Jump to content

57 Buick Winshield Removal - Do it yourself or have it done?


Recommended Posts

I need to replace my windshield on my 57 Buick special Model 48. Mine is cracked. I have bought a new one and a new gasket. The big question is, is this something I can do myself or should I take it to a glass house hand have it installed. I have all the documents and factory information on how to do it. Anybody out there who has done it in their garage? Looking for help here. Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't find it difficult to remove the windshield on my B-59 (tho I haven't put a new one in yet). At the very least- I would hope bringing a car to a pro with the old WS already out would save a few bucks on the install.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cut the gasket around the pinchweld all the way around. The windshield comes out easily with two people. When installing, you may need to install the header stainless first before installing the windshield/ gasket. I assisted with the installation on mine. Make sure they (or you) liberally coat the windshield and pinchweld grooves with gasket sealer (not silicone) or it will leak. If you decide to do it yourself, watch a video on YouTube to see how other people have done it. It honestly isn't that hard to do if you have patience and assistance. Good luck

Edited by buick5563 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I removed and replaced the windshield on my brother's '61 Ford. It was the first time I performed this operation. It worked out well. I installed the new seal on the glass a few days prior to the installation. This allowed the seal to form to the glass. Be sure to use quality string. I used drapery cord. I only had one concern. The glass was slightly off center in the opening by 1/4 inch. I let it sit overnight. The next day, the glass centered itself to the exact spot it had spent the previous 49 years. Be sure to have a helper apply gentle and even pressure. You will be surprised how easy this is. Good luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys. Mike you mentioned a video on YouTube. Can you provide the site or what the video is called? It looks like it is a two person job either way you look at it. Mike, where did you get the gasket sealer and can you give me the name of it? How long did it take to do the job? Did you use spacers and such as shown in the Buick winshield install instructions? Thanks for the tip on the type of cord to use. Is smaller cord better to use than larger diameter cord? sorry for all the questions but I think I will only have one shot at this and it is better to get as much info prior to the job. Thanks everyone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I should have stated that differently. I haven't seen a video on YouTube, I just figured there had to be one. Every time I have needed to do something new, I always check there first.

At a glass (windshield) place, they have a sealer meant specifically for this purpose. When I did my 55, I helped the body guy who also did glass for a living so we used their stock.

The last time I did it in a 1947 Spartan travel trailer, I borrowed a can (from a different friendly glass shop) with the "gun" attached. This gun looks like an old timey oil squirt gun with a trigger. You may get lucky and not have to leave a deposit since they rarely use these anymore.

If I'm not mistaken, the new rubber is thicker, meaning you don't need the spacers. I know I didn't use any. Taking the windshield out is fast, like under an hour. Installing takes longer scratching your head, fretting about it than it does to do it...maybe a couple of hours?

Just for a bit of clarification, you install the rubber around the glass with the pookie first, then use soapy water to lube the outer channel, along with aforementioned string, THEN once it is in, pookie the pinch weld side. Sorry for neglecting that in my previous post.

Somebody please jump in here if I am leading Jim astray.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just went on YouTube and searched for classic-windshield-installation. There are plenty available. I just watched one with Dennis Gage and the owner of Steele Rubber. They didn't use any pookie at all. I know mine leaks even after using it...take that as you will :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

The one important thing that has not been mentioned here or on the videos that I saw is to mark the center of the glass and the opening. This is a must for curved glass! Also mark the seal if it is squared (not necessary if one big loop). The splice on the seal is usually at the top.

Willie

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done it before but on a wrap-around windshield like the '57 Buick, I would be very reluctant to do it myself. Those wrap-arounds are very difficult to install and easy to break. All it takes is one mis-step, and you have $500 or more down the drain. Every time I install one myself, it always takes 3 or 4 times as long as I think it should take, and I swear I will take it to a professional glass installer next time. The flat and slightly curved windshields on the older cars (pre-1954 Buicks) are not too hard to install, but the newer wrap-around ones are only for the experienced installer, in my opinion. Professional glass installers earn their money, no matter what it costs. They can do it in one-quarter the time it would take me to do it, and if they crack it, they buy the new one, not you.

Pete Phillips, BCA #7338

1948 Roadmaster model 71

1949 Super model 59

1950 Roadmaster model 76-R

1959 Electra 2-dr. ht.

1962 ELectra 225 4-dr. ht.

1963 Wildcat conv. 4-spd.

Edited by Pete Phillips (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
They can do it in one-quarter the time it would take me to do it, and if they crack it, they buy the new one, not you.

Pete Phillips, BCA #7338

1948 Roadmaster model 71

1949 Super model 59

1950 Roadmaster model 76-R

1959 Electra 2-dr. ht.

1962 ELectra 225 4-dr. ht.

1963 Wildcat conv. 4-spd.

So the way you tell it it's like buying insurance for the install...

No muss no fuss and best of all NO STRESS!

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK..now I am torn. I can't find any local glass shops who will do the job, but it sounds like Pete has some pretty salient ponts. I have looked at all the installation instructions and it does look like it can be done. Anybody else want to put their two cents in for a comment or insight? This weekend is when I need to get it done or not. Thanks everybody.

Link to post
Share on other sites

have at least 2 people (a third to center from the inside wouldnt' hurt) and some patience and give it a whirl.

I have removed '59 glass by myself, but I wouldn't ever try installing it that way!

Have lots of padding around to prevent any damage to the car or windshield.

Maybe there is someone on the forum near you that has done it?

Where are you located?

Instead of glass shops, you might try restoration shops if you want someone else to do it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was fortunate enough to have an experianced glass guy come to the shop to help put the wind shields in my 55 and 57. Actually it's more correct to say I helped him. I cannot tell you exactly how to do it but I can say this guy knew what he was doing and it went well.

However, all through the procedure he would tell me what NOT to do and where NOT to put any pressure because "if you press in the wrong place at the wrong time it's real easy to break these wrap around jobs".

Forewarned is forearmed.

BTW, he also said, as did another glass shop, if it breaks we're not finacianally responsible................Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, he also said, as did another glass shop, if it breaks we're not finacianally responsible................Bob

So what you are buying is a reduced risk level for the install and not insurance for breakage?

Still sound like a deal to me...I would think most glass shops have a mobile service?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps had I taken the car to the shop and just said "put a new windshield in" they then would take responsibility for breakage since they were making a profit on both the glass and labor, plus there would have been a measure of control over the supplier and quality of the new glass. In my situation and I think the one here, it's " I've got this here glass, put it in for me".

I can't blame them for backing away from financial responsibility..........Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, I successfully put a new windshield in my 58 by myself and also removed and replaced the backlite with a new gasket. Probably lots of luck was on my side, but I just followed the manual. One thing I was surprised about was how hard I had to pull the cord when going around the A pillar. Like it was said before, let it sit for a few days to a week before getting dissatisfied with the way the windshield and gasket are set - it will center itself and the gasket will orient the right way (no gaps between the gasket and glass on outside) if you wait.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just had the windshield and back glass installed in my Mustang...The labor for both windows worked out to under 100 dollars, including molding installation. IMO, that was money well spent. Once again, you can do it, but why take a chance on screwing something like that up or breaking a windshield. The price included coming to my house to install it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...