Sign in to follow this  
Austin12600

Your Opinion - 1966 Ford F250

Buy it, or don't buy it?  

31 members have voted

  1. 1. Buy it, or don't buy it?

    • Buy it
      25
    • Don't buy it
      6
    • Not sure
      1


Recommended Posts

@BJM I understand what you're saying, with everything. It's not a practical vehicle, and compared to the safeness and efficiency of today's vehicles...well, it's not even close. However, I'm not necessarily buying it for that reason. I'm buying it as a learning experience, and something to have fun with. If I don't enjoy it, and don't have fun with it, then I'll simply resell it. I plan on reselling it, anyways. According to a lot of the people I've talked to, 4x4 back then is rather rare, and this truck is worth a lot more than $2,000, as it sits. I'll learn my lesson, just like you learned yours.

I'm 16, and home schooled. I don't need this truck to commute to school, or anything like that. I just want it as a project, and something to have fun with. And some of the people I've talked to, say I'll be able to double my money on it. So why wouldn't I buy it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@BJM I'm buying it as a learning experience, and something to have fun with.

In that case I think you have your answer, and you are a very fortunate young man.

One last bit of advise...opportunities like this for a good project that interests you are a lot more rare than you might think. Jump on this thing before someone else takes it!:cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And some of the people I've talked to, say I'll be able to double my money on it. So why wouldn't I buy it?

Please don't go into this with the attitude that someone told you that you will be able to double your money. It is not their hard earned money, or gifts from others that you have saved, that is being invested. Go into it as you said, because you want to learn and you want a project. Many, many folks have purchased vehicles thinking that they could turn a little profit but lost money in the end. Some had fun, some learned a lot and some wish they hadn't bought what turned out to be a money pit.

Know all you can, with help from folks that have been in the hobby for years before you plunk down that cash. Parts are not always available and when they are many times they sure are not cheap. Ask anyone that has an antique vehicle. And it isn't just the cost, it's the upkeep down the road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Please don't go into this with the attitude that someone told you that you will be able to double your money.

I understand that. It was one of the directors of AACA that told me that, so I'm pretty sure he knows what he's talking about. Like I said before, though; I don't plan on restoring it 100%. Just the stuff it needs, like tires, etc. All your opinions have helped greatly, and I really appreciate it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's plenty of good knowledgeable folks in the General Greene Chapter who can offer advice or a detailed inspection. Plus in Hershey you're just about in AACA Central.

You have to consider that 4WD trucks were very uncommon back then and usually led hard lives as power company service trucks or forestry service trucks- trucks that had to go into some ungodly places. I'm trying to see any evidence of a Duke Power or Carolina Power & Light decal on the doors. I know Duke was using beige trucks back then and I think CP&L too, though CP&L was using light blue trucks by the time I hired on in 79.

Body on this one looks pretty good though, and if the mechanicals run out OK, except for the 4WD it's really not that much different from a regular F150-F250. I think Ford was doing their 4WD in-house by that time.

I'm not sure on that pickup bed. It's 57-63, but I thought all the 64-66 Stylesides carried the 64-66 bed styling. A lot of 4WD trucks were Flareside, so I wonder if it's been changed over sometime.

If you're willing to put the time, money and effort into it, I say go for it. There's worse things a 16-year-old could do than fool with an old truck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's plenty of good knowledgeable folks in the General Greene Chapter who can offer advice or a detailed inspection. Plus in Hershey you're just about in AACA Central.

I went to the AACA HQ yesterday, to ask them about it... Like I said, the guy there said if it runs as good as it looks, it's a steal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not sure on that pickup bed. It's 57-63, but I thought all the 64-66 Stylesides carried the 64-66 bed styling. A lot of 4WD trucks were Flareside, so I wonder if it's been changed over sometime.

The 4X4 carried the earlier style box as late as 1966. I don't know why, because they were ugly compared to the "normal" 66 style box. Perhaps it has more rear tire clearance than the later style box. The front fenders are also different from the 2 wheel drive fenders. They look the same to the casual observer, but if you put a four wheel drive front fender beside a two wheel drive front fender, you will see a significant difference in the wheel opening size.

When I owned a 1964 F100, I parted out at least 4 1961-1966 F series trucks and learned a bit about the differences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BJM
@BJM I understand what you're saying, with everything. According to a lot of the people I've talked to, 4x4 back then is rather rare

I'm 16, and home schooled. I don't need this truck to commute to school, or anything like that. I just want it as a project, and something to have fun with. And some of the people I've talked to, say I'll be able to double my money on it. So why wouldn't I buy it?

Yes, you have clarified reason so I would not hesitate to buy it as an "old car/truck project". I would like to have a 66 F250 4x2 myself but only to restore and show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BJM
The 4X4 carried the earlier style box as late as 1966. I don't know why, because they were ugly compared to the "normal" 66 style box.

I am going to go with Matt on this one I just don't know them well enough. But the 66 F150/F250 Custom Cab was a very good looking American execution on the pick up truck. I thought the 67's were a step down style wise.

Good luck and let us know when you get it. If I was going to get a 66 it would be the F250 because of the 16 inch wheels. The brakes offer a greater swept area then the F100's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
John

Those are real world experiences with my 66 F250. It was a bear to drive daily. I have 5 old cars for the hobby and have owned well over 120 cars in the past 12 years from the 20's through 90's. I organized and completed a Buick Club aftertour for pre war division Buicks.

But you drive with an additional, shall we say, alertness and after a long day of driving you can be pretty stressed out. I was a mechanic when I owned it and the last thing I wanted to do when I got off work after a hot day in the garage was climb into my F250 and drive the non PS truck.

I traded it in on a new F150. The 66 had it's place and I have fond memories but do not recommend it for modern stop and go traffic.

I, too, have experience in a 65 F-150 Custom Cab, Camper Special. Granted, it was a half ton and it was 2WD. I put many, many miles on it in Los Angeles traffic. I was also a 352 (I upgraded it later to a 390) and a 4 speed. It was a bit cumbersome with manual steering and brakes, but I never felt unsafe, never got into a situation where I was not able to avoid disaster or was never, overly fatigued after a day behind the wheel. The national speed limit in 65 was 65. Still is. The kid is interested in an old truck to tinker with and, perhaps, get involved in the hobby. What would we suggest he buy? A Model "T"? Too old and unsafe. An "A"? Better but still unable to cope with today's roads and drivers. The government has already become our Mommys and Daddys, controlling every aspect of our lives with seat belts, helmets, side markers, third brakelights, don't smoke, don't do this, don't do that. Criminy!

Buy the truck. It's a hell of a good deal. Tinker with it, drive it, thrash it if you must (be safe) and enjoy it for what it is. If it turns out to be not what you expected, sell it, remember it fondly and move on to something else. The most important part is to have fun, pay attention to your, real, Mom and Dad and ignore the busy bodies who can't stand to see anyone enjoying their life. I'm 62 years old and ride a 385 horsepower motorcycle. The greenies and the worry warts hate it. That only makes me smile more:p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Please don't go into this with the attitude that someone told you that you will be able to double your money. It is not their hard earned money, or gifts from others that you have saved, that is being invested. Go into it as you said, because you want to learn and you want a project. Many, many folks have purchased vehicles thinking that they could turn a little profit but lost money in the end. Some had fun, some learned a lot and some wish they hadn't bought what turned out to be a money pit.

Hey Austin, take another look at the paragraph above, that is the wisdom of experience talking. I agree this is a good buy and said so early in your post, but thinking about the possibility of making a buck is far less important than committing (I said committing) to a project that YOU LIKE! Old car people love to talk about money and resale values but I would estimate that 60-70% of all old cars resold represent a net loss in the end. If you buy a car, spend a little on it and own it for a few years and break even you are probably ahead of the game, so you better get one you would enjoy keeping for a while. No get rich quick here, but lots of opportunities for learning new skills, hope it works out in your favor, Todd C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BUY IT! That is a great deal, you should be able to flip it for a few bucks. Good luck to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This should cinch it for you. Hemmings Classic Car came today, and in it is a small feature on a guy in Raleigh NC who has a (drum roll) 1961 F250 4x4. It's a Flareside with a 292 engine.

I've emailed a link to this thread to Richard Lentinello at HCC. Maybe he'll be gracious enough to put you in contact with Robert Gault in Raleigh- AFTER you buy this truck of course, no point in letting someone else know where it is, right? ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep in mind that it will be VERY hard to drive with no power steering or power brakes, and it WILL drink your ethanol-laced gas faster than a football team drinking free lemonaide on a hot day!

As for safety, it has NONE. It has a single master cylinder driving drum brakes, no shoulder harnesses, and the rear end will slide around and lock the brakes every time it rains. The headlights are about as bright as a Walmart flashlight with worn batteries. The fact that it is old and all steel also does NOT make it safe, no matter how many stories people tell in this forum or voice their opinion about modern 'junk' cars.

This is not a vehicle you want to drive every day at 50-70 MPH. If it is a "haul some stuff around the farm" truck, it would be great. If you are thinking of driving it in heavy traffic, or in wet weather, don't do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, if you're interested in restoring/collecting/repairing antique trucks, particularly unusual 4wd trucks like this one, there's a really good magazine you should look for. Vintage Truck ( Vintage Truck Magazine ) is one of the best written, most interesting antique vehicle magazines out there. I subscribed to it for over 10 years w/o owning an antique truck just because it was so interesting to read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess, as a lifetime motorcyclist, I don't get all of the candy a$$ed replies regarding this truck. It would seem that the, general, consensus is, "If you try to drive this truck, you will surely die or at least be horribly maimed." My God, it only has a single master cylinder. Heavens!!! Drum brakes??? Suicide!!!! No power brakes??? No way you can push the pedal with the strength of your leg only!!! "You'll put your eye out, Kid".

Excuse me. I'm going to wrap a big chain around my bike so I can't ride it and hide under the bed, wearing my full body condom, with all of the other Chicken Littles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A sign of modern times, John...:rolleyes:

We yap and yammer about getting youngsters involved in this hobby, and then when one comes up with an interesting vehicle, the nannies start in and do everything they can to discourage the kid from tackling a project. No wonder they run away from us in droves.

I look at it this way. Tackling something like this, that is not in really hateful condition, will teach a kid resourcefulness, patience, and time and money management. It will help the kid develop mechanical and possibly metalworking and soft trim skills that can be used when he's ready to take on a more difficult project.

What did you lot do with your first cars, that did not have all the government-mandated, insurance lobby-influenced safety equipment? You drove them, you repaired them, you improved them as time and money were available. And you had a good time.

I believe Austin has already indicated this won't be a daily commuter vehicle and if he makes some money off it he can put into his next old car, more power. If he doesn't make a dime off it, he's gained invaluable experience.

Austin, buy the damn truck, before I drive an hour to Greensboro and buy it myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This needs to be reread. Thanks for posting it John.

I guess, as a lifetime motorcyclist, I don't get all of the candy a$$ed replies regarding this truck. It would seem that the, general, consensus is, "If you try to drive this truck, you will surely die or at least be horribly maimed." My God, it only has a single master cylinder. Heavens!!! Drum brakes??? Suicide!!!! No power brakes??? No way you can push the pedal with the strength of your leg only!!! "You'll put your eye out, Kid".

Excuse me. I'm going to wrap a big chain around my bike so I can't ride it and hide under the bed, wearing my full body condom, with all of the other Chicken Littles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I like the truck a lot. The price seems very good. But the price of gas has kept many nice trucks like this in back yards around me. I have a 1966 1/2 ton that used to be a fairly regular driver, but all the previous comments regarding usability in modern traffic are all to true. Mine will be back on the road fairly soon but on a 76 disk braked chassis and a Cummins diesel. You cant imagine how expensive fuel is today for a truck like this. Even a few short hops quickly empty the tank, and it's over $100.00 to fill. { I am in Canada so gas is about 20 % higher than the U.S.} Obviously the 4 by 4 chassis isn't too easy to adapt to disks but it can be done. And a dual master system from a mid 70's truck is a straight forward change. These things are trucks however, and unless you NEED a truck I would leave it for someone else. I use mine for swap meets and towing my car trailer. Otherwise I use my car. As others have said; potential for learning on old vehicles 100%, potential for profit, slim to none. If you like the truck idea I would look for a 1/2 ton or even better a Ranchero. Best of luck! Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Austin, my second truck was a 69' 3/4 ton "Farm and Ranch Special" w/ a 360 engine. No power stearing or brakes. Did have automatic and factory air.

It's gonna drive like a truck,period. Don't let that scare you. No power was normal for years. As long as the truck is moving, stearing is not really a problem. Gas mileage is gonna suck.

At 16 the odds are if you drive very much at all, you will end up dinging or scratching it. Happened to both my kids and most of their friends (me too for that matter). My advice is buy it,drive the heck out of it, don't worry about the dings or scratches and in a yr. or two, sell it and get something else you want. Better a 2K truck that gets messed up than a 5K car. Just my 2 cents worth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great looking truck Austin, Hope you pick it up soon. I have a '66 Ford 3/4 ton with a service body. It's a rock solid work horse and very reliable. You don't need power steering, these old trucks turn very easy. And the double master cylinder is overrated. When was the last time you heard of someone bursting a brake line. You still have the E-brake in the unlikely event of brake failure. And I cannot for the life of me figure out why anyone would want a lighter duty p/u. That truck is usable, just imagine how impressed your girl friend will be when you tow your boat to the lake and still have plenty of load capacity for all the camping gear. You need this pick-up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only deal breaker for me would be rust. With the possible exception of chrome, rust is the most expensive thing to deal with. The mechanicals of this truck are very simple. There is ample room to reach things and parts are likely to be easy to find.

If it talks to you, go for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 1962 F-250 4x4 that I have run for years. Just started it the other day infact after it has been sitting for a year or more. It has a 272 V8. The biggest problem that you will have is the rear brake drums if they go bad, thin, or crack. They are different than the two wheel drive rear drums as the bolt pattern end is dished one inch more than the standard drums. The rear 4x4 drums are no longer avalible. I, 20 years ago, use to trailer with my 1962 ford truck often and never has any real problem stopping it. Of course I did in later years update it to a two stage master just for safetys sake. My truck originaly had a 223 CID 6 cylinder, with a 3 on the tree, which was underpowered for the truck. I still sometimes plow my driveway with it in the winter. She's a tough old war wagon. :cool: Dandy Dave!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this