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Restorer32

Tucker Convertible on E-Bay

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Hardly. I don't believe the car is real, either.

I find it hard to believe that only a bookkeeper for the company is the only one that remembers the project. Nothing else in writing yet almost every blueprint from the factory is accounted for.

In the case of my car being modified by Hess & Eisenhardt there were quite a number of retirees that remembered working on a Mark II convertible. Wouldn't you? How come no one remembers working on this beast?

Granted, the Tucker was made 8 years before my car, which would make a 20 year old tin knocker in '48, 82 years old today.

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The fact that the car has a '47 Buick or Cadillac top assembly kinda tells the tale for me. Unlikely that the designers of even a prototype car would simply lift such an important part from a competitors car and miraculously have it fit. Surely some design work went into the car before it was "built". Are we to believe they designed it to use a competitors top assembly? Unlike engineers to attempt something like this without drawings. And what did they put on their time cards at the end of the week? And why the secrecy anyway? Wouldn't Tucker want all the publicity he could get? I did notice that the sellers are deemphasizing the "factory built" claims for the car and putting more emphasis on the fact that the car is likely the last Tucker of any style to be assembled. Sadly someone will eventually buy the car and over the next 25-50 years it will likely become a "real" factory prototype.

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While the convertible top assembly on my Mark II was totally scratch made at H & E the Derham Mark II convertible used the entire convertible top "tub" from a '57 Ford convertible. While Tucker didn't have a corporate parts bin like Ford did, it's doubtful that they would have used another manufacturers top bows.

That would be hardly an innovation on a very innovative car.

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Especially considering that Tucker was proud of the "uniqueness" of his cars.

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Knowing Al's reputation, I'd be willing to wager that the Tucker just might be the real deal.

I personally don't think it is real and his one son a good friend of mine doesn't think it is either. After having an argument with Al at Hershey regarding the Tucker I figured its not worth jeopardizing our friendship. Al is a good friend whom I see and speak too a lot and on occasion use their shop for having upholstery work done.

Al does bring up a point on the doors, they are either 6" or 9" longer than a standard Tucker and are stamped. According to him it is a solid piece of metal not added on or extended. Then again someone could have extended the door frame and installed all new door skin? The Tucker bickering continues.

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I KFD that they would have gone to the expense of making stamping dies for a prototype door. Way too expensive, even then. I'm sure it was done on a buck by a skilled metal crafter. If there were dies there would be engineering drawings for them.

Mystery solved.

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I decided to do a bit of reading about this <NOBR>car</NOBR>, and did a search for tucker convertible, and found it. I went through every link on the site, read everything, and came away with the conclusion 'That I believe this car was planned, designed, enc, and that's all'. I have really no doubt that there were more frame assemblies then the actual 50 used. And we all know there are lots of leftover body panels, mechanical components, documentation and such. The Cammack collection in Alexandria, Virginia has a huge collection of the aforementioned leftovers as well as three Tuckers.

Has anyone considered contacting the Commack’s, and asking them if they have any Tucker convertible documentation to support the possibility of this car?

Just a thought.

Here is the <NOBR>internet</NOBR> address for the site I visited:

Benchmark Classics Presents the Tucker Convertible!<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

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Jim,

Jim, I attended the AACA Grand National Meet at the Gilmore Museum. I learned a little bit about Tuckers at the Gilmore Museum. It is an interesting subject to read about.

You might want to check out these links for more information from the club that has most of the Tucker factory documents that exist.

:: The Official Tucker Club of America ::

Tucker '48 Automobile Bulletin Board • View topic - Official TACA Position on Tucker Convertible

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Unlikely that the designers of even a prototype car would simply lift such an important part from a competitors car and miraculously have it fit. Surely some design work went into the car before it was "built". Are we to believe they designed it to use a competitors top assembly?

While the whole project, their lame "marketing" of it, and the back and forth, "real-not-real" smells to the high Heavens, let's remember this...

Many companies shared components in the postwar era; let's use GM's HydraMatic auto tranny as an example.

When the transmission plant burned to the ground in an horrific blaze in 1953, many companies (including all of FoMoCo, and too many more to list) were left in the lurch to supply that newest feature. A good friend has a '53 Caddy with a Dynaflow transmission, and I have an large posterboard filled with Automotive News articles on how GM scrambled to make do with Dynaflow till the Hydra plant was back in operation.

That said, I still think the boys in the Cheese State would have done better if they'd just made a pretty, well-executed tribute car (which they did), and left all the ballyhoo & BS out of the equation.

By now, with all the ebay millions and wasted ink washed under the bridge of no return,

it's rather like Chicken Little and, "The sky is falling!"

TG

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)

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The fact that the car has a '47 Buick or Cadillac top assembly kinda tells the tale for me. Unlikely that the designers of even a prototype car would simply lift such an important part from a competitors car and miraculously have it fit.

Sadly someone will eventually buy the car and over the next 25-50 years it will likely become a "real" factory prototype.

Since we are theorizing about what might have been, I will concede the possibility that a small startup making a prototype car might have used an off-the-shelf system in this manner. I mean, didn't the Tucker transmission come from a surplus Cord parts supply? But it is all only a possibility--did Al Pruiett see the top assembly when he looked at the frame and body parts in 1966? And even then it was 18 years after--lots of 1947 Buicks went through parts salvage in those 18 years. I am also still skeptical.

I like Tuckers and the Tucker story, but in this age of "tribute" cars and breathless promotion I agree that this car will somehow be legitimized and phased into revisionist history. Not good IMO.

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Personally, I'm pretty skeptical of the whole thing. However, my understanding of the Tucker operation would lead me to believe they were more likely to source outside for a top mechanism then engineer one from scratch. The previously alluded to Cord transmission being a prime example.

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Then maybe I misunderstood. I'm under the impression that the car came with no top bows. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

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Personally, I'm pretty skeptical of the whole thing. However, my understanding of the Tucker operation would lead me to believe they were more likely to source outside for a top mechanism then engineer one from scratch. The previously alluded to Cord transmission being a prime example.

Let's not forget the Lincoln steering wheel, and aviation engine...

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The fact that the car has a '47 Buick or Cadillac top assembly kinda tells the tale for me. Unlikely that the designers of even a prototype car would simply lift such an important part from a competitors car and miraculously have it fit. Surely some design work went into the car before it was "built". Are we to believe they designed it to use a competitors top assembly? Unlike engineers to attempt something like this without drawings. And what did they put on their time cards at the end of the week? And why the secrecy anyway? Wouldn't Tucker want all the publicity he could get? I did notice that the sellers are deemphasizing the "factory built" claims for the car and putting more emphasis on the fact that the car is likely the last Tucker of any style to be assembled. Sadly someone will eventually buy the car and over the next 25-50 years it will likely become a "real" factory prototype.

Not that I have any idea if it is real or not, I will interject that the first prototype Tucker shown was over a 1942 Oldsmobile chassis or something like that. At least that is what I read.

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I have a Delorean that is probably worth $18,000. Now if I cut the top off and make a convertible out of it, it would be a one of a kind. And for a barrel of Guiness and some Old Patty I could get some Irishmen to document it for me.

Do you think I could get 1/2 a million for it???

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Jim,

Jim, I attended the AACA Grand National Meet at the Gilmore Museum. I learned a little bit about Tuckers at the Gilmore Museum. It is an interesting subject to read about.

You might want to check out these links for more information from the club that has most of the Tucker factory documents that exist.

:: The Official Tucker Club of America ::

Tucker '48 Automobile Bulletin Board • View topic - Official TACA Position on Tucker Convertible

Matt, Thanks for the information. I'll be doing a bit more reading! I saw my 1st. Tucker in the late 50tys, and I've always liked there design, and engineering.

Someday the Tucker convertible mystery will rest with a conclusive statement. Can't wait to hear about it.

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I wish I had raed the Tucker links that Matt sent to me before I posted a reply. The TACA statement settles it for me.

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I have a Delorean that is probably worth $18,000. Now if I cut the top off and make a convertible out of it, it would be a one of a kind. And for a barrel of Guiness and some Old Patty I could get some Irishmen to document it for me.

Do you think I could get 1/2 a million for it???

Sure you could, laddie...

Just run it through Barrett-Jackson ! ;)

( Does Doc Brown come with it ? )

Edited by DeSoto Frank (see edit history)

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