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Correct Transmission oil for straight cut gears?


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I have a 1928 Gardner. I"m not sure what weight oil to use in the gearbox and differential. I know the Model T's used the very heavy 600 wt steam engine oil for the rear and the gearbox ran in engine oil, but this transmission is pretty far removed from the older model T.

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I use the 600W in both my 23 and 28. I use regular 90w gear oil in the rear end. Here is where I get it. I think that 3 qts fills my transmission, but you need to check on how much your transmission holds. Now they always shift great, not fast, but nice and smooth.

600-W Oil

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600 was the standard trans and rear-end lube prior to the mid-1930's.

600W is "steam cylinder oil", and is slightly different than plain 600.

Both are a REALLY thick, sticky lube, and tend to work better in non-synchronized trannies than modern lighter-weight oils.

600 also tends to stay behind primitive seals better.

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Guest prewar40

The original transmission is a Warner 3-speed.

Gardner recommended Gargoyle Mobiloil "C", sometimes they just called it Mobiloil "C". They listed that as the correct oil for the transmission, differential, U-joints, steering gear housing and with a high pressure gun the steering gear pivots, spline shaft, rear wheel bearings (use sparingly).

Now this would be useful if I knew what the weight Mobiloil "C".

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The original transmission is a Warner 3-speed.

Gardner recommended Gargoyle Mobiloil "C", sometimes they just called it Mobiloil "C". They listed that as the correct oil for the transmission, differential, U-joints, steering gear housing and with a high pressure gun the steering gear pivots, spline shaft, rear wheel bearings (use sparingly).

Now this would be useful if I knew what the weight Mobiloil "C".

It looks like this oil is still made. Viscosity's given in this chart.

http://www.mobil.com/USA-English/Lubes/PDS/Pds_Files/glxxenindmogargoyle_arctic_oils.pdf

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Thanks everyone. Looks like the consensus is 600 WT oil. I will order some today.
John,

I purchased Mobil 600W Cylinder oil #98K814-601260 from here.

Quality Oil Co

Address: 55 N 400 E, Valparaiso, IN 46383

Phone: (219) 462-2951

5 gals @$73.00 with shipping if I remember correctly

May never use it all in my lifetime but who knows.

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Present-day Mobil "Gargoyle Arctic C Heavy", is a refrigeration oil (compressors) with an ISO viscosity of 46, according the link.

I'd suggest more research before ordering a 5-gallon bucket / drum for use in an automobile driveline.

If this present Gargoyle C is designed to work in a refrigeration system ( remain fluid at very cold temps ), that doesn't sound like a close relative to goopy 600 / 600W / Steam Cylinder oil... ?

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How about Mobilgear 600 XP ?

Gear Oil, 600 XP 460, Size 1 Gal - Oils - Lubricants - Power Tools & Metalworking : Grainger Industrial Supply

Grainger site lists it at $24.95 / gal.

ISO viscosity of 460 ( little thicker than Gargoyle C )

Specifically listed as a heavy gear-oil for spur & bevel gear drives.

(FYI - 600W, is specifically a "steam cylinder oil", that is also widely used for worm-gear drives. http://www.mobil.com/Canada-English/Lubes/PDS/IOCAENINDMOMobil_600W_Cylinder_Oil.asp )

Edited by De Soto Frank (see edit history)
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You might be right that the Gargoyle C is not the same as it used to be. I would think a call to Mobile would clear that up, but lets not fail to remember the old mineral oils were not a stable as modern oils and modern oils of lesser cold viscosity, may result in the same or even better viscosity's when they are warm. I tried the suggested mineral oil in my 31 and 33 Cadillacs and they operated better on the modern stuff. BTW the Modern Gargoyle C is about the same Viscosity as 80-90 wt. gear oil according to the chart.

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I'm confused by the chart from Lubriplate. They list viscosity at various temps. What is the standard temp that everyone rates viscosity at? The chart at Restoration Supply is quite different for the same product, so I can't make sense out of which is correct.

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I would go with the Lubriplate charts because they are the manufacturer. I don't remember the particulars on my reading because it was a few years ago, but the SPO-299 was determined to be the modern day equivalent of 600 wt. IMO :eek:

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Ok, let me see if I have this right?

600W and 600 wt. are two different oils (greases)

600W oil is "steam cylinder oil" and is not the equivalent of early trans gear grease.

600 wt. is what we should be using, and a modern equivalent is Lubriplate SPO-299 that is available at Restoration Supply www.restorationstuff.com . (Even though they call it 600W).

Am I right?

Dwight

Edited by Dwight Romberger (see edit history)
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This is a tuff one as there is a lot of bad info.

A Model A guy followed the path of standards changes from the 30's to modern oils. What he found was the following as equivalent to the original gear oil.

Mobil:

Mobilgear 636

BP:

Energol GR-XP 680

Castrol:

Castrol Alpha LS680

Shell:

Omala 680

Texaco:

Meropa 680

A common sub is to take 140 wt and add in STP. Some have even run only on STP. STP is not a lubricant, it is a viscosity modifier.

The above oil is only available in 5 gallon cans so you will want to find friends to share the oil. Keep in mind the stuff is not very expensive.

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