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Austin12600

Your Opinion - 1966 Ford F250

Buy it, or don't buy it?  

31 members have voted

  1. 1. Buy it, or don't buy it?

    • Buy it
      25
    • Don't buy it
      6
    • Not sure
      1


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I'm looking at buying a 1966 Ford f250, 4x4, manual transmission, custom cab, with a 352 V8. The guy is asking $2,000. You can see from the pictures there is minimal rust, and it's in half decent condition. I'm only 16, so I'm obviously not too experienced. I was just wondering your opinion of whether or not this is a good deal...

What do you think? My intentions with it would be to fix it up a bit, drive it around, and eventually sell it.

Also, what exactly does "Custom Cab" mean?

IMG_0005.jpgIMG_0017.jpgIMG_0012.jpgIMG_0002.jpg

For more images:

1966 f250 pictures by austin12600 - Photobucket

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Can you afford it ?/ Not only can you afford to buy it for 2,000 but can you afford the care and feeding of it afterwards.

You might be lucky to get 10 - 15 mpg, less if you drive with a heavy foot. This is a 3/4 ton which means it is really going to ride like a truck. Bouncy and stiff, you will feel every bump.

It is a 4 X 4 too which while it has its advantages, it also means twice the stuff to break. And it will get you get farther away before you get stuck. Dont ask me how I know this.

Can you afford insurance ? Have you checked with your parents insurance carrier to see what it will cost ? Can you drive a manual transmission and will you want to drive one for a couple of years ? Are you mechanically inclined and are you willing to invest the time and money fixing something that breaks ? It weill be expensive taking it to the mechanic.

If you are serious, you may want to get a mechanic to look it over for you. Nothing worse then spending hard earned or saved money on something that will keep you broke all the time fixing it.

Just some things to think about from someone who has been where you were when I was younger. Good luck with your decision.

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Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. Good to see that you are interested in old vehicles and have found this site. If you like the truck, and it runs well, I would think that it may very well be worth that. If you are looking at it as an investment, don't buy it for that reason. If you really want to buy an old 4X4 Truck to drive, then it may be exactly what you need.

If I remember correctly, custom cab is simply the name that Ford used for their standard pickup bodies in that era. The 4X4 trucks are a little different from the 2 wheel drive ones. The box on the 4X4 truck is the style of box that was used on the 1961-1963 2 wheel drive trucks, but I think that it is the correct one for the 1966 4X4 trucks. Also, the 4 spoke steering wheel is a 4X4 only part. Getting parts for the 4X4 truck will be a bit more of a challenge than the same year 2 wheel drive truck, as the 4X4 parts are a little bit rarer.

Dennis Carpenter Reproductions will be a good source for parts for this truck if you do buy it and need things for it. Here is a link to the Carpenter site:

Dennis Carpenter Ford Car, F-100 Pickup Truck, 8N, 9N Tractor and Cushman Scooter Restoration Parts

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Can you afford it ?/ Not only can you afford to buy it for 2,000 but can you afford the care and feeding of it afterwards.

You might be lucky to get 10 - 15 mpg, less if you drive with a heavy foot. This is a 3/4 ton which means it is really going to ride like a truck. Bouncy and stiff, you will feel every bump.

It is a 4 X 4 too which while it has its advantages, it also means twice the stuff to break. And it will get you get farther away before you get stuck. Dont ask me how I know this.

Can you afford insurance ? Have you checked with your parents insurance carrier to see what it will cost ? Can you drive a manual transmission and will you want to drive one for a couple of years ? Are you mechanically inclined and are you willing to invest the time and money fixing something that breaks ? It weill be expensive taking it to the mechanic.

If you are serious, you may want to get a mechanic to look it over for you. Nothing worse then spending hard earned or saved money on something that will keep you broke all the time fixing it.

Just some things to think about from someone who has been where you were when I was younger. Good luck with your decision.

I realize the work this truck entails. That's part of the reason I'd like to get an old car, though. I want to learn how to fix them/etc, and old cars are very simple.

More importantly, like you mentioned, I'm wondering if I can afford it. This truck is in the Blue Book for $5,000. I'm wondering what I'd be able to resell it for, if I fixed it up a bit, and maybe gave it a new paint job... Knowing that would give me a better idea of whether or not I could afford it.

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My best advice is buy it is you want it, don't buy thinking that you plan to sell it for a profit. That almost never happens with an antique vehicle. Fixing it up usually costs much more than what you will later be able to sell it for.

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My best advice is buy it is you want it, don't buy thinking that you plan to sell it for a profit. That almost never happens with an antique vehicle. Fixing it up usually costs much more than what you will later be able to sell it for.

I understand. Thanks for your help. I think I'm going to try and do a little more research

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Nada PRICE is $5,850 for a low value. $15,700 for an excellent one.

Sometimes the low value is too much but at 1/3 of that price, $2000 seems to be a bargain.

All of the above mentioned thoughts should be considered but you have to start somewhere.

It looks like it is in decent shape.

I would go for it! (but this is advice from someone that just bought a 56 F750 for my next toy, not a daily driver)

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If you will share where you live we can maybe hook you up with a local AACA Region or Chapter where you could meet folks that might be willing to go look at the truck with you.

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If you will share where you live we can maybe hook you up with a local AACA Region or Chapter where you could meet folks that might be willing to go look at the truck with you.

That'd be great, but it's a little bit of a complicated situation. I live in Hershey, PA. However, the truck is in Greensboro, NC. They guy selling it lives right next to my uncle's house, in Greensboro. I go there to visit him often, and that's the only reason why I know about it...

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Hello Austin, if a bare bones old pickup is what you want it looks like a good buy to me. I agree with Matt Hinson about the potential for profit, but at this price your downside is pretty limited as long as you don't have to do a major overhaul.

Looking at an old car in general and an old truck in particular the two biggest problems are rust and owner modifications and this looks to be excellent in both those areas. The mechanicals are indeed simple and parts availability is excellent through mail order and probably OK locally through NAPA. Good luck and keep us posted, Todd.

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One of the first trucks (besides a 1946 Dodge farm truck) I drove was a 1966 Ford 1 ton (F350?) 2 wheel drive. Very good durable truck. Hard to tell from your pictures--but it doesn't look to have rust out in the fenders--that is where the 66 my Dad had developed rust. It looks like good potential...

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Here is the list of Regions/Chapters for North Carolina. I looked at an on-line map and it seems that High Point might be one of the closest groups to where the truck is. Take a look at the list and see what you think. There is contact information for each group.

NORTH CAROLINA

Alamance Region

President - Talmage Johnson

PO Box 426

Mebane NC 27302

Deep River Region

President - Ronnie Larkins

2401 Krista Kim Dr

High Point NC 27265

Foothills Region

President - Richard Bolick

4091 County Home Road

Conover NC 28613

Great Smoky Mountains Region

President - W Boyd

2 Mt Olive Ter

Asheville NC 28804

Great Smoky Mountains Region - Little Detroit Chapter

President - Charles Shelton

PO Box 236

Bostic NC 28018

Hornets Nest Region

President - John Boles

9307-H Monroe Rd

Charlotte NC 28270

Mid-Carolinas Antique Drivers Region

President - Eric Marsh

575 Paulownia Dr

China Grove NC 28023

Mountaineer Region

President - Pam Ferguson

95 Underwood Cove Rd

Waynesville NC 28786

North Carolina Region

President - Randal Stone

B07 275

Bridgeton NC 28519

North Carolina Region - Cape Fear Chapter

President - Gary Henderson

902 Beacon St

Hampstead NC 28443-2104

North Carolina Region - Catawba Valley Chapter

President - David Clark

1920 32nd St NE

Hickory NC 28601-3232

North Carolina Region - Coastal Plains Chapter

President - Willie Wallace

4001 S Elm St

Greenville NC 27858

North Carolina Region - East Carolina Chapter

President - Jeffrey Mashburn

4896 Mc Arthur Rd

Broadway NC 27505

North Carolina Region - First Capital Chapter

President - Zachary Simons

1581 Davis Field Rd

Pollocksville NC 28573

North Carolina Region - Furnitureland Chapter

President - Jack Harris

2038 N Clodfelter Rd

High Point NC 27265

North Carolina Region - General Greene Chapter

President - Don Reece

6202 Oak Bur Ct

Pleasant Garden NC 27313-9540

North Carolina Region - Morehead City Chapter

President - Gerald Porterfield

161 Hunting Bay Dr

Cape Carteret NC 28584

North Carolina Region - New River Chapter

President - Fran Oakes

102 Converse Dr

Jacksonville NC 28546-7512

North Carolina Region - North Central Chapter

President - Forrest Cozart

191 Graham Day Rd

Roxboro NC 27574

North Carolina Region - Old Salem Chapter

President - John Ronchetti

1025 Pine Knolls Road

Kernersville NC 27284

North Carolina Region - Sandhills Chapter

President - Wade Weatherly

215 Melrose Dr

Pinehurst NC 28374

North Carolina Region - San-Lee Chapter

President - Robert Buzinski

460 Buckroe Dr

Sanford NC 27330

North Carolina Region - Southeastern NC Chapter

President - Danny Radcliff

422 Albritton Rd

Mt Olive NC 28365

North Carolina Region - Three Rivers Chapter

President - Paul Gover

1071 Grogan Rd

Stoneville NC 27048

North Carolina Region - Triangle Chapter

President - Chester Butcher

600 Occoneechee Dr

Fuquay-Varina NC 27526

Zooland Region

President - Joe Taillon

1533 Creekside Dr

Randleman NC 27317-7737

Edited by Shop Rat (see edit history)

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Novaman, is relatively close to there. Perhaps David will chime in with an offer to take a look at it with you the next time you are down. I am a few hours away, but if nobody else can help, let me know and I can look at it with you. I have some experience with 61-66 Ford Trucks as I previously owned a 1964 and went through a few parts trucks as well.

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I would say one of the following regions is the one to contact...B

General Greene Chapter

President - Don Reece

6202 Oak Bur Ct

Pleasant Garden NC 27313-9540

Deep River Region

President - Ronnie Larkins

2401 Krista Kim Dr

High Point NC 27265

Edited by Earl B. (see edit history)

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My son's first vehicle was a '77 Ford 3/4 Ton 4 Wheel Drive with a big engine and he had an absolute BALL with it and I was secure in the knowledge that, Heaven fordid, he got into an accident he would likely fare better than the other vehicle. I say if you really like the truck buy it and enjoy it. Down the road you'll never regret your decision.

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buy it, see if you can get it for less

that truck is worth WAY more than that as it sits ....

don't let anyone know where it is or you will find that someone else has bought it out from under you

the sure thing $$$$ profit brings out the flipper in people ...

If it runs and drives as well as it looks, this is a no brainer

have fun with it, learn how to do stuff with it and I am CERTAIN you will be able to double your money, the Custom Cab 4 wheel drive is a rare vehicle, very few were made with the Deluxe stuff this one has, it is quite the find, go for it

Edited by Jim Rohn (see edit history)

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Also, what exactly does "Custom Cab" mean?

From the 1966 chapter in The Standard Catalog of Light Duty Ford Trucks 1905-2002:

Custom Cab package includes striped upholstery with bolster and vinyl facings, a chrome horn ring, a cigar lighter, a left hand arm rest, a right hand sun visor, extra insulation, a bright metal grille and headlight assembly, bright metal windshield reveal moldings, matched locks on both doors, Custom Cab plaques, and bright hubcaps.

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If you're planning on driving this truck as your primary vehicle, pay attention to how this truck was used recently. It could look exactly the same, but if it's been sitting without use for years or being driven every day will make a big difference in how reliable it will be in the short run.

Judging by the heater hoses in the photo I think it's a safe bet that this truck has been sitting for a long time. I think you can figure on replacing everything on the car made of rubber (EVERYTHING!), as well as (of course) all the fluids. The brake lines in particular will need to be thoroughly flushed, and quite likely will need to be replaced. The other components may need replacement or refurbishment as well.

Also the 10-15 mpg figure for a 352 4WD is a bit optimistic. Depending on the gearing, I'd be very happy to get 12 mpg out of this truck under any circumstances. 8 mpg in city driving would not be uncommon.

However if you're considering restoring this truck as a show/hobby vehicle that will not get very many miles (<2500/yr.), most of this doesn't matter and this looks to be an excellent opportunity.:cool:

Edited by Dave@Moon (see edit history)

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Guest BJM

I owned and drove daily a 1966 Ford F250 Custom Cab 2wd. That truck you have I believe is a 1965.

However, since mine was a 2wd Ford may have equipped 4X4 versions differently but I think it's a 1965 in the photos.

My Custom Cab had heavy chrome "Custom Cab" badges on the doors I think and also had a Twin I Beam badge.

My Custom Cab had aluminum grille as opossed to painted, it had an aluminum trim piece running front to back - this truck does not.

On the inside the 66 Custom Cab had vinyl on the doors and what most of us consider "engine turned" aluminum inserts around the gauge package and my gauge package had everything. This one does not. The 66 F series had a long ribbon gauge not a round one. No door pockets.

My F250 was a 352 with 4 speed, granny low. It had no power steering and no power brakes and remember these still have a kingpin front suspension.

You will get your exercise steering and driving this beast. I did.

I got 15 mpg but kept my foot out of it and it was 2wd. I had "modern" tires up front and Bridgestone Duelers ont he rear. These are 16 inch tires and wheels. Without a highway style radial tire on the front you better have guns for forearms or you won't be able to steer.

That rear tailgate and taillamp set up is aftermarket. I am not saying it was not put on by the dealership and I can see it says FORD on the tailgate but is not close to what mine was and mine had long rectangular taillamps noot round.

I think's a 65 and may be a custom cab 65 but in 66 Custom Cab was a huge step up from grocery getter 66 F series in terms of trim.

Do not buy this truck. It's a lot of work to drive. Kind of neat but youwould be more likely to get in an accident with this truck then one with modern conveniences such as PS and PB and dual master cylinder.

Your reaction times on this truck will be 3 times as long as a more modern truck. As soon as you press the brakes for an emergency stop you will lock them up. Emergency maneuvers are not possible and the focus and concentration it takes to drive this in modern traffic conditions is unreal.

Drivers will be flipping you the bird as you slowly get away from a stop. Top speed will be 60 mph and your ears will ring from the noise level. I don't know about you but I kind of want to enjoy my driving time.

I drove my truck for about 2 years and loved it but it was alot of work. I now own a 71 Chevy 3/4 ton Custom Camper with PS, PB, factory disc brakes A/C and 4 speed manual. It is safe, easy to drive, goes over bumps with a solid feel. Radio, etc, high vantage point.

I might buy an 1966 F250 2 wheel drive but only to restore and show, not to drive much at all. These are great looking trucks. In my opinion, the best looking Ford truck ever so your post caught my eye. Remember, automatic transmissions and power steering were still high cost, rarely seen options on F series trucks in 1966, your truck here is "typical" of what to expect from used F series circa 1965-66.

Edited by BJM (see edit history)

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Jake,

I will have to pull out a parts book, but I think it is a 1966. The secret is that it is 4X4. The 4X4's were different than the two wheel drive models. It has a 1966 grill, but a lot of the 1961s to 1965s grills have been changed to 1966 grills since that is the only one that is available in reproduction.

The box looks correct (the earlier style that carried over later on the 4X4s) but I think it has some extra aftermarket reflectors mounted over the taillights.

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@Dave Nice eyes! You're correct. The man who is selling it to me is next to blind. He stopped driving it about 5 years ago, because his eyes got too bad. It's been moved around the drive way, but nothing on the road, for the last 5 years. How hard/how many man hours do you think it would be to replace all the rubber?

@BJM I'm positive it's a 1966. The guy has all the original manuals that came with it.

My uncle took me in to see Steve Moskowitz, this afternoon. He said it's a steal, and I might be able to double my money, on it. According to him, having 4x4 makes this truck more rare. And from the research I've done online, I've seen way more 4x2s than 4x4s. Also, automatics seem to be more common, than manuals.

I realize these trucks are a lot more dangerous than the more modern trucks. As a matter of fact, my dad already gave me a lecture on the master cylinder, and how it's much safer to have dual lines.

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@Dave Nice eyes! You're correct. The man who is selling it to me is next to blind. He stopped driving it about 5 years ago, because his eyes got too bad. It's been moved around the drive way, but nothing on the road, for the last 5 years. How hard/how many man hours do you think it would be to replace all the rubber?

The coolant hoses would be relatively easy, a couple of hours or so. The brake work might take a full afternoon to replace all the hoses, master cylinder, and wheel cylinders if everything goes right. It won't, and you'd probably do good to get new metal lines and a power brake booster too. Figure 2 days hard work for that. The tires will have to go too of course.

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Do not buy this truck. It's a lot of work to drive. Kind of neat but youwould be more likely to get in an accident with this truck then one with modern conveniences such as PS and PB and dual master cylinder.

Your reaction times on this truck will be 3 times as long as a more modern truck. As soon as you press the brakes for an emergency stop you will lock them up. Emergency maneuvers are not possible and the focus and concentration it takes to drive this in modern traffic conditions is unreal.

Drivers will be flipping you the bird as you slowly get away from a stop. Top speed will be 60 mph and your ears will ring from the noise level. I don't know about you but I kind of want to enjoy my driving time.

So, all of the vehicles on the road without all of the modern bells and whistles are unsafe and should not be driven. You should work for the government and try to ban all of these deathtraps that we all love.

Here's a heads up for you, your reaction time is exactly the same sitting on your couch as it would be in a top fuel dragster. Vehicle choice has no bearing on reaction time.

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Guest BJM

John

Those are real world experiences with my 66 F250. It was a bear to drive daily. I have 5 old cars for the hobby and have owned well over 120 cars in the past 12 years from the 20's through 90's. I organized and completed a Buick Club aftertour for pre war division Buicks.

I'm not saying this truck could not be restored and shown at club events. But it was built 45 years ago and can not keep up comfortably with modern commuter traffic. I am just providing my knolwedge and experience. I remember driving the truck to work and back 20 miles round trip. I took it to pick up an engine in Minnesota and body parts in Wisconsin - very dependable.

But you drive with an additional, shall we say, alertness and after a long day of driving you can be pretty stressed out. I was a mechanic when I owned it and the last thing I wanted to do when I got off work after a hot day in the garage was climb into my F250 and drive the non PS truck.

I traded it in on a new F150. The 66 had it's place and I have fond memories but do not recommend it for modern stop and go traffic.

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