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1950 Buick Special freeze plug help


Guest sconnors

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Guest sconnors

Hi guys

Need some help. I have a freeze plug that's leaking. I ordered a kit from oldbuickparts.com which according to them fits all straight eight engines from 1923-1953. However none of the plugs in the kit fit! Went to the parts store and the guy there looked one up and it calls for the same size that I got from oldbuickparts.com, however the freeze plug in my engine is smaller for some reason. I put a rubber one in for now, but am going to the parts store tomorrow to try to get a right size one. Anyone else ever run into this?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Scott

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I must be missing something here.Why can't you knock & pry the old one out, take it to the local parts store, and have them match the size? Every local auto parts store I've dealt with here in Texas has an assortment of freeze plugs available.

Pete Phillips, BCA #7338

Sherman, Texas

1948 Roadmaster sedan

1949 Super Estate Wagon

1950 Roadmaster 2-dr, ht.

1959 Electra 2-dr.

1962 Electra 225 4-dr. ht

1963 Wildcat conv.

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Guest sconnors

That's what I'm doing tomorrow. I was just wondering if anyone had run into the same situation where their engine has an odd size freeze plug? Just looking for an explanation as to why the freeze plug would not be a standard size.

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Is this a matter of the plug being just a tiny bit too big to go in? If so, you could probably run some emory cloth around the inside diameter of the block hole, and then use a drift to start the new plug straight and set it. Also I understand it's best to use a sealer on these, but I don't know what to use.

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Guest NikeAjax

Once again, I agree with John (jeez John, cut it out:D). Don't take this wrong, but how much of a difference is there? Those things are a real b!tc# to get in, and almost as hard to get out! I like to use a long socket, one that fits in nice and snug, and wham that thing in there with as big a hammer I can handle at those very close quarters. On my 322, V8, there's soooo much to get in the f***ing way, you almost give up and then it starts going in, but not before your arms feel like rubber-bands from slinging that six-pound hammer! Again, I can't see the part! Oh, do you have a plug for the cylinder-head, and not a plug for the block, maybe?

Jaybird

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Guest sconnors

Well to give you an an example of how much difference there is, I can take the old one that came out and literally set it inside the replacement one I got online. Plus I ordered a kit for every freeze plug in the engine and the sizes are either too small or too big.

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Take large drift/punch and knock the old one in and fish it out with a magnet to a position where you can grip it with a pair of pliers and pull it out. You will always find that the new plug seems larger as it must be driven in with the punch and fit VERY tight. Do not worry about the fact that you must use a lot of force as this is simply how they fit. Use a punch that is NOT small but one that is LARGE and fits as much of the entire interior of the plug as possible. Use a large mechanics hammer and not a claw hammer. I always put some sealer around the plug as well, a very small amount. I usually use a product called Lock Tight which comes in various grades but acts as a sealer as well. The medium grade is fine. Have done this many times and the plug must fit very tight. Good Luck is not necessary. Patrick W. Brooks

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