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Brake Drum Removal with Tapered Axle


Steve Braverman

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I've removed many of these drums before, and I have the proper puller to do it. My problem is that this one is so stuck, that the puller is actually stripping the lug nuts right off their studs. I know that I will now have to replace the studs, that's not so bad, but I have to get the drum off and the lug studs are losing their threads.

If I apply heat to the hub with my oxy-acetylene torch, will I weaken the hub or the axle? Or will I damage the bearing?

BTW, the car is my 1932 Plymouth PA.

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I would use a propane torch, see if you can get some penetrating oil in while your doing that too, the oil will migrate with the heat. Try hitting the drum with a dead blow-not too hard but enough shock to knock it loose from side to side. Hit on the outside edge of the drum. After this episode is over, anti seize around that axle flange. If there is enough meat on the drum, drill and tap two 6mm holes per drum so the next time you take them off all you have to do is thread two bolts into the drum and they will hit the axle flange and push the drum out. All Datsun/Nissan/ vehicles with drum brakes came this way from the factory just for this reason.

Don

Edited by helfen
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Tighten the puller as much as you can with out damaging anything further. Heat the axle hub. You don't want to get it red but 400-500 degrees (way too hot to touch) will not damage the steel. An O/A torch with rose bud tip is best. Propane takes too long and soaks the heat into the bearings and seal. Strike the hub sharply on the sides with a copper or brass hammer. Try tighting a bit more and repeat blows. That usually will do it................Bob

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Bobs methode would be mine as well, the only thing not to do in my opinion, is hammering the drum, it may brake at the first blow.

There is no need for it either, that is, I never needed to do it.

You should give a big blow on the puller centre rod after the heating process

should it not break loose, leave it over night and try it again the next dat, chance is it will be free in the morning. Please leave the axle nut in place after loosening it, it will prevent damage to the axle thread as well as keeping the drum in place after it comes off with a big bang. It may brake to pieces when it falls on the floor. Johan

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If there is enough meat in the drum, drill and drill two holes of 6 mm for each drum so that the next time you remove everything that has to do is thread the two screws on the drum and come to the axis push the drum.

Yes, see thread #2 for proper procedure.you don't want to drill & drill, you want to drill & tap a 6mm hole for a 6mm bolt.

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If I read this correctly, you said tapered axle. There is is no flange on a tapered axle so no reason to drill holes in your drum. I've had luck in the past hitting the drum casting just a little off center close to the axle taper bore. Similiar to the old trick of hitting one side of a spindle arm while bucking the other side to shock the bore and make it release the stuck tie rod or ball joint.

Howard Dennis

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If you are using a puller that attaches to the lugs, you are using the wrong puller. Get a puller that fits in the groove in the hub.

Once again, I think you guys are missing the description, "tapered axle", every tapered axle I've ever seen that is exactly how you remove the drum. The studs or in the Mopar design, the threaded hole goes with the drum.

The attached picture is later than what we are talking but I believe the early Mopars still used this type drum and hub combination and it comes off the same way.

Howard Dennis

post-33891-143138258287_thumb.jpg

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This is the type puller I use for tapered axels on Crosleys. Just thread on till it is almost tight, rap it a sharp blow with a hammer and they all most always pop off the taper.

Puller1.jpg

Puller2.jpg

Puller3.jpg

Crosley is the same size as Model T so they are easy to come by.

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The early Fords up to 1949 all have tapered axles with key ways and use a special puller that locks onto a cast ridge on the outside of the drum. Even with this they are sometimes very difficult to remove but if pressure is put on the puller and then the end of the puller is hit with a large hammer they will usually let go. If not, heat is applied to the ouside of the axle/drum with the pressure on the puller. Another method is to undo the axle nut a couple of turns and the drive around the yard in circles for a while and usually it will let go.

David

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  • 3 weeks later...

I finally got the drum off today. I took some heat from my oxy-acetylene torch, some new lug nuts, and lots of beating on the puller.

I've removed many drums of this type, including this one, and never had this much trouble. I've succeeded in ruining all of the lug studs, even bending one, and they're 9/16" studs! No light-weights.

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