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Worlds Fastest Model T Ford ??


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I've posted this question on a few T websites as well. What is the fastest recorded speed of a Model T Ford powered vehicle? I don't care if it was in a Dry Lakes car in 1949 or yesterday. Has to have used a T block.

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1937~<BR>This may not be the fastest, but might get the ball rolling.<BR>The Model T-based '999 II' was clocked at nearly 108 mph on the ice of Lake St. Clair in 1912. At the same venue in 1904 Henry Ford set a land speed record 91.37 mph in the original '999'.<BR>In the book I refer to for this, there is a picture of both cars. The original is familiar to most people; I'd not seen or heard of the 'II' car before (I'm not a very good student of real early Fords). It is distinguished by a large vee'd radiator like an early Mercedes and has four exhaust stacks coming straight out the side of the hood. Two bucket seats and a small oval fuel tank, a frame and four wheels complete the picture. <BR>Further, in 1923, L.L. Corum came fifth in a single seater Ford T at the Indianapolis 500. I do not know his speed.

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Bill, Thanks for getting this thread rolling. The Ford 999 II record is well documented in the Leo Levine book Ford:The Dust and the Glory. It used a special experimental block, so I can't say it is a Model T block powered car. This car is in the Ford collection today and has been the inspiration of many T speedster builders. L.L.Corum qualified at Indy in 1923 at 86.65 MPH. So far the fastest speed I have found is 103.64 for a RAJO equiped T speedster in 1981 at Orange County International Dragway in California.

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Peter, The 999 was built by Ford in 1902. The 999 II was build in 1910, it has an experimental four cylinder engine, and used Model T axles frame and steering. Both cars are in the Ford Collection. They can be seen in the book The Cars That Henry Ford Built, by Beverly Rea Kimes, an Automobile Quarterly Library Series book.

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1937-<BR>So what's the conclusion? In other words, what is the target for the next guy?<P>By the way, thinking about this brought a couple questions to mind: <BR>What's the main differences between the Rajo and the Frontenac OHV head conversions?<BR>Did a T engine have splash lubrication? If so, how did the aftermarket guys oil the valve gear?

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Bill, There is no conclusion, I'm still trying to find a documented record for the fastest Model T Ford powered car. It must have used a stock T block. There were several different heads made by both RAJO and Frontenac, I wouldn't want to say one is better than the other. Most of the T overhead conversions used a thick felt pad soaked in oil to oil the rockers.

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1937 -<BR>After re-reading the Edlebrock history site, it looks like the 1927 T that Waite raced at Bonneville achieved something in the 160 mph range. It was then fitted with a Ford flathead V-8 (presumibly a modified V-8 60) to achieve the 192 mph.<P>A four cylinder engine certainly could get to 160 mph and much more. After all, Offenhauser engines were four bangers and were the engines of choice at Indy well into the 50s and 60s, I believe.<P>Chesapeake Region toured to the Eastern Museum of Motor Racing, north of Hanover, PA, this last spring. Among the several racing engines mounted on stands was a heavily modified model T engine. Didn't think to ask about T racing speeds.

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