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Series 40 Dash-panel


kevzpix

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Hi

I wonder if anyone has any tips for me, on restoring the striped design, on the worn dash panel, on my 1935 Series 40. As you can see from the attached pics, the matt-black stripes, are worn off, especially where the control knobs, come thru the panel. The stripes are very narrow, being slightly more than a millimetre each wide. They seem too narrow for masking, and what kind of paint would best reproduce these matt black stripes. I would appreciate any ideas.

:confused:

Kevin

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Guest Grant Magrath

I might be able to offer some help here! First, I'm not familiar with the 35 dash, but is the paint on the raised bits, or the depressions. If the depressions are black, spray the correct color black from a spray can over the whole thing, then, try using a cloth with thinners on it to carefuly wipe the paint off the high bits. Tidy up the stubborn paint with some thinners on a q-tip. The slower drying paint, the better.

If the paint is on the high bits, try doing the same thing, but use something to wipe the paint out of each groove. Painfully slow, but well worth it. Alternatively, there's an old modeling technique called drybrushing, where you repeatedly, and lightly, brush paint over the high bits with a nearly dry brush, slowly building the paint up by each stroke. Quicker drying paint would help with this.

Hope that helps!

Cheers

Grant

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Guest Earl

Sometimes you can also just clean it up as best you can and clear coat the whole thing and that will brighten up the black enough that's still in the grooves that it will look like new. Not always, but sometimes that will really make some of that sort of thing look great. On phonograph ID tags I usually spray the whole thing with black lacquer and leave it dry in a warm place for a week or so until the paint cures hard and is sandable, and then sand it off with a cork sanding block and 1000 or 1200 grit sandpaper with water and a little bit of window cleaner or dish soap. It may take awhile to sand off the paint, but will not destroy the detail. You can use finer sandpaper as well if you'd like. I just don't have a steady enough hand with a small brush, but that will work as well. There's some nice detail in your dash. Those 35's are nice looking cars.

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Kevin,

I experimented with all the above but couldn't get a really good result ( had a few spare dash panels to play with!!! )

I could see it would work on the vertical lines but the Buick logo and edges are like an old lithograph ( think that's what they were called ) , almost stenciled on to the metal. As soon as you touch the surface with sandpaper you loose definition.

At the end of the day the best I could come up with was to polish the entire surface with auto polish and then remove all traces of polish from the grooves with a cotton bud.

I then rubbed vegetable oil ( Canola, Olive or whatever the wife has in the pantry ) over the surface. This brightens and preserves what paint is left and gives the dash a lift.

As I said, this is the best I could come up with, hopefully someone has a better idea and I can make mine look like new as well.

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Guest Grant Magrath

Hey Kevin, do you want to give me a call and we can have a look for you? 027 373 1979

Cheers

Grant

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Thanks Gents for your suggestions, if I can get mine as good as Stuart's looks, I'll be well pleased. Grant, I will give you a call, to follow up your kind offer. The black paint, is on the ridges of the plate, rather than the depressions, so maybe scraping out the indentations, after painting the whole thing, would work. I was also thinking of sticking some string or fine cord into the grooves, before painting, might help.

Kevin

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Have you thought about using a brayer? Since the paint is on the ridges a firm rubber brayer like a printer would use should work. They work well to detail the edges of phonograph horns so you don't have to follow all those seams with a brush. They are detailed with gold. Black japan would work I would think and you can wash that off and start over if it isn't what you want. It dries quickly, but not so fast that you wouldn't have time to wipe it off and start over. Paint thinner or turpentine will wipe it off before it dries and that shouldn't disturb the old paint. You can also re-paint your old license plates that way. They will give you something to practice on. You can lay some paint out on a piece of glass and work it on to the roller that way and play around with it awhile until you get the hang of it. The japan will dry to a dull or flat finish.

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Guest Grant Magrath

I have an old set of scales that I need to restore. Where do you get Japan from? I haven't seen any around.

Cheers

Grant

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