someone show up to a meet with a restored Winnebago motorhome.

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The aim of the AACA is the perpetuation of the pioneer days of automobiling by furthering interest in and preservation of antique automobiles and by promoting sportsmanship and of good fellowship among all AACA members. The AACA uses the term "automobile" in a comprehensive sense to include all self-propelled vehicles intended for passenger use (cars, race vehicles, trucks, fire vehicles, motorcycles, powered bicycles, etc.).

Firetrucks are specifically called out in the AACA bylaws as an "automobile" and have a judging class.

The question was should we have a judging class for Movie cars. I voted no. We already had this discussion relative to hot rods and the membership's opinion was no. If we agreed not to admit the 32 Ford as a Hot Rod, I would have to say no to display of the 32 Ford as a movie car. If the question was should we have a display class for movie cars, I would vote no again.

The Future Liner and the rig in front of the Hershey Center last fall were both interesting and historically significant vehicles that deserve to be displayed at the discression of the host region and AACA. Almost every successful display of old cars has some wierd vehicle that draws a crowd and they certainly help people enjoy the show. Other than HPOF, SGCV and Driver Participation I am not aware of specific guidelines that govern the display of interesting vehicles. I would expect that if someone wanted to display the Weinermobile, 32 Ford from American Graffiti, or Jake and Elwood's 74 Dodge Monaco at a National show then its display would be at the discression of the Meet Chairman.

Bill

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I really don't think this is an issue for you to become upset about. It is unlikely to really see the light of day. Some of us that have fond memories of vehicles like Nellybelle got to "kicking this around in the school yard" and remembering those special vehicles from our childhoods in the first days of Television (it wasn't called TV yet :D ) and when we were young adults the ones we saw in movies and TV. It would be a treat to us to see them in person in one place.

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The Future Liner and the rig in front of the Hershey Center last fall were both interesting and historically significant vehicles that deserve to be displayed at the discression of the host region and AACA. Almost every successful display of old cars has some wierd vehicle that draws a crowd and they certainly help people enjoy the show. Other than HPOF, SGCV and Driver Participation I am not aware of specific guidelines that govern the display of interesting vehicles. I would expect that if someone wanted to display the Weinermobile, 32 Ford from American Graffiti, or Jake and Elwood's 74 Dodge Monaco at a National show then its display would be at the discression of the Meet Chairman.
Bill, you're right about the historical significance of the Futurliner, and I won't dispute that, but like the weinermobile, the Futurliner was not a production vehicle available to be purchased by the public.

As in the fire trucks, if the chassis was built by Ford, and gets converted into a fire truck, the truck does not get delivered as it left the Ford factory. If the fire truck came from a poor community, they built their own fire truck and there was no factory at all.

As the weinermobile, what's the difference between the company that built it, versus the company that builds fire trucks??

Trust me when I say this, that I'm not trying to upset you, but the weinermobile has evolved over the years and has historical significance in the same manner as the futurliner. The same could be said about Roy Rogers' Jeep.

The same argument applies to the race cars. most race cars were built in someone's back yard and weren't built in any factory at all.

For every argument that you have against TV & Movie cars, the same argument can be said in favor of it. Whether it's Roy Roger's Jeep or someone with a Model 'A' Ford, they're both a part of our history.

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I guess my feelings on this come across wrong in print as none of this is worth getting excited about, although I think throwing out the historically significant hot rods was a mistake. My point is, our core is the preservation of old cars. I think our shows are interesting just by the quality of the cars displayed and we don't need a midway with a freak show. We agree that there are any number and kinds of odd vehicles that could be displayed at a show, and if there is any disagreement, its how they are displayed. I would leave the guidelines as they are and if the meet chairman wants to display Bonnie and Clydes stolen 1934 Ford Fordor Deluxe, then give it a spot off to the side and show it.

Bill

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Seeing the real Nellybelle on the field was pretty neat, IMO. But let me get this straight, you want to start a "movie/TV show class? That would bring in Norm Grabowski's T that was used in 77 Sunset Strip, the California Kid '34 Ford that Martin Sheen made his mark in the movies with, the Monkey Mobile, Milner's coupe from American Graffitti, which is "known" to exist, BTW., the '55 Chevy from AG AND Two Lane Blacktop, which is the same car, the Happy Days pickup, etc. etc. Gee, does this sound anything like the "historically significant hotrod" class that several regions threatened to quit AACA if approved to anyone else? The group that was ASKED to put together the historic hotrod class was virtually run out of the annual meeting. What has changed?

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I remember the attempt of AACA to accept "historically significant hotrods", and was NOT in favor of it then. Anyone remember what the definition was? If I recall it was a modified vehicle using major components 25 years old or more. That defined "street rod".

I've seen a few "Historically Significant Hotrods" (note caps) being judged AACA, 2 examples at Hershey this past year. Seems they must have a racing pedigree to be AACA recognized.

Movie cars . . . not interesting to me.

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Yep! As an AACA member, I'm aware of the stringent documentation required to achieve race car certification. They were indeed an "Historically Significant Hotrod" (strong emphasis on Historically Significant) with a timed event pedigree. Hotrods nonetheless, and I enjoyed seeing them.

My point, as AACA members we recognize and appreciate hotrods that are historically significant to the motoring past and were actually "created/modified" over 50 years ago. I believe the owner of the 2 race cars I referred to, Mr Myers, also owns Hotrods created during the same time in history for national custom car venues rather than racing, and are as equally "Historically Significant".

Later-day street rods are clones of past history, and do not fit into the AACA mission. Maybe 50 years from now, time will render them historically significant. Who knows.

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