Jump to content

1925 standard six: I have a few questions.


Recommended Posts

Heello all,

Two month ago I bought a Studebaker standard six (I really love it) and have now tons of questions about.

1- I woul like to know what should be a normal fuel consumption for that car, mine uses 25-30 liters per 100 km (I think this represent 8 Miles per galon). Is this normal or is the car not well set

2- The car is in very good condition, but I would like to replace few parts. Living in Belgium, I don't know what is the best place to find parts like door handle, bumper clamp (the one in the middle od the front bumper made in brass), I also would like to equip it with an original jack (but I guess this costs a fortune).

3- I also would like to ad a thrunk to the car, but found no plase where I can find a support (Maybe articulated).

4- I would like to know what is the advance spark (not sure about the translation here, I'm french speaker and my level being what it is in English language, I'm sure you will understand).

I really thanks everybody in advance for the help and support you can provide.

Best regards.

JJ.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The "spark advance" controls when precisely the distributor sends the electrical spark pulse to the spark plugs in the cylinders. This is variable from "Retard" to "Advance" over a range of degrees rotation. Usually Retard is at full counter clockwise adjustment lever travel position and Advance is at full clockwise adjustment lever travel position. Often the best driving position is somewhere in the center of travel unless climbing hills where maximum power is desired.

In older cars it is best to set "Spark timing" at "Retard" for starting the engine so the spark occurs AFTER the piston is past the TDC "Top Dead Center" position and starting travel downward in cylinder. Once warmed up and driving it is best to set "Spark Timing" at "Advance" so the spark occurs BEFORE the piston is at Top Dead Center called "BTDC - Before Top Dead Center" this is so the combustion in the cylinder begins early so it is at maximum efficiency when the piston begins to travel downward in cylinder. This improves the power output of engine and also improves fuel consumption from the better combustion conditions.

I hope this translates to French well enough to understand.

Stude8

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Stude 8, it helps me a lot. Unfortunately, I have a fix ignition distributor and cannot manually set the ignition timing. I wil try first with spark at TDC, and will test to see what is the best to keep.

Thanks again.

JJ.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello again Tevel

I checked my files on 1925 Studebaker literature and found a mechanical summary from the factory advertising brochure that does mention the Std 6 models have a "fully automatic spark control system" which I think means an internal to distributor mechanical advance that adjusts itself with engine RPM speed changes.

I will attach the pages of interest for your information to this message and you should be able to print legible copies for reference. If they do no print clear enough contact me at studeracer_37@yahoo.com and I can email full resolution copies.

Stude8

post-31139-143138228843_thumb.jpg

post-31139-143138228849_thumb.jpg

post-31139-143138228856_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Stude 8,

That's very interesting. Lots of the informations on those documents are new for me and important (like gasoline tank capacity, due to the fact that my gauge doesn't work anymore).

As I said in previous reply, I will try this weekend to properly set the distributor (as soon as I find the reason for the 6th cylindre not having ingnition) and let you know how it works.

Thanks.

JJ.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I live in Normandy, France and have a 1925 Standard 6 which I run regularly. Unfortunately, I have never measured the fuel consumption here since I moved from the US (if I knew how much it used I would stop spending the money). Perhaps I should. However, you can call me anytime and we can discuss the car. Steve +33 9 64 26 97 39

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I live in Normandy, France and have a 1925 Standard 6 which I run regularly. Unfortunately, I have never measured the fuel consumption here since I moved from the US (if I knew how much it used I would stop spending the money). Perhaps I should. However, you can call me anytime and we can discuss the car. Steve +33 9 64 26 97 39

I forgot to mention, I also have a spare manual for the car...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Greetings Tevel,

I am glad I read this posting- I just purchased a 1925 Studebaker Standard Six.

Its not in great condition at all- sitting in a shed in the rain of the Pacific North West (Washington State).

I would love to see some pictures of yours so I can have a starting point!

Cheers and happy hunting!

Joe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joe,

Happy to oblige. You can email me directly at stephen .bysouth @orange .fr. Just let me know what photo's you need. The car is pretty much in original condition (original paint, upholstry, etc) with only one part missing (the right-angled drive between the gear-box/transmission and the speedometer cable). I have had the engine restored after breaking a valve but before then I drove it from Houston TX to Austin TX and back one July (think hot and humid). Under those conditions and a worn engine, I had to stop every 30 mins and add water to the radiator: it took 7 hours each way!

Mine is a Brougham (there are only 2 known at the moment): what model is yours? A popular model is/was the 'Duplex Pheaton' which was a closed car which converted to an 'open' car with a fixed roof, but they had humpteen models back then. I also recommend the Antique Studebaker Club since it is a relatively small club and their members are very frendly and helpful. For the Standard 6, through the club, you will find all the parts you need, pretty much. Close to you is Sandy Olson (Olson Gaskets) who is a Studebaker enthusiast, a good friend of mine and knows most of the Stude folks in your area. He may be a better contact than me but he doesn't have a Std 6.

So drop me an email and I will see what I can do. Oh yes, and if you hear of a 1913 SA25 back end...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the information and the help. I am hoping to have a positive identification of the cars by the end of the week. You would think this would be the easy task- unfortunatly I have been unable to find a solid, acurrate resource to identify the serial number ranges and engine types to confirm what I have.

Cheers!

Joe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I have a 1925 Studebaker. The pictures I have seen it looks to be a 5 passenger coupe. Someone told me it was a light 6 due to the distributer placement" passenger side at rear of engine" can someone confirm if it is a light 6 or standard 6. Also I am in need of a few parts. I need the fusebox base assembly which is located at bottom of steering column and has gear to control headlights, etc. Also I need a passenger side window crank gearbox, the pot metal on both these items have crumbled. I could also use a new tail light bottom lense "clear & curved". Thanks for your help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dr Weaver. As stude8 (the President is still running well and I still have the steering column you sold me) said, having the serial numbers from the car or any of the parts, will help identify the car. Tom me though, it sounds like a Starndard 6 and would have ER in the serial number. As for your parts search: I had to make new gear boxes for the window winders all round on mine. Otherwise, the Antique Studebakers Club members can help. They are usually at Hershey too if you can get there. that is where I found all the crank handles and pulls for the inside of the doors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dr Weaver, post the chassis serial number and engine serial number of your "1925 Studebaker" and we can positively identify the vehicle year and model. Also post a photo if possible.

Stude8

I have the registration card from 1936 and the chassis serial # is 1263131 and the engine # is 265425. The # on the passenger side of block is 123096-1. I have'nt figured out how to get my pictures posted on here yet, but will post pics ASAP. Thanks, Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...

Mornng all,

Sorry for being mute for so long, but had professional prriorities that prevent me to share more with you.

Studebaker 25, thanks for the picture and phone number, will try to contact you as soon as I have a moment. I'd really appreciate speaking wwith you about those cars.

Jo Navaro, I only have a few oustide pictures, I going to take some more and post them.

Have a GREAT day all.

JJ.

post-67753-143138446465_thumb.jpg

post-67753-143138446823_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Steve

You might have better luck finding the proverbial hen's tooth than one of those coils with the side high tension terminal. According to my 1930 Chilton's interchange book, only three cars used it, all Studebakers. Standard 6 for 1925, and Big and Special 6's for 1926.

Studebaker's part number was 106837.

Terry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Steve,

Yes, that is the coil I have. Are you sure the coil is burned out? Make sure you check the little round resistor unit that sits on to of one of the coil terminals. You can just by pass that unit and connect the wire going to it directly to the coil and see how that works. In the meantime, I'll clean up the unit I have and make sure it works. And let me know if you will be needing a replacement resistor unit - not sure if I have one that works.

Scott

smrdeza@power-net.net

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...