bb1970

Post some pics of your Rivieras!!!!!!!!!!

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Took it out for about 300 miles this weekend on nothing but backroads, stopping at all the little cool bars, restaurants, and other cool areas.  No interstate weekend :) 

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trip7.png

trip8.png

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I recently had the brakes completely rebuilt on my 68 Rivi. I wanted to share a picture of the original drums after they were turned and repainted using high temp paint.

The front drums were primered then painted using high temp Aluminum color.

The rear drums were primered then painted using high temp Cast Iron color.

I think they came out looking pretty good!

The cars previous owner put some tire conditioner on the tires that turned the white walls tan. He said he tried to clean the tires

to remove the 'stain' but no joy. I used Bleche White a couple of times but still no joy.

Any recommendations on getting the WW's white again without damaging the rubber or the chrome plating on my wheels?

IMG_20170823_190626_675.thumb.jpg.132cd2ecf79e8bfbf972eb68485ba8e9.jpg

 

20170826_142429.thumb.jpg.f1f18933d85aa2b626547b8d33e3186e.jpg20170826_142439.thumb.jpg.221b33c0ce085c57fb56fd0fc9c0b9f4.jpg

 

New Master Cylinder painted with same Cast Iron color. I am thinking about masking off my brake booster and painting it with cadmium colored paint.

20170826_142218.thumb.jpg.8d9fc16a21bd6fb7134e2ac3e84057bf.jpg

Edited by NCRiviera (see edit history)
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"Back in the day" before all of this new fandangled stuff came out, we used to use lacquer thinner.

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On a rag. Use it just like you'd use any other cleaner. Scrub the white walls with it.

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2 minutes ago, RivNut said:

On a rag. Use it just like you'd use any other cleaner. Scrub the white walls with it.

I think I have some sitting around. I will give that a try. Thanks for the recommendation!

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A comment on painting aluminum drums.  I had someone tell me some time ago, that painting aluminum drums had a tendency to cause the aluminum to hold heat rather than dissipate it.  I don't know where he got his info nor have I heard it from anyone else.  But in a way it makes sense. Has anyone else heard the Same?  He said the same applied to polishing them as well.  Something having to do with "closing the porosity" of the aluminum. ????

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I thought I'd share an image in my classic car photographic slide collection

1973 Buick Riviera in Burgundy Poly Metallic. This image is from a 1973 dated Kodachrome slide.

The watermark is for my Ebay listing of this picture.

1973_Riviera_wm.thumb.jpg.a29991080cbc2425b0f7246344d139a8.jpg

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12 hours ago, NCRiviera said:

Beautiful ride!

First rate, first Class

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12 hours ago, PullmeoverRED said:

Here's my baby in the Mission, San Francisco!DSC_0378.thumb.JPG.0d9630cac361627447c89c226f91df3c.JPG

Outstanding.

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Rivnut, polished aluminum will tend to have a lower convective coefficient of heat transfer than a rough one.  With a polished surface you are essentially flattened the microscopic surface roughness far more than a raw cast surface.  All those nooks and crannies allow heat to transfer (more surface area touching the air).  

 

Paint would essentially be like wrapping a part in super thin blanket.  The effect is probably minimal, but paint would negatively affect heat transfer.

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On 8/31/2017 at 10:53 AM, RivNut said:

we used to use lacquer thinner.

Ed, I took your suggestion and used some lacquer thinner to break the staining on my white walls. I then used Bleche White and a stainless steel scrub brush to deep clean the tires. Though not bright white, the WWs are whiter than they were. Thank you for your suggestion. FYI, lacquer thinner will soften rubber and plastic so rinsing with soapy water between applications of thinner is highly recommended. 

Before cleaning :

20170826_142429.thumb.jpg.073839aa44dc42e4b87c6ae7aab93b7c.jpg

 

After cleaning front tire :

20170901_115837.thumb.jpg.e2030779b454bed9d21e2cae4cb19a9e.jpg

 

Before cleaning back tire :

20170826_142439.thumb.jpg.f6ebbfe7f3c8715d94556112b47f124d.jpg

 

After cleaning back tire :

20170901_115845.thumb.jpg.1105e3b3cdd22d4b062e60823e9f09cd.jpg

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On ‎8‎/‎31‎/‎2017 at 9:09 AM, NCRiviera said:

 

New Master Cylinder painted with same Cast Iron color. I am thinking about masking off my brake booster and painting it with cadmium colored paint.

 

Boster Dewey does a great job at a fair price.

Check my post at:

 

http://forums.aaca.org/topic/283749-dewey-does-it/?tab=comments#comment-1530320

 

Champaign poly' will work too. But brake fluid dissolves most paints.

 

 

 

 

Edited by PWB (see edit history)

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16 hours ago, NCRiviera said:

then used Bleche White

 

That's all I use -- never disappoints!  Yours are lookin' good now.  ;)

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Luv that vinyl turret!  ;)

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Fall is upon us. Cool and crisp, but I'm not complaining.

IMG_3730.PNG

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