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STuTZ693

Update on hauler Purchase

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Read me again billybird. I didn't buy the truck. I'm going to stand pat, maybe buy a new trailer sometime next year.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

reading these posts makes my head hurt! (but i'll put in my 2 cents worth) it just costs so dang much to tow.... interesting to compare the rigs. my youngest has a ford with the 6.0 diesel...EXPENSIVE to repair! the 7.3 is better. dodge cummings is the best if you have the manual trans. gmc/chevy duramax is so so. my own towing experience has been my '73 1/2ton 4x4 suburban with 402 big block stick shift (10mpg), '04 nissan titan (11mpg), and '99 toy tacoma 4cyl automatic 2wd (15mpg) towing up to 7000# (car and open trailer). the sub and titan handled it best and the toy did it when in a pinch. if i were to tow frequently i probably buy a good cheap used BIG 6 wheel class 8 truck (and mount an old small travel trailer or camper behind the cab) register it as a rv and go with it. could do it under $10,000 with careful shopping. and still get 11-12 mpg. btw...good idea to keep the mph to 60 max. (car trailer tires can be unfaithful):eek:

Edited by mrspeedyt (see edit history)

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...good idea to keep the mph to 60 max. (car trailer tires can be unfaithful):eek:

:):P Unfaithful? I love it. Hey speedy read the trailer tire threads and see how much company you have with that statement.;)

I've got one more long tow for the year and one spare tire left, so maybe I'll luck out coming back home on 4 tires, instead of three. :confused::D

Wayne

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So what is it with trailer tires? Why do they blow so much, aren't they manufactured with the same quality as auto/truck tires? Are Radial better than bias type? I wouldn't think it would be the weight since they are rated for hauling?

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So what is it with trailer tires? Why do they blow so much, aren't they manufactured with the same quality as auto/truck tires? ......

"Only the Wizard Knows!":D

Or that seems to be the case when we discussed this topic recently.

Check it out here.....

http://forums.aaca.org/f196/trailer-tires-again-282419.html

Wayne

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Trailer tires give lots of problems because the trailers and cargo often max out the weight capacity of the tires, people often leave their tires underinflated (which overheats them), aging tires may not be replaced on a timely basis (even if the tread is still good), many tires suffer from extreme sun exposure due to trailers being stored on open ground, and the tires can suffer unseen damage from road hazards and curb-strikes.

Note that all of these have a definite human factor involved. If you take care of trailer tires, size them correctly, check wear patterns and keep track of their age and mileage, you will be fine.

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if it was just so easy.... i've done the above and still have had failures with most of the radial trailer tires. (the origional bias rag tires preformed much better)

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I have been apprehensive about posting this as I don't want to jinx myself. In 2006, My trailer came with bias ply tires. After a short time, I realized that the trailer axles were in serious need of alignment, as the tires were wearing unevenly. I went to my friendly hometown tire shop and told them to replace the tires. I also had another local company that specializes in trailer alignment and repair, correct the axle issues.

I have never had a tire failure on this trailer. I have hauled that trailer, for thousands of miles, at speeds higher than I probably should have, for over 3 years.

When I got back from Louisville, I noticed that two of the tires are wearing unevenly a little bit. I just took the trailer back and had the axles realigned. They recommended replacing the bearings so I had them do that too. Now I am going to go back to my tire guy and have him replace the tires.

I have never told him what to put on anything. I just tell them to put on whatever they recommend. They have never steered me wrong. They have been in business since way before I was born and they only sell stuff that they have faith in. I have no idea where my tires were made, and I would have to go look to see what brand they are, but I know it has worked for me.

I have never even had a spare tire on my trailer, but after reading about all of the trials and tribulations everybody has had, I plan to buy a rim and take one of the better tires on the trailer now and have them mount it so I will have a spare with me, just in case.

Good old fashioned American Businessmen who sell dependable products do still exist, at least they still do where I live!

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maybe an alignment of my trailer axles is necessary. one tire postion does wear faster than the other three. what is the cost of alignment on a two axle car trailer now days??

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Thanks Wayne

I wasn't aware that this had been covered. Went over there and read the posts. Seems its 50/50 some people like the radials, some like the bias tires. One thing that appears constant is a good quality tire made in the USA not China seems to last longer.

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Here it cost me a total of $150. ($75 per axle)

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Good points, Matt. I never thought about the axle alignment.

What I do:

--Nitrogen instead of air. Nitrogen does not create moisture as does air and thus prevents possible rusting of the trailer rims from the inside. Also it is cooler to keep tire heat down. The other advantage is constant pressure of Nitrogen. Have pressure of 50 p.s.i. in tires and after 7 months of winter storage each tire was around 49 p.s.i. Nitrogen costs only $2.00 per tire at a local tire store.

--Rotation: I have this done every 6,000 miles if for any other reason than to give myself the benefit of the doubt. 21,000 miles on the trailer without any problems.

Regards,

Peter.

--

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Peter,

Would like to put my position on nitrogen. The regular air that we breath is about 78% nitrogen, 18% Oxygen and the rest various gases. Regular air does not create moisture. The moisture content in regular atmospheric air is a variable of temperature, area of climate where water can be evaporated into the atmosphere, baromatic pressure, etc. If the person/business that is putting air in the tires has a good moisture separater/dryer on the line to fill your tires, you are getting almost the same thing coming out of a tank of nitrogen. IMO, the nitrogen story is upselling for more sales dollars. I have never used anything but compressed air on my tires and have not had any problems. Just my opinion and science.

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Peter,

Would like to put my position on nitrogen. The regular air that we breath is about 78% nitrogen, 18% Oxygen and the rest various gases. Regular air does not create moisture. The moisture content in regular atmospheric air is a variable of temperature, area of climate where water can be evaporated into the atmosphere, baromatic pressure, etc. If the person/business that is putting air in the tires has a good moisture separater/dryer on the line to fill your tires, you are getting almost the same thing coming out of a tank of nitrogen. IMO, the nitrogen story is upselling for more sales dollars. I have never used anything but compressed air on my tires and have not had any problems. Just my opinion and science.

Larry,

I am absolutely not a scientist however what I wrote works. Use nitrogen on my company car and tow vehicle with the same "very satisfied" results. The constant pressure of nitrogen for such a cheap price has definitely reduced having to hook up a compressor in bitter winter weather or going to the storage facility monthly with a compressor to cap off the trailer.

Another note is the tire dealer I have used for years will add nitrogen "if needed" without charge if the tires were purchased from them. Also includes "free" balancing and rotation even on the trailer.

What I posted is from very satisfied results over a long period of time. Too each his own.

Regards,

Peter.

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Speaking of towing to Louisville, we trailered our '56 Chevy wagon on an open trailer with the '05 GMC pickup I'm sure you have seen. We have a box trailer too, but I wanted to save a little gas on the 600 mile trip. On the trip out there and back our rig averaged around 12 mpg, sometimes even 12.2. This trip was through the mountains on I64 into West Virginia, then on to Kentucky on I64 all the way. My past experience with the box trailer has been around 10 mpg, a big difference.

My driving technique is to use 3rd gear on the automatic and not let the tranny downshift to second on its own, which means I have to kick the cruise control out on every hill. Aggravating, but using the torque of the V-8 engine saves fuel. If the hill is steep and the road speed drops below 55 or less, I'll let the tranny shift into 2nd gear.

On the way out, I was a little concerned about Sandstone mountain when coming back east. They actually make truckers stop at the top of the mountain, then proceed. I slowed my rig down and put it into second gear. I came all the way down in second, having to hit the brakes occasionally to get the speed down. The V-8 works best if you let a little more rpm (around 3000-4000) help hold the load back with its compression. The brakes never got hot, a good thing since it was over 90 degrees that day.

Hope that answers some questions. I'll check back in tomorrow.

Wayne

Wayne, thanks. Your experience mirrored mine as we took the same route. I was surprised that traffic was so heavy going up 81 and in parts of West VA. My little 6 cylinder did a bit better (14.1) on mileage, but not by much. I use the same shifting technique too. Thanks again. Sorry we missed each other at the show. Next time for sure.

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All, I appreciated the discussion here as I was looking to upgrade to an enclosed trailer and truck. I have been using a 02 Chev Trailblazer with an open steel trailer. This has served me well, but am at the capacity limit on the truck. I have had no problem towing with the Trailblazer with the I6 engine, and I do get a bit over 14 mpg pulling it between 55 and 60 mph.

Based on the discussions here I decided to get a 03 Chev Suburban 2500 (3/4 ton) with the 6 liter engine. The truck is the LT version and has the towing option with a trans cooler, bigger radiator, etc. Hopefully I will pick it up in a week or so. It is in FL and I am in VA, so will fly down and drive her home. Now the hunt is on for an enclosed trailer. I think I can find that locally.

Thanks for all the help in these discussions.

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